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View Full Version : Choosing a racquet by how i play,or how i WANT to play?


Thor
11-19-2006, 11:22 AM
a simple question that came up today.
should i pick a new racquet that suits my current style,or suits the style that i want to reachh.and i dont mean:"I want to play like fed so ill get the
tour 90",but - i play too much baseline and too much spin,so i want a racquet that wouldnt compliment spinny shots and thus make me go flatter.

chiru
11-19-2006, 11:29 AM
i wanted a racket that would grow to me regardless of how good i got, i.e. i didnt want the racket to be the "limiting reagent" in terms of control, so i got 2 tour 90s and an 85. i kinda wish i had gotten 2 85's and a tour 90 instead.

Noveson
11-19-2006, 02:10 PM
If you have a realistic goal of getting to a certain point in the near future. Then why not get a racquet to fit how you would like to play. If it is only a fantasy and you aren't doing anything to reach it, well then get a racquet for the game you have now.

sureshs
11-19-2006, 02:34 PM
Pick a racquet that you can play with now. That means you can compete effectively with players at your level, and a little above and below you. It also means you can play with it for a couple of hours when you are not feeling so good, say after work/school on a Monday. This strategy will help you experiment with your swing and arrive at a compromise based on your skills. Even advanced players resort to backup modes of play when they just get the ball back. Your play should be intelligent - that is, the racquet should allow you to be a little sloppy once in a while, or hit an unconventional stroke to win a point. A racquet that does not cut you some slack will make you frustrated.

The racquets at your level can be selected based on TW reviews, manufacturer recommendations, or opinions of posters, plus any concerns you may have of tennis elbow.

Then, when you are convinced you are all you can be at the current level, you can get a more demanding racquet (or add lead to your current one, etc) as you prepare to break into the next level.

Amone
11-19-2006, 02:36 PM
Pick a racquet that you can play with now. That means you can compete effectively with players at your level, and a little above and below you. It also means you can play with it for a couple of hours when you are not feeling so good, say after work/school on a Monday. This strategy will help you experiment with your swing and arrive at a compromise based on your skills. Even advanced players resort to backup modes of play when they just get the ball back. Your play should be intelligent - that is, the racquet should allow you to be a little sloppy once in a while, or hit an unconventional stroke to win a point. A racquet that does not cut you some slack will make you frustrated.

The racquets at your level can be selected based on TW reviews, manufacturer recommendations, or opinions of posters, plus any concerns you may have of tennis elbow.

Then, when you are convinced you are all you can be at the current level, you can get a more demanding racquet (or add lead to your current one, etc) as you prepare to break into the next level.

I think you mistook his question, though your advice is well based. What he's saying is, "If I want to serve and volley, should I get a racquet that will encourage net play??"

Noveson
11-19-2006, 04:42 PM
Pick a racquet that you can play with now. That means you can compete effectively with players at your level, and a little above and below you. It also means you can play with it for a couple of hours when you are not feeling so good, say after work/school on a Monday. This strategy will help you experiment with your swing and arrive at a compromise based on your skills. Even advanced players resort to backup modes of play when they just get the ball back. Your play should be intelligent - that is, the racquet should allow you to be a little sloppy once in a while, or hit an unconventional stroke to win a point. A racquet that does not cut you some slack will make you frustrated.

The racquets at your level can be selected based on TW reviews, manufacturer recommendations, or opinions of posters, plus any concerns you may have of tennis elbow.

Then, when you are convinced you are all you can be at the current level, you can get a more demanding racquet (or add lead to your current one, etc) as you prepare to break into the next level.

Just like the last poster I'm thinking he's not wanting a racquet of a different level. Just a racquet for a different style. Also you need to make a decision on whether or not you want to win now. Because if you get a new racquet you might sacrifice some matches, while getting used to it/changing your style.

fearless1
11-19-2006, 06:30 PM
a simple question that came up today.
should i pick a new racquet that suits my current style,or suits the style that i want to reachh.and i dont mean:"I want to play like fed so ill get the
tour 90",but - i play too much baseline and too much spin,so i want a racquet that wouldnt compliment spinny shots and thus make me go flatter.

No...because your question is mostly invalid to begin with. It presumes that you have to change racquets to change STYLE of play. Instead, just change your style of play using the racquet you are using now. Now, if you find your shots going long more than before, that's because flatter shots tend to propel off the stringbed with more velocity (along with obvious less amount of topspin too). Only when your attempts to hit flatter but with less power using current racquet proove too difficult should you start looking at other racquets. The recommended racquet solution then would be to switch to a lesser powerful racquet...such as nCode six 1. :D

bluescreen
11-19-2006, 06:35 PM
i agree w/ fearless1. u can hit flat w/ any racquet. i racquet this isnt very pro spin, like a racquet w/ a closed pattern, isnt gonna make your shots flat, so changing racquets for that is pretty stupid. almost any racquet, w/in reason, is suitable for any kind of play, so i would not buy a racquet w/ only a certain kind of play in mind.

bcsax123
11-19-2006, 06:58 PM
i agree w/ fearless1. u can hit flat w/ any racquet. i racquet this isnt very pro spin, like a racquet w/ a closed pattern, isnt gonna make your shots flat, so changing racquets for that is pretty stupid. almost any racquet, w/in reason, is suitable for any kind of play, so i would not buy a racquet w/ only a certain kind of play in mind.

A racquet with a closed pattern doesnt make your shots flat. It's all technique. You probably hold with a western grip which is why you have so much spin. I know I can hit more topspin with a very dense pattern like a prestige mid than most people at my school because I have correct technique. I think you need to get a wood racket and play with that for a month. Your technique will change completely.

Amone
11-19-2006, 07:18 PM
The thing is, bcsax, that there ARE limitations. I guarantee you'd be able to hit more spin with a V-Engine 10 MP, or even an 18*20 nPS than you can with that prestige mid. There may not be limitations in total, but there are limitations in a particular racquet's spin potential, using a certain method. I hit with just such a VEngine the other day, and got amazing topspin out of it, by comparison to my DNX. The only major difference is the string pattern.

Robbie_1988
11-19-2006, 07:22 PM
I'm pretty satisfied with the way I hit my strokes now and would not be willing to change it. Thus, I prefer buying rackets that will complement my style of play and my types of swings/strokes.

anirut
11-20-2006, 07:00 AM
IMO, this has a lot to do with your level of play.

If you're more or less an accomplished player, already been playing a certain style, having good techniques and happy with your game and already know what, where, why and how to improve, then I think you may look for a stick that'll compliment your existing style of play.

On the other hand (left or right I won't know), if you're at the "search" stage, or not been playing long enough and still trying out or learning some tricks, then you could try looking for a stick that could compliment your wanna be game.

I think it depends on "where" you want to be.