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View Full Version : What is the benefit of uneven tension?


gvanzky
10-20-2006, 10:39 AM
I string my racquets at 63lbs on mains & cross. what will i benefit if i will put 63lbs on the main & 61 on the cross. what will i expect besides more power. what will the racquet feel like?

alan-n
10-20-2006, 11:33 AM
Try it and find out for yourself, there is no exact scientific explanation since everyone hits the ball differently and feel things differently in different racquets.

TonyB
10-20-2006, 11:45 AM
It's supposed to feel less "boardy." At least that's my understanding.

I do it just because I'm "supposed to." I'm not sure I see a difference, but I definitely don't see anything negative in doing it, so I'll continue to do it.

tennis_nerd22
10-20-2006, 12:27 PM
well stringing the crosses lower than the mains is supposed to make the sweetspot a bit bigger, and in my experience it does. but you have to see for yourself.

another thing is when hybriding with a softer elastic string (like syn gut) and a harsh stiff string (poly) then you string the elastic one a bit lower (when its on the cross anyways), so that there's less stress on the frame.

gvanzky
10-20-2006, 12:29 PM
thanx guys! m going to try it anyways.

DADYO
10-20-2006, 12:35 PM
just a question: this only works in stringing hybrids, am I right??

tennis_nerd22
10-20-2006, 12:43 PM
just a question: this only works in stringing hybrids, am I right??

no it can work for anything. but i think if your going to try just to see how it feels, try it for full jobs of the same string first to get an idea of what differences in main/cross tensions do.

byealmeens
10-20-2006, 01:09 PM
I string my racquets at 63lbs on mains & cross. what will i benefit if i will put 63lbs on the main & 61 on the cross. what will i expect besides more power. what will the racquet feel like?
Another reason this is done is for a more "even" or consistent stringbed. The theory is that since mains are longer you should string them a bit tighter to get them at the same tension as the crosses. Of course, if you're not sensitive to string tension, none of this will matter....

rscottdds
10-20-2006, 01:59 PM
another thing is when hybriding with a softer elastic string (like syn gut) and a harsh stiff string (poly) then you string the elastic one a bit lower (when its on the cross anyways), so that there's less stress on the frame.

I thought there was more to it than just creating less stress on the frame. I know Babolat says to string the x's 4lbs tighter than the mains when using a poly/syn gut hybrid. I don't think they are too concerned with frame stress as they say its OK to string the crosses from the bottom up on a one piece.
-Robert

psp2
10-20-2006, 02:59 PM
Another reason this is done is for a more "even" or consistent stringbed. The theory is that since mains are longer you should string them a bit tighter to get them at the same tension as the crosses. Of course, if you're not sensitive to string tension, none of this will matter....

This so called "theory" is such nonsense. 60 lbs. of tension is 60 lbs. of tension whether the string is 12" long or 10" long. Perhaps you are misinterpreting the so-called theory in your explanation above.

Now, if you're talking about string deflection/deformation difference between a 12" string and 10" string under the same tension (subject to an equal force), then there will indeed be a difference.

gvanzky
10-20-2006, 09:44 PM
i tried today w/ my racquet at 64lbs on mains and 61 on crosses and i used to string my racquet at 63lbs. it feels alot softer and i like it. the question now is, will it affect the durability of the racquet? will it deform the shape in the long run? and what is the recommended maximun difference between the mains and crosses?

psamp14
10-20-2006, 09:57 PM
i tried today w/ my racquet at 64lbs on mains and 61 on crosses and i used to string my racquet at 63lbs. it feels alot softer and i like it. the question now is, will it affect the durability of the racquet? will it deform the shape in the long run? and what is the recommended maximun difference between the mains and crosses?


thats what popped up on my mind as well...will stringing like say 50 on the mains and 48 on the crosses deform the frame? making it look more lengthy or wider if done oppositely like 50 on mains and 52 on crosses...

is this okay on the frame?

gvanzky
10-20-2006, 10:11 PM
thats what popped up on my mind as well...will stringing like say 50 on the mains and 48 on the crosses deform the frame? making it look more lengthy or wider if done oppositely like 50 on mains and 52 on crosses...

is this okay on the frame?

i strung mine today at 64lbs mains & 62lbs crosses, but it did not deformed my racquet "hps 6.1". but in the long run, that would be my ???

snoflewis
10-20-2006, 11:07 PM
i strung mine today at 64lbs mains & 62lbs crosses, but it did not deformed my racquet "hps 6.1". but in the long run, that would be my ???

it's been said that 2-4 lbs is ok. yonex actually recommends a 5% decrease in the tension of the crosses only, which is usually about 3 lbs. it helps it to feel less boardy like someone else said

Pusher
10-21-2006, 05:21 AM
I find that stringing crosses about 4 lbs tighter than the mains extends the strings' durability. Of course that needs to be adjusted if you're using a hybrid.

fishuuuuu
10-21-2006, 07:41 AM
I string my racquets 2 lbs. higher in the crosses to prevent squashing.

prostaff1
10-21-2006, 02:21 PM
Are any of you guys actually good players?
It certainly sounds like you are all beginners and therefore, should learn how to play first before trying all of these hybrids and stringing techniques.
If you are below a 5.5 player, most likely you won't notice such subtle differences anyhow, so just go hit the ball.

fishuuuuu
10-21-2006, 02:35 PM
Are any of you guys actually good players?
It certainly sounds like you are all beginners and therefore, should learn how to play first before trying all of these hybrids and stringing techniques.
If you are below a 5.5 player, most likely you won't notice such subtle differences anyhow, so just go hit the ball.

But we do notice, even the lowly 4.0 and 4.5 players. Thanks for thinking about us though :rolleyes:

jonolau
10-21-2006, 05:12 PM
Imagine your racquet as a perfect circle:

If your mains are at a higher tension than the crosses, this will pull the 6 & 12 o'clock positions closer, thereby turning the circle into an oval lying on it's side.

If your crosses are higher than mains, it will pull 3 & 9 closer together, making it look like an oval sitting on it's sharper ends.

The racquet frame will flex naturally and this should not affect the structural integrity.

alan-n
10-21-2006, 06:38 PM
Are any of you guys actually good players?
It certainly sounds like you are all beginners and therefore, should learn how to play first before trying all of these hybrids and stringing techniques.
If you are below a 5.5 player, most likely you won't notice such subtle differences anyhow, so just go hit the ball.

You have to be a 5.5 in your little world to notice the difference between strings, wow you are an amazing unranked player. Wow. Wow again. Did I mention wow? Wow.

gvanzky
10-21-2006, 08:06 PM
Are any of you guys actually good players?
It certainly sounds like you are all beginners and therefore, should learn how to play first before trying all of these hybrids and stringing techniques.
If you are below a 5.5 player, most likely you won't notice such subtle differences anyhow, so just go hit the ball.

yes! maybe we are just 5.5 below players. but we must also look for the best way for us to appreciate our racquets and feel the ball better. and if we find the right feel that we like then that's the time we can hit the ball more. And maybe we can surpass your 5.5 thing;) .

that's good! maybe your 5.5 and above. and why don't you share your knowledge and expertise instead or your just to good for us all. yahooo!!!! good for u.

plarazza
10-22-2006, 02:48 AM
I was told that the mains should be a little less then the crosses to get the power. The crosses being tighter provide the control.

But then with polys and other strings itsrecommended to have mains tighter then teh crosses so yer

byealmeens
10-23-2006, 09:23 AM
This so called "theory" is such nonsense. 60 lbs. of tension is 60 lbs. of tension whether the string is 12" long or 10" long. Perhaps you are misinterpreting the so-called theory in your explanation above.

Now, if you're talking about string deflection/deformation difference between a 12" string and 10" string under the same tension (subject to an equal force), then there will indeed be a difference.
The "theory" I was referring to was consistency of the stringbed. This is something that is totally subjective - some believe it "feels" better, others don't think it makes any difference. Much like stringing two-piece versus one-piece. Some string two-piece even when it's not really required because they feel the stringbed is more "consistent". This is referring to tension LOSS during and after the stringing process.

But thanks for pointing out that I did not understand the "theory", and for clarifying what tension and deflection mean. If you get a chance, please check this post and others for spelling mistakes and improper grammar as well. Feedback like yours is very useful. Keep up the good work!

psp2
10-23-2006, 09:30 AM
The "theory" I was referring to was consistency of the stringbed. This is something that is totally subjective - some believe it "feels" better, others don't think it makes any difference. Much like stringing two-piece versus one-piece. Some string two-piece even when it's not really required because they feel the stringbed is more "consistent". This is referring to tension LOSS during and after the stringing process.

But thanks for pointing out that I did not understand the "theory", and for clarifying what tension and deflection mean. If you get a chance, please check this post and others for spelling mistakes and improper grammar as well. Feedback like yours is very useful. Keep up the good work!

If you felt that strongly about it, you should have made sure you got your thoughts across correctly in the first place.

The way your post was worded was totally incorrect. A newbie would read your post and think that the equal tension in the main and the cross wouldn't exist because of their length differences.

byealmeens
10-23-2006, 09:35 AM
i tried today w/ my racquet at 64lbs on mains and 61 on crosses and i used to string my racquet at 63lbs. it feels alot softer and i like it. the question now is, will it affect the durability of the racquet? will it deform the shape in the long run? and what is the recommended maximun difference between the mains and crosses?
I like it as well. I've found I can string at a lot lower tension as a result, because the increased tension in the crosses help provide a little more control. I string my crosses at 6 lbs difference but there are others that string between 15-20 lbs difference. Yes, at higher differences you actually notice a change in shape, but at 6 lbs difference I have never noticed any difference and never encountered any problems. If you like the feel, I recommend you experiment a little. You may find bigger differences suit your game....

byealmeens
10-23-2006, 09:39 AM
If you felt that strongly about it, you should have made sure you got your thoughts across correctly in the first place.

The way your post was worded was totally incorrect. A newbie would read your post and think that the equal tension in the main and the cross wouldn't exist because of their length differences.
You are right - please forgive me! Is there a fine associated with this? Where do I send the money?

tlm
11-30-2006, 06:56 PM
I was taught that the x's should be 2-4 lbs tighter because of all the friction they get from being pulled through the mains.If you straighten your strings out after stringing notice how easy the x's move compared to the mains.

As far as having to be a 5.5 player to be able to tell the difference in strings+tensions, that is b.s. I would say maybe the fist few years you learn you couldnt tell much, but even a good 3.5 or 4.0 can tell a difference in strings.

I have noticed that the flat hitters with eastern grips dont notice as much difference as topspin hitters with sw grips.

Roforot
11-30-2006, 08:15 PM
In a book, Technical Tennis, they describe an experiment where players from all levels low to high were given 4 hits each w/ two racquets. One strung at 50lbs and another at 70lbs. They were not allowed to touch the strings, and a string dampener was already placed

In this study, they found many players could not discern 20lbs of difference based on feel/shock and that many players incorrectly named the higher tension for the lower and vice versa. This study included players that were described as semiprofessional (so 5.5 at least).

This is not to argue that tension or hybrids won't make a difference, but probably not as much as we would like to think. Rather it is someting to tinker with and it can make the game more fun.

BTW, there was a fellow here who used to talk about "Stretching a racquet head" by purposely stringing the Xs lower.... it provoked quite a discussion. I don't think you're going to damage your frame; Yonex used to rec. 5% lower tension on crosses before.

Ripper
12-01-2006, 06:42 AM
Ok, I know, as always, that this may end up lost here within the sea of posts, but, for what it's worth, I'll share the truth with y'all. I'll use an example. If you string your crosses at 58 pounds and your mains at 60, that's not the reference tension they'll end up with. No, my friends. The tension they'll end up with is an even 59 (thanks to the poster who opened up my eyes some time ago... forgot who it was). However, there are differences between stringing crosses/mains at 58/60 and stringing an all around 59. First of all, the head form will be altered. In the previous example, the head would be squashed, but, if you do the crosses tighter, the head would be stretched. Eventhough, the squashing or stretching of the head would change the length of the raquet in just a couple of milimeters, it does have a small effect on the balance, meaning that the raquet may swing a bit differently. Also, this squashing or stretching of the head will have the effect of pre-loading the head. In other words, you would be storing energy in the head to put power on the ball. Hummm, I think I may be leaving out a couple of things, but, in general, this is the truth of why stringing crosses and mains with different tensions can give raquets a different feel.

SteveI
12-02-2006, 02:54 AM
You are right - please forgive me! Is there a fine associated with this? Where do I send the money?


Yes,

Send it to: WayTooSeriousAboutTennis@getalife@com... LOL I will be happy to collect all the cash and buy more strings and frames and shoes.. and lessons.. and quit my job... move to FL... :-)... And BTW.. my 12 year old Middle School daughter can tell the difference when I change tensions and string on her frames.. just like she can tell when her piano is out of tune. You do not have to be a great player to notice or optimize your equipment to get the most out of your talents. It also adds to the fun of being involved in the sport of tennis (or at least that is how I justify all the tennis stuff I own..LOL)

Have a great day.

Steve

Steve

chess9
12-02-2006, 04:05 AM
Are any of you guys actually good players?
It certainly sounds like you are all beginners and therefore, should learn how to play first before trying all of these hybrids and stringing techniques.
If you are below a 5.5 player, most likely you won't notice such subtle differences anyhow, so just go hit the ball.

Sheer nonsense. The ability to play 5.5 has a lot to do with factors other than feeling the ball, and "feel" is something some pros lack (but most have it) and there is no reason why a 2.5 couldn't tell the difference between hitting, say, with poly/gut vs. nylon. Interest in stringing is entirely independent of ability.

Why did you make this comment?

-Robert