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Keifers
10-06-2006, 08:40 AM
Please post the strings and tensions you've liked in this racquet.

Would also appreciate any other comments on how this racquet plays. (How does its graphite/fiberglass affect performance and feel?)

Thanks in advance.

Valjean
10-06-2006, 11:03 AM
When it first came out, it won Tennis magazine's endorsement. It had good touch and adequate power. Its technology is a bit dated now, though; it's heavier for this than many of today's racquets and lacks their power. Still, for a player who can generate his own, it's usable enough. You won't get as much help responding to power shots by an opponent, particularly at net or aimed at your body.

I'd still stick Prince Original Synthetic Gut in it if you want a basic string. For a soid multi go to Prince's Premier with Softflex. This presumes you're not a stringbreaker too.

Keifers
10-06-2006, 11:32 AM
Many thanks, Valjean. Sounds like the Graduate can use a string with some pop? Would NRG2 or Biphase suit? I'm not a stringbreaker.

PBODY99
10-07-2006, 05:02 AM
Either of thse strings would be fine. I have one player still using the CTS series and he gets away with 17g multi's.:cool:

Keifers
10-07-2006, 12:52 PM
As a starting point, I put Babolat Super Fine Play 16 in it @ 58, which is middle of the tension range. (SFP is an inexpensive, very-nice-playing string -- too bad its playability doesn't last very long.)

This combo plays very nicely. Good power, very good control, crisp volleys, nice pop on the serve.

With an overgrip and O-ring dampener, weight is 357 grams. String pattern is 14x18.

Valjean
10-07-2006, 07:22 PM
The heft of the CTS Graduate should give you adequate pop when combined with a string of moderate power like the above two I name--particularly in baseline play when you have time to uncoil. NRG2 might well be a step too far.

Keifers
10-07-2006, 08:20 PM
The heft of the CTS Graduate should give you adequate pop when combined with a string of moderate power like the above two--particularly in baseline play when you have time to uncoil. NRG2 might well be a step too far.
Hope you don't mind another question, Valjean... What differences can I expect when I go from SFP 16 to Biphase 17 in this racquet (at the same tension)?

(I've actually never used Biphase before, but I have a set.)

Thanks.

dancraig
10-07-2006, 08:28 PM
I had a CTS Presision, the purple one. The Graduate was the silver one, right? I recall the top of the line for that "line" was the CTS Approach, or was it the Thunderstick.

It's hard to remember as that was about 17 or 18 years ago.

Keifers
10-07-2006, 08:40 PM
I had a CTS Presision, the purple one. The Graduate was the silver one, right? I recall the top of the line for that "line" was the CTS Approach, or was it the Thunderstick.
Yes, the Graduate is silver, with some areas of faded-teal-green. Pale grey bumper, grip and butt cap. This one was made in Taiwan. Nice finish.

Not sure what you mean by top of the line. Can you say more about that?

dancraig
10-07-2006, 08:48 PM
Yes, the Graduate is silver, with some areas of faded-teal-green. Pale grey bumper, grip and butt cap. This one was made in Taiwan. Nice finish.

Not sure what you mean by top of the line. Can you say more about that?

As I recall, the CTS (Constant Taper System) had three or four models. The Precision, which was the one I had, was at the bottom of the price structure. I think it was a little less stiff than the Graduate, which I believe was next up in price. The Approach was a little wider at the top and stiffer still. The Thunderstick was very wide at the top and had the highest suggested retail price. They were referred to as Constant Taper System because the beam width grew progressively thinner as you moved toward the bottom of the hoop.

I think I have heard it said that the CTS line was one of the best Prince ever sold.

Keifers
10-07-2006, 09:32 PM
As I recall, the CTS (Constant Taper System) had three or four models. The Precision, which was the one I had, was at the bottom of the price structure. I think it was a little less stiff than the Graduate, which I believe was next up in price. The Approach was a little wider at the top and stiffer still. The Thunderstick was very wide at the top and had the highest suggested retail price. They were referred to as Constant Taper System because the beam width grew progressively thinner as you moved toward the bottom of the hoop.

I think I have heard it said that the CTS line was one of the best Prince ever sold.
Yes, I've played with 3 different CTS racquets now -- Approach OS, DB 26 OS and Graduate 90 -- and have been impressed with each one. The Approach was a noticeable step up in power from the DB 26.

So maybe the price went up as the maximum beam width (at 12 o'clock) went up? (Would make sense as they seem to charge less for player's frames and more for tweeners...)

I understand there was a CTS Lightning, too. Any idea where that fit in the range?

dancraig
10-07-2006, 10:02 PM
I don't remember much about the Lightning. But I think you are correct about the thicker racquets costing more. I think the Precision and the Graduate had the same width, with the Graduate containing a higher percentage of graphite vs fiberglass. This made it stiffer and more costly.

I sold mine to a high school player and she sold it to another high school player. I saw it on the court last week. I had taken really good care of it and it still looks good.

Valjean
10-08-2006, 04:34 AM
Hope you don't mind another question, Valjean... What differences can I expect when I go from SFP 16 to Biphase 17 in this racquet (at the same tension)?....
Unfortunately I'm no fan of Biphase, which exactly contrary to the USRSA review I found to be stiff and boardy and lacking power too. I have never disagreed so totally, before and since, with one of the play reviews. I actually thought they might be talking about Babolat's Xcel Premium instead, that someone just erroneously put the Biphase name on the article.... Anyhow, if you go by their review, you should want to raise tension by roughly 3 lbs. or more. In my world, forced to use the Biphase myself, I would probably still lower tension by the same amount.

In either case, the exact differential would take into account how much your game accepts the added features a premium multi gives you access to.

And by the way, here is that review: http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/X117/X117Review.html

hadoken
10-09-2006, 07:34 AM
Just type in "CTS" into the TW search box and you'll get plenty of info on the CTS line. The Graduate 90 is not powerful at all. I used to use it and it is a very fast racquet given it's balance and small head but has a ton of flex compared to a modern racquet. Crisp playing strings work well with these frames.

The power level of these frames was based on the width at the head...the Thunderstick is 32mm and quite a beast. The Lightning was somewhere inbetween the Graduate and the Approach in power. Lightning is a great frame. The mids in the Lightning and Approach series still have strong demand on the used market

thomas martinez
10-09-2006, 09:58 AM
the Thunderstick was 36mm, it was the Storm that was 32mm. Then you had the Approach at 28mm, the Lighting and Blast at 26mm, then the Response, Graduate and Precision at 24mm.