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View Full Version : SW and Eastern backhand, the same??


Janne
10-09-2006, 12:44 PM
When I use the SW grip for the forehand and get a ball back to the backhand side I dont switch grips, instead I just flip the racquet and it's in a Eastern backhand grip, is this right or have I messed the grips up somehow? :P

es-0
10-09-2006, 01:34 PM
i think thats wrong.... SW, looking straight at the butt of the racquet (face perpendicular to ground) is when the base of the index finger is on the bottom right bevel. correct?

the extreme eastern bh is opposite from that, the base of the index on the top left bevel, the eastern is the base of the index on the top


if im wrong, please correct me

drakulie
10-09-2006, 01:38 PM
No, that would make the backhand an extreme eastern.

Voltron
10-09-2006, 01:39 PM
A WESTERN forehand is an eastern backhand. When you hold the raquet (face perpendicular to the ground) the TOP bevel. Sorry if I sounded condisending, thats not the way I meant this. Hope this helps.

Best Regards,
Voltron

snoflewis
10-09-2006, 02:46 PM
A WESTERN forehand is an eastern backhand. When you hold the raquet (face perpendicular to the ground) the TOP bevel. Sorry if I sounded condisending, thats not the way I meant this. Hope this helps.

Best Regards,
Voltron

that's correct. a western forehand = eastern 1hbh. a semiwestern grip is the same off both wings.

Janne
10-10-2006, 03:39 PM
Hmm, I´m not sure I´ve got it down yet... I´ll take some pictures tomorrow and post them here!

Janne
10-11-2006, 01:49 AM
I´m back with pictures!

Semi-western Forehand Angle 1:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v160/JanneK/tennis/SWForehand1.jpg

Semi-western Forehand Angle 2:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v160/JanneK/tennis/SWForehand2.jpg

What backhand is this:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v160/JanneK/tennis/1HBType1.jpg

And this:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v160/JanneK/tennis/1HBType2.jpg

Thank you!

PS: This reminds me that I have to revive the "Pics of your room"-thread. :D

ondray
10-11-2006, 02:02 AM
The first backhand grip pic looks like somewhere between eastern backhand and extreme eastern backhand. More towards eastern backhand. Can't see where the heel of your palm is though.

Second backhand grip looks like continental but can't see where the heel of your palm is.

If I understood correctly, grips are usually classified using the base of the index finger AND the heel of the palm. That's why we get hybrid grips and in-between grips.

ondray
10-11-2006, 02:03 AM
Oh yea, the forehand grip definitely looks pure semi-western.

Wait, looking at it again, it does look like it's in between western and semi-western.

Janne
10-11-2006, 02:18 AM
The first backhand grip is my Semi-western FH grip except that I´ve flipped it over to the backhand side, so I´m holding the racquet exactly like I do on my 2 SW Forehand (atleast I think they are semi-western fh grips...) pictures and in the second BH picture I´ve turned it more towards the continental grip so I think it's a Western fh or Eastern backhand depending on how you flip it :P I´m so confused.

mucat
10-11-2006, 10:00 AM
That's one dirty grip...

mclee025
10-11-2006, 11:36 AM
The answer to your original question is that, yes it is OK to flip your racquet over to essentially "switch" between your forehand and backhand grips without having to change the hand position on the racquet handle itself.

From the pics, your forehand grip does look like a semiwestern forehand grip.
However, as stated by others prevously, grips can be in between two types of grips. It's hard to tell from just a few pics. So your grip might be might be between a semiwestern forehand or western forehand.

That really doesn't matter, because it works for you whatever someone else calls it. The point is that you can flip the racquet with this grip 180 degrees and you have what you use as your backhand grip. Again, that is OK.

To me, your backhand grip from your flipped forehand grip looks like a very extreme eastern backhand. It might be heading towards a simiwestern backhand.

Ripper
10-11-2006, 11:45 AM
Regardless of the pics and the rest, if you take a semiwestern grip and, whithout re-gripping, flip the raquet to the backhand side to hit with the same face as with the forehand, that's an extreme eastern backhand grip. It's what JHH and a bunch of other pros with great backands use (I'm not saying that they don't re-grip, when switching from forehand to backhand; they do re-grip, for some reason... I don't; I do like you) In other words, it's a great backhand grip... but BEWARE; it's not easy to master. It took me a full year. When I started fooling around with it, my backhand shots were loopy and light. Now, they're lightning fast and HEAVY. I can hit very dramatic winners and provoke unforced errors with it.

Janne
10-11-2006, 01:21 PM
Thank you mclee025 and Ripper, thank you very much! And yes, the grip is really dirty. I dont use overgrips and I havent changed the original grip since I got the racquet which is ~5 months ago + my hands usually get quite sweatty when playing, especially when it was 25+ degrees outside. :)

drakulie
10-11-2006, 02:10 PM
What backhand is this:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v160/JanneK/tennis/1HBType1.jpg

And this:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v160/JanneK/tennis/1HBType2.jpg



The first one is between an eastern to extreme eastern.

The second one is more of a continental but leaning a little towards eastern.

Bungalo Bill
10-11-2006, 02:26 PM
When I use the SW grip for the forehand and get a ball back to the backhand side I dont switch grips, instead I just flip the racquet and it's in a Eastern backhand grip, is this right or have I messed the grips up somehow? :P

That's a negative good buddy.

If you are in a true SW grip for the forehand and you were to keep your hand in the same position, flip the racquet and hit on the same side of the strings you would be in what is now called an Extreme Backhand grip. Some call it an Extreme Eastern Backhand grip.

In general, placing your racquet face perpendicular to the ground and for hitting a backhand, if you place the base knuckle of the index finger on the top panel that is technically a FULL EASTERN BACKHAND grip. Some call it an Eastern backhand grip. Some say the Eastern backhand grip is slightly more towards Continental. Your EXTREME BACKHAND grip places the PALM behind the handle rather than the thumb. The Full eastern towards Continental places the thumb more behind the handle. Comprende? :confused:

Janne
10-11-2006, 03:06 PM
Yup, I get it now BB. :) Man is Talk Tennis a great forum or what?

Bungalo Bill
10-11-2006, 03:08 PM
Yup, I get it now BB. :) Man is Talk Tennis a great forum or what?

I only like it when I am in a heated argument. Otherwise, it is same ol' boring tip after another. :(

drakulie
10-11-2006, 03:16 PM
I only like it when I am in a heated argument. Otherwise, it is same ol' boring tip after another. :(

LMAO!

limitup
10-11-2006, 07:34 PM
Someone, somehow, needs to come up with a better way to reference grips. After all these years it's amazing how everyone still gets confused when talking about backhand grips.

If you are in a true SW grip for the forehand and you were to keep your hand in the same position, flip the racquet and hit on the same side of the strings you would be in what is now called an Extreme Backhand grip. Some call it an Extreme Eastern Backhand grip.

Some also call that a Semi-Western backhand.

Let the heated arguments begin!

Bungalo Bill
10-12-2006, 07:47 AM
Someone, somehow, needs to come up with a better way to reference grips. After all these years it's amazing how everyone still gets confused when talking about backhand grips.



Some also call that a Semi-Western backhand.

Let the heated arguments begin!

It will never end. Grips are weird. I have seen three different hand positions for the Eastern backhand grip.

Thankfully, I think everyone knows the Continental and the Eastern forehand grip.

maverick1
10-12-2006, 08:23 AM
It will never end. Grips are weird. I have seen three different hand positions for the Eastern backhand grip.

Thankfully, I think everyone knows the Continental and the Eastern forehand grip.

Having taken Tennis seriously only for last year or so(didn't even know continental or eastern) and been exposed to all this confusion recently, my opinion is that
the grip description method of locating the "base knuckle of the index finger" as you did above is the clearest by far. I am surprised someone with as forceful a voice as yourself hasn't stomped out every other system by now :)

To go with descriptions like Eastern BH, continental, etc, there should also be a number associated with each grip based on which bevel the index knuckle is on. That would make it easier to talk about grips in intermediate & Advanced instruction. If you keep the racket face perperdicular to the ground and call the top bevel #1, and go clockwise(looking from the butt),
1 - Eastern BH
2 - Continental
3 - Eastern FH
4 - Semi-Western FH
5 - Full western FH
6 - Hawaiian FH ??
7 - Not used ??
8 - Extreme eastern BH

Bungalo Bill
10-12-2006, 01:25 PM
Having taken Tennis seriously only for last year or so(didn't even know continental or eastern) and been exposed to all this confusion recently, my opinion is that
the grip description method of locating the "base knuckle of the index finger" as you did above is the clearest by far. I am surprised someone with as forceful a voice as yourself hasn't stomped out every other system by now :)

Haha, well, there is a bit of a purest in me as well. So it is hard for me to get too intense on the subject. For many players, it is difficult to know grips using two points of reference. To me it leaves out the many different hand sizes and the preferences of players wanting to use larger or smaller grips. For me, the base knuckle of the index finger is simple and "close enough".

However, I love arguing with "certain" people on this board - about four of them. Even though 99% of my "strong posts" towards them I am usually laughing while I write them, I like rattling their cages, spinning them around, getting them all jumpy, disproving them, making them explain themselves better, and watching them cry. :) :p

Ripper
10-16-2006, 08:03 AM
However, I love arguing with "certain" people on this board - about four of them. Even though 99% of my "strong posts" towards them I am usually laughing while I write them, I like rattling their cages, spinning them around, getting them all jumpy, disproving them, making them explain themselves better, and watching them cry. :) :p

Lol. Sometimes, I do this, too; it's fun!