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View Full Version : Need a good ball pocket(Dwell Time) String


FedBlake
10-12-2006, 08:08 AM
My wife began playing tennis a couple of years ago. She has made it to the 3.5 level. I need a string that offers good dwell time and contorl without tearing her arm apart. ANY SUGGESTIONS

Kevo
10-12-2006, 08:40 AM
Wilson Sensation is a nice soft string with good pocketing. Should do nicely for someone who isn't going to break strings very often. Especially the 17g version.

Ripper
10-12-2006, 09:14 AM
If money is not an issue, how about nat gut?

tennis-skater
10-12-2006, 09:20 AM
yeah nat gut is the best thing for the elbow and if she doesnt really it to hard it shouldnt break that fast especially if u get like a 16 gauge

phat
10-12-2006, 09:43 AM
Gut is the best. & Rip control 16 is pretty good too.

Keifers
10-12-2006, 10:24 AM
Nat gut is probably the best in terms of ball pocketing. It has great elasticity, which allows the ball to "push" into the string bed, and excellent resiliency or rebound, which "repulses" the ball from the string bed -- all the while providing an excellent feel of what the strings are doing with the ball.

Among the synthetics, I've found Gamma Revelation 17 to pocket quite nicely. It just doesn't provide the same amount of feedback that nat gut provides (the Revelation feels more muted).

Good luck.

psp2
10-12-2006, 12:14 PM
Another vote for natural gut. It's the best you're going to get for ball pocketing. Tecnifibre X1 Biphase is also wonderful.

Gundam
10-12-2006, 12:34 PM
How about e-matrix?

andrew_b
10-12-2006, 07:44 PM
For a player at the 3.5 level I would hesitate to "automatically" recommend natural gut. While everyone who's mentioned it is correct, it DOES have the best "ball pocketing" feel and forgiveness, I wouldn't recommend it because it is prone to early breakage from off center hits.

That said, though, you know your wife's game. If she regularly hits the ball in the center of the frame (or nearly, at least), then gut would be the ultimate choice for feel and comfort. But if she's hitting shots off the edge of the stringbed/frame on any kind of regular basis, you're going to be unhappy with that $40+ gut string job, because gut just doesn't have the torsional strength to withstand that and it will break prematurely.

If you decide against gut, I'd suggest a soft multi, something like Wilson NXT or NXT Tour, Technifibre NRG2, or Babolat ExCel. She can likely handle a thinner gauge string, which will also increase the "softness" of the string. something like a 17, or even 18, gauge.

Play well,
Andrew

Keifers
10-12-2006, 10:54 PM
Respectfully disagree with andrew b's assertion that nat gut is "prone to early breakage from off center hits." At least, that's not been my experience - nor have I seen it happen to others - over many years.

Certainly, it would hurt the pocketbook more to lose a gut string job that way than a synthetic one. But this is not a special vulnerability of gut when compared with synthetics. Strings break far more often due to friction at the junctions between main and cross strings - and that applies to gut, monofilament and multifilament strings.

Apart from its sensitivity to moisture (i.e., it's guaranteed to fail when it gets wet), gut is quite durable. In fact, many use it because they find it lasts so long that its higher price is more than justified (comparing time between new string jobs).

andrew_b
10-13-2006, 12:30 PM
Respectfully disagree with andrew b's assertion that nat gut is "prone to early breakage from off center hits." At least, that's not been my experience - nor have I seen it happen to others - over many years.

Certainly, it would hurt the pocketbook more to lose a gut string job that way than a synthetic one. But this is not a special vulnerability of gut when compared with synthetics. Strings break far more often due to friction at the junctions between main and cross strings - and that applies to gut, monofilament and multifilament strings.

Apart from its sensitivity to moisture (i.e., it's guaranteed to fail when it gets wet), gut is quite durable. In fact, many use it because they find it lasts so long that its higher price is more than justified (comparing time between new string jobs).

Actually, USRSA testing shows that natural gut has a lower knot break strength than most (all? don't remember) synthetics. This is the same kind of tension you subject the string to when framing a shot. Thus my statement.

I'm not the only one with this opinion. There was an article published by the USRSA written by several highly respected string and stringing experts that talks about "Natural Gut Mysteries and Solutions". You can find the article on the well-known stringer site under the "stringing info" section. Or, a google search (http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLD,GGLD:2005-12,GGLD:en&q=natural+gut+mysteries+and+solutions)on the title will likely make it one of the top links.

Excellent article, and even if you don't all of read it I encourage you to scroll down to the last bullet point on the page.

play well,
Andrew

Midlife crisis
10-13-2006, 12:33 PM
My wife began playing tennis a couple of years ago. She has made it to the 3.5 level. I need a string that offers good dwell time and contorl without tearing her arm apart. ANY SUGGESTIONS

Control and long dwell time are actually at odds with each other. For the best control, you want the least dwell time. Adding dwell time usually implies more string elasticity, which means that incoming spin can assymetrically deflect the stringbed, resulting in a rebound angle that is not what you expect. Also, as you swing more vertically to generate spin, the longer dwell time will allow the ball to travel across the stringbed for a longer distance, which will generate a force that twists the racquet for a longer time as well since the entire contact patch cannot be centered on the long axis. This also results in unexpected rebound angles.

Gundam
10-13-2006, 01:13 PM
Control and long dwell time are actually at odds with each other. For the best control, you want the least dwell time. Adding dwell time usually implies more string elasticity, which means that incoming spin can assymetrically deflect the stringbed, resulting in a rebound angle that is not what you expect. Also, as you swing more vertically to generate spin, the longer dwell time will allow the ball to travel across the stringbed for a longer distance, which will generate a force that twists the racquet for a longer time as well since the entire contact patch cannot be centered on the long axis. This also results in unexpected rebound angles.

I like to think 'control' in two ways.
1. Directional control
2. Length of shot : In this case, I like to 'control' it with the amount of topspin. Hit it hard but with varying amount of spin. So, longer dwell time is critial for this kind of 'control'. And often I feel, this is the more important aspect of control than the 'directional'.

Keifers
10-13-2006, 04:38 PM
Actually, USRSA testing shows that natural gut has a lower knot break strength than most (all? don't remember) synthetics. This is the same kind of tension you subject the string to when framing a shot. Thus my statement.

I'm not the only one with this opinion. There was an article published by the USRSA written by several highly respected string and stringing experts that talks about "Natural Gut Mysteries and Solutions". You can find the article on the well-known stringer site under the "stringing info" section. Or, a google search (http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLD,GGLD:2005-12,GGLD:en&q=natural+gut+mysteries+and+solutions)on the title will likely make it one of the top links.

Excellent article, and even if you don't all of read it I encourage you to scroll down to the last bullet point on the page.

play well,
Andrew
Thanks for the link. I understand much better now the origins of your concern.

Here's what the last bullet point in that article says:

"Natural gut responds better at higher tensions because of its superior elasticity and hard hitting players will benefit more when using gut. Natural gut comes highly recommended for players with elbow or shoulder problems but be warned when recommending gut to lower NTRP rated players. Natural gut has lower knot break strength (threshold) than standard synthetics. This is the strings ability to resist angular forces, which is exactly what you have when a player frames a ball. Since this is more likely to occur with a less advanced player you may find yourself struggling to explain to your 2.5 player with arm problems just why their expensive string only lasted through 2 hours of play!"

I observe that the author(s) write about the possibility of 2.5 players being disappointed when their nat gut strings break because they framed the ball. They were not talking about 3.5 level players.

My concern here is that players should not be dissuaded from using nat gut by potential problems that, in practice, occur very rarely and only to lower-level players.

Anyone else want to share their experience of nat gut?

Valjean
10-13-2006, 04:57 PM
My wife began playing tennis a couple of years ago. She has made it to the 3.5 level. I need a string that offers good dwell time and contorl without tearing her arm apart. ANY SUGGESTIONS
I assume you do not string her racquet; isn't that so? So then, do you know what strings your local stringing outlet provides?

andrew_b
10-13-2006, 06:13 PM
Thanks for the link. I understand much better now the origins of your concern.
Thanks. ANd a tip 'o the tennis cap to you for the civility in the statement of your differing opinion :)

I observe that the author(s) write about the possibility of 2.5 players being disappointed when their nat gut strings break because they framed the ball. They were not talking about 3.5 level players.

My concern here is that players should not be dissuaded from using nat gut by potential problems that, in practice, occur very rarely and only to lower-level players.

I agree, which was why I tried in my initial post to get the OP to understand he had to look at his wife's game to decide whether gut was appropriate or not. I know a few 3.0/3.5 who I wouldn't recommend it to, and a few that I'd recommend it for without hesitation.

If you can consistently hit balls in or even near the sweet spot, and not frame shots often, then natural gut will give you the highest level of comfort over any other string. The other thing I'd note is that with gut, you get what you pay for. I'd suggest that, if you want to try it, you go with one of the known brands, and if you want to save a bit of money, go with one of the major known brands "value" line, such as Babolat Tonic+ or BDE Performance. Klip is also very reputable, but is a bit more crisp/stiff than the others.

play well,
Andrew

Midlife crisis
10-14-2006, 02:28 PM
I like to think 'control' in two ways.
1. Directional control
2. Length of shot : In this case, I like to 'control' it with the amount of topspin. Hit it hard but with varying amount of spin. So, longer dwell time is critial for this kind of 'control'. And often I feel, this is the more important aspect of control than the 'directional'.

Directional control (left/right) and length of shot (up/down) are really just different aspects of the same thing, which is consistency of rebound angle off the stringbed. Longer dwell time, because of greater string elasticity, is at odds with this. Though you might be able to control your depth with topspin, the ball angle coming of your strings will still be less variable with a less elastic string that causes shorter dwell time, all other factors being equal.