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View Full Version : Is my Yonex RDS 001 strung right?


gfdoto
10-10-2006, 09:57 PM
I don't know much about stringing, but I remember reading somewhere that if you string a racquet two piece you should have four knots. The TW specs say the Yonex RDS 001 should be strung two piece, but I only see 2 knots on the current string job (I bought it used). Is my racquet strung incorrectly? If so, how does it affect the racquet or the way it plays? If not, how should I go about verifying whether a stringer is string my racquet correctly in the future? Any sites with things to look for? Thanks for the help.

snoflewis
10-10-2006, 10:22 PM
I don't know much about stringing, but I remember reading somewhere that if you string a racquet two piece you should have four knots. The TW specs say the Yonex RDS 001 should be strung two piece, but I only see 2 knots on the current string job (I bought it used). Is my racquet strung incorrectly? If so, how does it affect the racquet or the way it plays? If not, how should I go about verifying whether a stringer is string my racquet correctly in the future? Any sites with things to look for? Thanks for the help.

Here's a picture of the string job. Go here and click on "All sizes" to see the full size picture.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gfdoto/266703690/

the racket looks like it was indeed strung 1 piece, when it's recommended that the stringer use 2 piece stringing. the reason for this is that when you string it traditionally, the crosses start at the throat, and stringing the crosses from bottom up isnt good for the racket since it can break the racket. however, to prevent this, some stringers still use 1 piece but a method called ATW (i think it stands for around the world?). the ATW 1 piece method allows the stringer to string w/ one piece of string while still stringing the crosses top down...if this is the case w/ your rds001 mid, it's fine, but if it's not, then i'd cut it out.

i've never strung a racket ATW because im fine w/ using 2 pieces of string, so if you want to know whether or not your racket was strung ATW, you should ask the more established stringers on this board like diredesire.

hope this helps you a little bit.

gfdoto
10-10-2006, 10:38 PM
Now you have me worried. Can any experts chime in on this?

godot
10-10-2006, 11:40 PM
What's your tension? I incorrectly strung my RDS 001 MP at 50lbs one piece and there is no problem. But next time, I will do 2 pieces.

Fishbulb
10-11-2006, 02:16 AM
I would suggest restringing. Supposed to be 2 Piece stringing


http://www.yonexusa.com/images/tennis/String_Inst_rds001.jpg

Ripper
10-11-2006, 05:22 AM
Now you have me worried. Can any experts chime in on this?

What's your tension? I incorrectly strung my RDS 001 MP at 50lbs one piece and there is no problem. But next time, I will do 2 pieces.

gfdoto and godot, it's funny how similar your usernames are... Anyway, gfdoto, godot is right, what's done is done. The raquet should be strung 2 piece, but it was strung 1 piece. You can't go back in time. So, don't freak out. Had it have broken, it would have been a problem, but it didn't. Just do it 2 piece the next time.

Edit: Both of you use the same frames and both have them, incorrectly, strung 1 piece... Funny...

Richie Rich
10-11-2006, 05:31 AM
an easy way to tell if your racquet is strung ATW properly is look at the last main. one of the last (most outer) mains will have to be started from the bottom cross. also, since you have 18 crosses, the last main will have to be used to tie off the knot at the top of the frame. this is pretty easy to see. if this is the case your racquet was strung correctly and will not harm the frame.

if you still have doubts cut out the strings and restring properly

gfdoto
10-11-2006, 08:01 AM
an easy way to tell if your racquet is strung ATW properly is look at the last main. one of the last (most outer) mains will have to be started from the bottom cross. also, since you have 18 crosses, the last main will have to be used to tie off the knot at the top of the frame. this is pretty easy to see. if this is the case your racquet was strung correctly and will not harm the frame.

if you still have doubts cut out the strings and restring properly
I have confirmed that one of the last mains is started from the bottom cross.

I'm looking at the top of the racquet and I do believe the last main was used to tie off at the top. The last main comes up out of the racquet and back down onto the third main for the tie off. This last main also happens to be the one that started from the bottom cross.

Does that sound right?

Thanks again for the help, I really appreciate it.

Valjean
10-11-2006, 08:12 AM
I hope you string yourself.

Althought the widespread use of hybrids is changing this slowly, it's sometimes hard to find a shop willing to do two-piece. And there's no guarantee you'll find ATW either.

Richie Rich
10-11-2006, 09:06 AM
I have confirmed that one of the last mains is started from the bottom cross.

I'm looking at the top of the racquet and I do believe the last main was used to tie off at the top. The last main comes up out of the racquet and back down onto the third main for the tie off. This last main also happens to be the one that started from the bottom cross.

Does that sound right?

Thanks again for the help, I really appreciate it.

without seeing the frame it sounds ok. if it was strung wrong the tie off at the top would be from the last cross.

gfdoto
10-11-2006, 09:11 AM
I can take some pictures of the frame tonight when I get home from work.

gfdoto
10-11-2006, 09:29 AM
I sent an email to the shop that I normally go to to get my racquet restrung and here is the response:

We will string your racket however you would prefer, be it one piece or two
piece...Yonex does recommend a 2-piece stringing for their frames because of
the square head shape, and even used to recommend stringing the mains 10%
tighter than the crosses because of their added length. Because of the
technology that has gone into the newer high-end stringing machines in the
last couple of years (constant pull), this is no longer necessary, and makes
the 2-piece stringing optional as well. Unless requested, we string all
rackets 1-piece, due to the fact that a 1-piece holds tension better than a
2-piece. The more knots, the more tension lost. That being said, if you
prefer a 2-piece stringing, that is very easy to do, and no problem at all!
We have a number of guys who string with us regularly who insist on a
2-piece stringing, even if it is not recommended by the manufacturer.

I'm not familiar with the contant pull technology that he is referring to. Can anybody confirm that this is true? He did not mention the ATW technique at all. I know nothing about stringing so I just wanted to make sure that what he's saying is actually true.

If I wanted to have two different tensions for mains vs crosses it would have to be a two piece job, right?

Valjean
10-11-2006, 10:37 AM
It's the gobbledygook I said you'd get. "Machine technology" can have nothing to do with the requirement that the racquet be strung top-down, which is what the two-piece requirement in this case is meant to ensure. And in fact Yonex still does require that the mains be pulled differently than the crosses on many of their frames; the standard is now 5% lower for the crosses. This applies to the RDS 001. That one-piece holds tension "better" than two-piece is at least debatable; some would argue the two-piece method produces not only a more consistent stringbed, but a steadier tension hold. It is never wise to underestimate how greed can and does work to undermine any process, even one the manufacturer specifies, as here. The time differential for two-piece is so marginal, yet it's like moving a mountain to get it.

You asked, and it is possible to do the mains and the crosses differently using the one-piece method, so you still need to specify two-piece to 'em.

gfdoto
10-11-2006, 10:56 AM
Another response from the stringer:

If you would like to use a different tension on the mains and crosses, the racket must be strung 2-piece, otherwise there will be more stress on one side of the frame than others, the tension will not be evenly distributed throughout the head, and you will risk breaking the frame. Around the world is something that a few guys do on tour, but honestly, I've played with frames strung one piece, as well as one around the world, side by side, and there is little to no perceptible difference. Today's machines are designed to protect the racket as well as decrease stress on them while stringing. Combine that with the constant pull, which takes the slack out of every string when pulled, giving an extremely true and accurate stringing, there is no such thing as a mandatory 2-piece these days. Some rackets are easier to string 2-piece because of their patterns, but because of the reasoning above, can definitely be strung 1-piece with no harm to the frame.

:confused:

I guess it should be safe as long if I tell them to string it two piece.

Richie Rich
10-11-2006, 11:07 AM
Another response from the stringer:



:confused:

I guess it should be safe as long if I tell them to string it two piece.
good idea. why take any chances? doesn't seem like they want to spend the extra time to make sure they string AWL correctly.

that being said, even if you request 2 piece you can't be sure they do it right (top down) unless you watch them do it in front of you.

Valjean
10-11-2006, 11:12 AM
Having gotten quite technical, though, with this one, trust this: you'd be better off taking it somewhere else/stringing it yourself now. These don't tend to like scrutiny.

gfdoto
10-11-2006, 12:42 PM
I am seriously considering getting my own machine for stringing but my main concern is that if I don't know enough to make sure I don't screw up myself. Does this picture provide enough information for me to string my own RDS 001 correctly?

http://www.yonexusa.com/images/tennis/String_Inst_rds001.jpg

I do have some old racquets that I can practice on since I don't want to screw up the brand new RDS 001 that I have. Guess I'll have to read up on it some more. Any good resources for learning how to string?

Valjean
10-11-2006, 12:44 PM
This site has video instruction: http://www.sptennis.com. And the USRSA has a stringing video out, too...

bsandy
10-11-2006, 02:18 PM
Your fine. It's ATW.

Most tournament stringers use ATW unless otherwise specified (or it's going to be a hybrid).

. . . Bud

Richie Rich
10-11-2006, 02:20 PM
Your fine. It's ATW.

Most tournament stringers use ATW unless otherwise specified (or it's going to be a hybrid).

. . . Bud

i think the key words are "tournament stringers". they will know to use AWL. it's the rest of the stringers that won't know who are the dangerous ones :smile:

Richie Rich
10-11-2006, 02:23 PM
I am seriously considering getting my own machine for stringing but my main concern is that if I don't know enough to make sure I don't screw up myself.

i got my own stringer a few years ago and haven't been happier. stringing properly isn't too hard and you pick it up very quickly. i had a couple issues in the beginning that were caused by improper mounting of the frame but since then no problems. you can be as fast or as slow as you want too - it's your own time.

Stan
10-11-2006, 06:18 PM
Any Yonex racquet can be strung with one piece provided it is strung using an Around the World method. What's most important with the isometric shape is that the crosses are strung from top to bottom. The entire reason Yonex recommends two piece stringing is because almost everyone with half of an iota of sense will string two piece crosses starting at the top. There's just too much left to chance to suggest one piece ATW...if the stringer does not know ATW and strings bottom up, the isometric head could experience damage leading to premature breakage.

Bottom line. If a Yonex is strung one piece with an ATW pattern, no problem. If a Yonex is strung with crosses bottom up...well in that case you have a problem.

gfdoto
10-11-2006, 07:26 PM
Anyway to tell if a racquet has been strung bottom up vs top to bottom by just looking at the strings? Or is it just the sequence of stringing that puts extra pressure on the frame during stringing?

Richie Rich
10-11-2006, 07:35 PM
Anyway to tell if a racquet has been strung bottom up vs top to bottom by just looking at the strings? Or is it just the sequence of stringing that puts extra pressure on the frame during stringing?

on a racquet that has even number of crosses like yours if the tie off at the top of the frame is made from the last/top cross then they have strung bottom up. makes it easy.

on a racquet with odd number of crosses it makes it harder since an AWL method and a bottom up stringing will both use the top cross as the tie off string.

stringing bottom up forces pressure to the top of the frame where it is structurally weaker than the throat area. some racquet mfgs say no problem to string bottom up but i've seen yonex's and babolat's (drives, storms) crack from stringing bottom up. as a general rule, i never string bottom up even if the mfg says ok to do so.

dancraig
10-11-2006, 07:39 PM
on a racquet that has even number of crosses like yours if the tie off at the top of the frame is made from the last/top cross then they have strung bottom up. makes it easy.

on a racquet with odd number of crosses it makes it harder since an AWL method and a bottom up stringing will both use the top cross as the tie off string.

stringing bottom up forces pressure to the top of the frame where it is structurally weaker than the throat area. some racquet mfgs say no problem to string bottom up but i've seen yonex's and babolat's (drives, storms) crack from stringing bottom up. as a general rule, i never string bottom up even if the mfg says ok to do so.

Rich:
Do you mean you have seen them break on the machine or later on as the racquet is played with? Thanks.

gfdoto
10-12-2006, 01:34 PM
Well, I bit the bullet and bought my own stringing machine (SP Swing). Looking forward to stringing my own racquet!

Thanks for all the help on this thread.

Richie Rich
10-12-2006, 02:31 PM
Rich:
Do you mean you have seen them break on the machine or later on as the racquet is played with? Thanks.
they have both broke while on the machine being strung. and both cracked at the 10/2 o'clock position - right where the top of the frame bends. must be a weak spot on certain frames

Richie Rich
10-12-2006, 02:32 PM
Well, I bit the bullet and bought my own stringing machine (SP Swing). Looking forward to stringing my own racquet!

Thanks for all the help on this thread.
congrats! you won't regret it. :smile:

Valjean
10-12-2006, 03:08 PM
Well, I bit the bullet and bought my own stringing machine (SP Swing).....
Great. Now you just need to acquire a few extra assets to complete the stringer's tool kit you'll need, and you can start stringing yourself! I'm recommending a starting clamp, inexpensive bubble balance (to determine when your dropweight tension arm is horizontal; it's available from any hardware store), and Stringmeter (to monitor, compare and, of course, measure tension in the strung racquet).

gfdoto
10-12-2006, 03:23 PM
Do you have a place you recommend for getting the starting clamp and the string meter? How much do these things normally go for?

What is a starting clamp used for?

Sorry, now we're getting a little off topic.

Richie Rich
10-12-2006, 04:57 PM
Do you have a place you recommend for getting the starting clamp and the string meter? How much do these things normally go for?

What is a starting clamp used for?

Sorry, now we're getting a little off topic.

i like babolat starting clamps the best. i've tried gamma ones before but they lose their "grip" and don't hold as well as the babolat ones, which seem to last forever. they are not cheap though but with stringers tools you get what you pay for and quality will last you a long time.

Valjean
10-13-2006, 02:49 AM
Do you have a place you recommend for getting the starting clamp and the string meter? How much do these things normally go for?....
What's wrong with right here, too... http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/toolssupplies.html

Even though Babolat makes the best starting clamp out there, Alpha also makes a very good, sturdy, less expensive clamp that goes for around $35. A starting clamp can have several uses, the most noteworthy for you being that you can clamp the first of the two middle main strings against the outside of the frame when you start to string. If you download the user's manual for your new stringing machine, you'll see that the alternative is more complex, time-consuming and less likely to produce a reliable, consistent outcome.

XFactorer
10-13-2006, 11:59 PM
:-( I just strung my Yonex RDS 001 with some more Luxilon Big Banger ALU Power... one piece... and the crosses started at the bottom of the string bed new the throat... I hope it doens't crack.

Valjean
10-14-2006, 06:04 AM
You sound like an extreme sports fan, anyhow!

kirbster123
10-22-2006, 10:43 AM
I have a Yonex RDS 001 MidPlus and where does it say that it has to be 2-piece stringing? I just strung it with NXT @ 60 pounds, and it turned out fine.

Will888
10-22-2006, 12:13 PM
I have a Yonex RDS 001 MidPlus and where does it say that it has to be 2-piece stringing? I just strung it with NXT @ 60 pounds, and it turned out fine.

HERE (http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCYONEX-RDS001.html) look under string pattern, and that will tell you to use two pieces.

And does anyone know if Yonex recommends to string the crosses 2 pounds looser than the mains? I just put on BB Original at 57, and I need to know if I'm stringing my RDS MP correctly.

gfdoto
10-22-2006, 02:01 PM
Yonex still recommends a 5% drop in cross tension, but it is not required.

Will888
10-22-2006, 08:37 PM
Yonex still recommends a 5% drop in cross tension, but it is not required.

did you see that on their website? Because I'm trying to find official proof to see if it is true.

gfdoto
10-22-2006, 08:46 PM
did you see that on their website? Because I'm trying to find official proof to see if it is true.
Nope, I did not see this on their website but someone on another thread said that he called Yonex and that's what they told him.

Will888
10-22-2006, 08:49 PM
Nope, I did not see this on their website but someone on another thread said that he called Yonex and that's what they told him.
ooo, so this is second hand information. It's probably true, and I understand why they would recomend stringing 5% less. But I thought the crosses are looser anyway because when you string the crosses, friction causes them tobe not as tight as you set it to be and it looses 1-2 pounds. Or am I wrong.:(