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Bottle Rocket
11-23-2006, 09:10 AM
I am looking to get a stringing machine...

I know I can get buy with the stringers between $100-$200, but should I?

How many of you guys have bought the cheaper ones (Klippermate, String Pal) and regret it?

Is it worth it to spend more? Does it save time?

How do you determine how much to spend?

I will mostly be stringing for myself.

theace21
11-23-2006, 01:02 PM
If you are really into tennis, and you purchase one of these simple drop weight stringers - you probably will upgrade. I think it is best to purchase the best machine you can afford. I bought a simple drop weight, and within a year was looking for a new machine. Nothing wrong with drop weights and they do a fine job, but nothing beats a stand alone machine for easy of stringing.

Problem is the next step up is in the $500 range, and before you know it is easy to jump to over $1000...It just keep going up...Decide electric $1600...

I would not recommend a simple drop weight, unless that is all you can afford...Not an easy decision - Good Luck

Mike Cottrill
11-23-2006, 01:43 PM
I have a Klippermate and used it for five years and it does a great job. The only reason I upgraded is I started a small stringing busness.
Mike

Bottle Rocket
11-23-2006, 02:26 PM
I can afford any of them. This is about making a wise decision.

I guess if I go with a cheaper one and decide to sell it, I won't take much of a loss... Especially compared with the cost of the upgrade. Is it possible to take a big loss here? It seems like almost everyone ends up upgrading because they get a "business", even when they didn't plan on it. I can see that happening with myself, but $600 up front is a lot of money, money I might not be able to get back as easily as with the cheaper stringers.

I have done some research and it seems like either the Gamma X-2 or Klippermate are good to start with. Silent Partner definitely has some interesting stringers and interesting deals. Their website is very helpful. They have an electric stringer for about $240 that caught my eye. I couldn't find a store selling the Alpha String Pal? I think it is the cheapest of all.

Both the Klippermate and X-2 come with a bunch of strings and even an overgrip to try. It seems like every stringer out there comes with an awl and pliers. Most come with a cutting razor as well.

I can get the Gamma X-2 for $139 shipped. The Killermate is $155 shipped.

Any reason NOT to put an order in for the X-2?

josephhkim
11-23-2006, 03:34 PM
Well, if you will be only stringing rackets for yourself, a dropweight should be fine, although it may get tedious.

The rule of thumb TENDS to be get the most expensive you afford.

I would stay away from the really cheap electric Silent Partner. The tension pulling varies depending on the electric current and they are not constant pull.

I'd recommend a cheap dropweight or if not, like a 500-600 dollar crank machine.

If you want an electric, expect to spend at least 1000 dollars.

The gamma is an excellent machine.

topknocker
11-23-2006, 04:25 PM
[QUOTE=Bottle Rocket] I can afford any of them.
if you can, than try to get a decent crank. think about spending at least 20 dollars for a racket restring. (and if you have to take it somewhere to get it done, that alone will cost you time and money). if your a hard hitter and break string alot it doesn't take but just a little while to pay for the stringer. at 500 dollars it only take 25 string jobs to pay for it. if you string for a few friends it's even faster and you make some money to boot. my son is a hard hitter and i brought a 800 dollar stringer for him. it's done paid for itself in a year. he started stringing rackets for other people he didn't expect. he strung over a dozen rackets for the girls tennis team alone this past fall. people justed started calling and bringing rackets to him, word gets around fast if somebody has a stringer. it's really worth your effort to get a good crank, you'll be alot more satisfied. now that would be a wise decision.

topknocker
11-23-2006, 04:43 PM
i was like bottle rocket about a year ago. i brought a cheap electric stringer and thought it was the greatest. well ace21 had something to say about those cheap electric stringers and it kind of upset me some and since i already brought it i said something back to him. didn't take long at all before i found out that ace21 was right. i had to eat crow. i sent it back and got a 800 dollar crank stringer and never looked back. take some advice from some of the more experienced guys on this forum. ;)

nalbandian_fan
11-23-2006, 04:44 PM
i've had a klippermate for about 6 months now, and i do not regret it at all. It was worth the savings and although it takes a little longer to string than with a crank, it is definitely worth the money i saved.

Bottle Rocket
11-23-2006, 05:45 PM
I would stay away from the really cheap electric Silent Partner. The tension pulling varies depending on the electric current and they are not constant pull.



First off, thanks everyone for the replies. I appreciate it.

Josephhkim,

That electric one from Silent Partner really caught my eye. Especially after watching the video of the company's owner stringing a racket in 18 minutes, I got real interested. It looks like that machine is really easy to use and it won't hold you back speed-wise.

I was wondering about its accuracy, which you mention. The dial looks pretty low-tec and innacurate. Is this thing powered by battery or a wall outlet? Nothing in place to regulate power? Where does all the inconsistancy come from? I found a post about someone's being off 15 lbs.

Too good to be true or a good deal? Anybody have any experience with this stringer?

Unless something more comes to light about the $250 electric one from Silent Partner, I'll most likely order the Gamma X-2.

Does the drop-weight method really slow you down as much as people say? What about accuracy and precision of string jobs?

Redflea
11-23-2006, 06:13 PM
I was in a similar position recently...money wasn't an issue, but I wanted to make a "reasonable" investment given my stringing plans. I set a middle-ground budget and started researching. Check out my thread on that here...lots of information from smart folks here that helped me.

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=103861

And I heard a lot of stay away from cheap electrics comments...you'll hear that from anyone w/experience w/these things. I decided better to trust those w/more experience. :)

I ended up in the middle ground...wanted a bit more than the sub-$200 range provided, and didn't feel what I was planning justified springing for a crank or passing the $400 mark. I got the Alpha Pioneer DC Plus ($399)...a drop-weight with some nice "upgraded" features....

- 6 pt mounting
- linear string gripper
- fixed clamps
- heavy-duty turntable

It has the same HW overall as their $550 crank machine (Revo 4K) at the much more digestable $399 price.

Pics/info here: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=104946

I've found stringing with a drop-weight very easy, BTW. Some initial moments of fear/confusion, but quickly moved on to zen stringing status. :)

Good luck, hope you enjoy both the shopping/research and the actual stringing.

theace21
11-23-2006, 09:01 PM
Bottlerocket - you might want look used. Dowjones just bought used Ektelon Model H for $200.

I started out with a drop weight, and quickly tired of the table top drop weight. Wanted something faster, easier to use - and I bought I used Ektelon.

If you are really into tennis, and plan on keep playing - it is a great investment. Many us go thru stages where we play lot, take time off because of the little rug rats - and get back into the game later. Now all my 3 sons play, and the stringer I bought some 10 plus years ago is still going strong. The machine has saved many thousands in stringing costs, and I have had to opportunity to make some cash on the side.

While $600 is a nice chunk of change, the money you save will easily pay for the machine rather quickly. Stringing one racket a week, you will easily have saved/made over $500 (using $10 profit per racket).

How often do you break strings? Twice a month? That is still a minimum $240 profit per year.

I would borrow or save up some of the Christmas money and buy a solid crank machine - check out the table top: Alpha Revo (550), Stand Alone: SP Jazz (599) or SP Maestro (799), you can also go the Gamma or Alpha route, but they are a little more...

You get what you pay for, and better to spend a little more upfront and get something that you will be happy with and last a lifetime...

Now if you are only going to string 3-4 times a year, get a simple drop weight-SP Swing, Klippermate, etc..

Good Luck...

Redflea
11-23-2006, 10:49 PM
YMMV, (or more accurately, all our mileages will vary), but now that I have a drop weight, and have used both it and crank at our club, I am not feeling any "crank envy." :)

There are comments about how "tedious" dropweights are, how you'll surely want to move on to a crank, but from my experience so far that seems overstated...aside from folks doing heavier volumes of racquets, which doesn't appear to fit in this case.

I will mostly be stringing for myself.

That seems to be the salient point....and it's very easy to "over buy" in these situations. Everything looks so cool and tempting!

Bottle Rocket
11-24-2006, 12:48 AM
I really appreciate the replies, especailly from the last two poseters.

You guys all make good points...

It seems there are conflicting opinions on a crank vs drop weight. Some say one is slow and annoying after a while, others say that's not so and they are more accurate.

The is a trend that I see. Nobody has regret spending too much on a stringing machine.

How is the resale value for the more expensive machines? Any good places (with reliable honest people) to look for used ones other than this site?

I would probably be restringing about twice a month for myself and maybe a few more for friends (I might make some friends with this thing). I just don't know. I don't know what will happen once I have the machine. It seems that most people end up doing more than they initially planned on. Making some money and stringing on the side doesn't sound too bad, possibly the next best thing to playing tennis.

Anyobdy else have an argument AGAINST the $250 electric model from Silent Partner? Any Gamma X-2 users that have anything to add?

I will do some more research tomorrow on the higher end crank machines and see what I find.

Lot's of good information in this thread, thanks!

PBODY99
11-24-2006, 05:04 AM
The trouble with the $250 electric machine is that for the increase price over a drop weight, you have to provide an electric motor capable of pulling tensions in a range of 20 to 70 pounds consistently..for $50.00 extra. Solid state things are cheap and reliable, motors aren't.

max
11-24-2006, 05:16 AM
Mike Cottrill's right and some of the above posters also make good sense. I bought my Klippermate, I'm loving it, it's great, and fits the bill: I just string my own frame and once in a while, somebody else's. If you're looking to do more than a couple frames a month, go ahead, save up a bit more and get a crank, fixed clamp model. I think the practical distinction is between personal stringing and being in a situation/business where you're stringing for others frequently.

Bottle Rocket
11-24-2006, 10:30 AM
What exactly is the time difference we're talking about here between the a drop-weight, crank, and the electric one?

josephhkim
11-24-2006, 10:36 AM
Well, i currently own a Silent Partner DG.

If i were you, i'd recommend buying at least a DG, if you wanna get an electric, because it is constant pull and the tension is monitored by a CPU, so it'll be much more accurate.

The bad thing about electric powered, especially the cheap ones, is that they will break down much easier, and when they do break down, it is much harder to fix.

For someone who will be stringing only a couple times a month (it'll probably increase as friends realize you have a machine), i'd recommend a dropweight or if you can afford, go with a crank.

If you do get the cheap silent partner electric, i just wanna say that even though it fluctuates in power, the tension almost always will average out to the correct reference tension. (however, it is not constant pull, so you'll get that same lockout tensioning as a crank).

Also, no matter what machine you get, make sure it has a solid mounting system and always fixed clamps. (if you can afford it).

And by the way, the SP machines are run by a wall outlet.

Good luck!

barry
11-24-2006, 11:46 AM
What exactly is the time difference we're talking about here between the a drop-weight, crank, and the electric one?

Drop weight machine with clutch works like this:
http://eagnas.com/maxgen/griprach.html

Crank Machine's work like this:
http://eagnas.com/maxgen/mcstens.html

Electric machines work like these: Linear grippers are considered better than rotational otherwise the Star would be rotational.
Good
http://www.eagnas.com/maxgen1/c38sgrip.html
Better
http://eagnas.com/maxgen1/sm6sg.html
Best
http://www.eagnas.com/maxgen1/p8sgrip.html

Cutting the old string out, mounting the frame, and stringing a 16 x 19 frame takes me:
30 minutes on a drop weight with a clutch
28 minutes on a crank (I am considered slow)
35 minutes using a Wise electronic system (speed setting set to 2)

I now own a crank machine, and it is the easiest and best of all worlds. Also if you go crank, buy one on a stand, tables slow you down, and you have to work around them. The electric machines are the simplest to use, but if you go Wise, you lose 360 degree rotation.

Best crank machine I have used so far is the Gamma 6004 with the new 2 point mounting system. I can string a racket in about 24 minutes, but hard to justify at $1200.

Hope this helps!

BigGriff
11-24-2006, 12:59 PM
I bought a Gamma X-2 for $135 (free shipping) about 2 months ago. Gamma provided me with over $100 of quality strings, a USRSA "Getting Started Manual," and all the hand tools needed to successfully string a racquet.

Although I usually string for myself, I string about two racquets a week for friends or people I meet during recreational pick-up games. In this short amount of time the stringer cost has already been covered.

The main thing to consider when buying a stringer is the volume of racquets you will string versus the time you will save with a more expensive model. It takes me about 45 min to complete a string job. My times may drop with more experience but that is close enough to the average benchmark of 30 min at a pro shop.

I am happy with my purchase and would only consider a more expensive model if I were to drastically increase my volume of racquets.

thevillageidiot
11-24-2006, 03:11 PM
i have had a gamma x-2 stringer for about a year now. the only complaint i have is that the floating clamps could have been made better. it is a little clumsy clamping the last cross or two, but all in all it was a great investment.

BigGriff
11-24-2006, 03:22 PM
Village, I agree with you on the clamps. I have the all metal floating clamps from Eagnas on order because the Gamma composite clamps are a bit too bulky for my tastes.

LttlElvis
11-24-2006, 04:48 PM
Best crank machine I have used so far is the Gamma 6004 with the new 2 point mounting system. I can string a racket in about 24 minutes, but hard to justify at $1200.

Hope this helps!

Barry, I was looking into the Gamma 6004. What made it the best crank machine you have used ? Was it the mounting system or the crank mechanism, or both ?

Redflea
11-24-2006, 07:04 PM
If you get a tabletop, review the options discussed in this thread....

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=104833

Lots of great ideas for table-top machines.

varuscelli
11-24-2006, 08:46 PM
Drop weight machine with clutch works like this:
http://eagnas.com/maxgen/griprach.html

Crank Machine's work like this:
http://eagnas.com/maxgen/mcstens.html

Electric machines work like these: Linear grippers are considered better than rotational otherwise the Star would be rotational.
Good
http://www.eagnas.com/maxgen1/c38sgrip.html
Better
http://eagnas.com/maxgen1/sm6sg.html
Best
http://www.eagnas.com/maxgen1/p8sgrip.html

Cutting the old string out, mounting the frame, and stringing a 16 x 19 frame takes me:
30 minutes on a drop weight with a clutch
28 minutes on a crank (I am considered slow)
35 minutes using a Wise electronic system (speed setting set to 2)

I now own a crank machine, and it is the easiest and best of all worlds. Also if you go crank, buy one on a stand, tables slow you down, and you have to work around them. The electric machines are the simplest to use, but if you go Wise, you lose 360 degree rotation.

Best crank machine I have used so far is the Gamma 6004 with the new 2 point mounting system. I can string a racket in about 24 minutes, but hard to justify at $1200.

Hope this helps!

Nice post, Barry.

I sure hope you'll be willing to contribute a bit of info, photos, or critique for the stringing machine library (www.photostringer.com (http://www.photostringer.com)).

I've been rolling it around for a bit in my mind about setting up a links page there that links to various "lessons" on other site like the Eagnas ones you showed and the ones on the Silent Partner site, etc.

It's interesting that as much flack as Eagnas sometimes gets, they've got one of the better assembled sites out there, information-wise. Lots of good photos (right down to the component level), good text, some lesson materials (as you showed), etc. I have to give them kudos for the thoroughness of the info available there.

Again, nice post.

Al

thevillageidiot
11-24-2006, 10:07 PM
Village, I agree with you on the clamps. I have the all metal floating clamps from Eagnas on order because the Gamma composite clamps are a bit too bulky for my tastes.

how much are the metal floating clamps from eagnas?

dancraig
11-24-2006, 10:29 PM
how much are the metal floating clamps from eagnas?

http://www.eagnas.com/tools.html

barry
11-25-2006, 01:40 AM
Barry, I was looking into the Gamma 6004. What made it the best crank machine you have used ? Was it the mounting system or the crank mechanism, or both ?

I like the mounting system. I currently own a 6 point mounting system, with 3 adjustable knobs on each side. So you have 6 adjustment points to fiddle around with when you mount a frame. The two point mounting system has 2 adjustment knobs to play with. Much faster and easier to use and seems to provide adequate support.

Often, on my 6 point suspension mounting system string holes are obstructed. The 2 point system eliminates the obstructions and is simpler, faster, and easier to use. If you string a lot of frames, it is a big plus. The instruction manual is at http://206.210.94.83/assets/manuals/pdf/MG632-1.pdf but looked a little different than the one I played with.

Most of my customer’s string in the mid 50’s these days, probably due to racket stiffness. I seldom have anyone asking for anything about 62 pounds. So it is questionable if 6 points is even applicable anymore or a left over from a previous era.

I also like the look and feel of the machine, it is pretty smooth to use. Clamps, I still prefer the 3 point model, easier to position when stringing the denser 18 x 20 patterns. The crank is pretty much the same old crank you see on all machines. I am not sold on the Diablo, takes extra time to wrap the string, but since the tensioner sets lower, I think it is necessary.

I could not find any manufacturers name on the 6004, and not sure who builds the machines for Gamma, but if you have a lot of rackets to string, couple of minutes saving here and there is a plus.

Hopefully the new 2 point system will become the standard, who knows; maybe someday we will get a self weaving feature.

barry
11-25-2006, 03:03 AM
Nice post, Barry.

I sure hope you'll be willing to contribute a bit of info, photos, or critique for the stringing machine library (www.photostringer.com (http://www.photostringer.com)).

I've been rolling it around for a bit in my mind about setting up a links page there that links to various "lessons" on other site like the Eagnas ones you showed and the ones on the Silent Partner site, etc.

It's interesting that as much flack as Eagnas sometimes gets, they've got one of the better assembled sites out there, information-wise. Lots of good photos (right down to the component level), good text, some lesson materials (as you showed), etc. I have to give them kudos for the thoroughness of the info available there.

Again, nice post.

Al

I try and stay away from discussions about flack on any string machine producer (everyone has an opinion), but recently look more at the technology and what productivity gains you get when you purchased a product. For me whose name is on a machine is really a non issue. Most companies simply buy parts from sub contractors and assemble and put their logo on them. Many have high overhead and spend a ton on money on marketing. It all comes out in the price you pay for a product.

When I get some free time will send up some photos of my Eagnas machine. I have owned 2 Eagnas machine in last 10 years, and have strung over 2000 frames with no issues or problems, so for me changing vendors will only happen if I can gain some benefit or parts are no longer available. Both machines produce a consistent repeatable string job which is all you can ask.

Bottle Rocket
11-25-2006, 08:07 AM
After all the input from you guys and my own research here, stringforum.net, and other websites I made a decision.

Considering I am new at this and have the freedom to upgrade to a pricey machine ($600+) if I really end up needing it or wanting it, I bought a new Gamma X-2. I have a feeling it will meet my needs for a long time to come.

All the reviews I've seen say it is as good or better than the Klippermate and one of the better low end machines. A simple drop weight mechanism is evidently accurate as well as precise, something I am most interested in. My heart really wanted the e.stringer from Silent Partner. The costs would have really added up on that thing and the issues of accuracy and reliability worried me.

The biggest factor is price. You can get an X-2 for $131 shipped. That is an offer I can't refuse.

I wish Tennis Warehouse sold stringers (not the $1500 stringers).

I will learn how to string on this as well as continue my research so if and when I do decide to upgrade I can make an educated decision.

I will let you guys know how the stringing goes and provide a little review of the machine from the standpoint of a newbie once it arrives.

I appreciate all the help!

varuscelli
11-25-2006, 09:18 AM
Barry, I was looking into the Gamma 6004. What made it the best crank machine you have used ? Was it the mounting system or the crank mechanism, or both ?

I like the mounting system. I currently own a 6 point mounting system, with 3 adjustable knobs on each side. So you have 6 adjustment points to fiddle around with when you mount a frame. The two point mounting system has 2 adjustment knobs to play with. Much faster and easier to use and seems to provide adequate support.


Small point, but on the new Gamma 6004 with the 6-point, self-centering mounting system, there are not as many adjustment knobs that have to be used (only three as opposed to six).

There are two knobs for the shoulder support arms (one on each end) and two knobs for the frame support post adjustment (only one of which needs to be used, since they both make the same adjustment, but you have your choice of whichever one is within most convenient reach).

So -- if I'm interpreting how this fits in to the above comments -- the newer Gamma with the 6-point mounting system has only three total knobs to adjust rather than six (two shoulder support knobs and one frame support post knob).

Gamma Tech did a a nice post comparing the two (overview, pros and cons) a while back:

New GAMMA 6-PT & 2-PT Self-Centering Mounting System FAQ’s (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=87903)

varuscelli
11-25-2006, 09:23 AM
When I get some free time will send up some photos of my Eagnas machine. I have owned 2 Eagnas machine in last 10 years, and have strung over 2000 frames with no issues or problems, so for me changing vendors will only happen if I can gain some benefit or parts are no longer available. Both machines produce a consistent repeatable string job which is all you can ask.

That's great! I'll look forward to getting some photos from you at your convenience. I' sure those will make nice addition to the "user submitted" images.

So far in the Eagnas section, I have photos from LttlElvis of his Eagnas Hawk with Wise tension head:

http://www.photostringer.com/eagnas.htm

BigGriff
11-25-2006, 12:55 PM
Bottle, study the Gamma USRSA "Getting Started Manual" before you start stringing. It will be delivered with your free string package from Gamma. It will definately help you to get started. If you have any specific questions about the Gamma X-2 feel free to ask. Good Luck

barry
11-25-2006, 03:39 PM
Small point, but on the new Gamma 6004 with the 6-point, self-centering mounting system, there are not as many adjustment knobs that have to be used (only three as opposed to six).

There are two knobs for the shoulder support arms (one on each end) and two knobs for the frame support post adjustment (only one of which needs to be used, since they both make the same adjustment, but you have your choice of whichever one is within most convenient reach).

So -- if I'm interpreting how this fits in to the above comments -- the newer Gamma with the 6-point mounting system has only three total knobs to adjust rather than six (two shoulder support knobs and one frame support post knob).

Gamma Tech did a a nice post comparing the two (overview, pros and cons) a while back:

New GAMMA 6-PT & 2-PT Self-Centering Mounting System FAQ’s (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=87903)

From the Gamma link and I quote:

"The 6 Point does give more support to the racquet while it is being strung. The drawbacks are: it takes more time to string because there is more to parts to work around with the arms and there are more opportunities for the string to get caught."

If you string 50 to 60rackets a week, 5 minutes a racket is a pretty good productivity gain. A good stringer can crank out 3 rackets an hour, instead of 2.2 with the 6 point system.

The 6 point mounting has been around for years. The new mounting system 2 point was released this year. Give it a try, for me it was better.

Redflea
11-25-2006, 06:11 PM
I don't know how the 6 pt mounting systems work on other machines, but I have yet to find the 6 pt mounting on my Alpha to get in the way, or take more than a few seconds to put the racquet in place...all this talk about 6 pt being a hinder seems wierd to me. Caveat: I'm new to stringing and have only used my own stringer, and an older 2 pt at our club.

mshinde
11-25-2006, 09:04 PM
I bought a Gamma X-2 for $135 (free shipping) about 2 months ago. Gamma provided me with over $100 of quality strings, a USRSA "Getting Started Manual," and all the hand tools needed to successfully string a racquet.

Although I usually string for myself, I string about two racquets a week for friends or people I meet during recreational pick-up games. In this short amount of time the stringer cost has already been covered.

The main thing to consider when buying a stringer is the volume of racquets you will string versus the time you will save with a more expensive model. It takes me about 45 min to complete a string job. My times may drop with more experience but that is close enough to the average benchmark of 30 min at a pro shop.

I am happy with my purchase and would only consider a more expensive model if I were to drastically increase my volume of racquets.

Hey BigGriff..

Where did you buy Gamma X-2. I am pretty confused, one store mentions 3 free strings with manual and one store mentions 100$ strings but no manual.

I will prefer to have manual. Strings will always be abonus..

BigGriff
11-26-2006, 04:49 PM
Try Mid West sports dot com . Free shipping, $100 bundle of Gamma products, and stringing manual. If they no longer provide free shipping a few other places do. Just Google Gamma X-2 Stringing Machine.

Steve Huff
11-26-2006, 08:16 PM
I started with a dropweight, have had a couple of cranks, and now use an electric (Wise Tension head). Here's my opinion:
a) If you're stringing only for yourself, a dropweight may be adequate. I say adequate because they do get the job done. But, I haven't seen ANY good floating clamps out there now. Even the good ones have a lot of drawback that must ultimately be made up for on the tie-off string. <36 rackets/year, I'd say go for a dropweight.

b) If you're going to string for others, I'd want fixed clamps and a very sturdy mounting system (actually, I'd want that for my own personal machine too). I'd say these 2 things are a MINIMUM. Swivel clamps are more versatile, but glide bar clamps are simpler and more durable. If I was stringing >36 and <500 rackets/year, I'd go with a crank, fixed clamps. Machines like the Alpha Revo, Apex or Prince Neos come to mind (even a used Ektelon H if it's in good condition--but parts are getting harder to get each year).

c) If you're stringing >500 rackets/year, you're probably taking it pretty seriously. Top end cranks will do fine, but you'll no doubt read about "constant pull" being the standard, and want to upgrade eventually. Plus, it is faster, even if someone (I can't remember who said it) can string faster on a crank. If you can string faster on a crank, you're either cranking so fast that the string hasn't had time to relax yet, you're not used to the electric machine, or it's some other factor than the tensioner itself, such as clamps or you're just really familiar with the crank machine. Plus, by the time you start stringing >500 rackets/year, you're probably already looking as to how to step up next. I went with a Wise Tension head so that I'd have a crank backup, just in case something went wrong and I had some rackets that had to be strung. If you have a backup stringer, you might want to go with a straight electric machine.

These are just my guidelines however. Others will have different opinions.

TENNIS_IS_FUN
11-26-2006, 08:48 PM
Exactly what comes in the 100$ package when you order the Gamma x-2?

BigGriff
11-26-2006, 11:33 PM
Exactly what comes in the 100$ package when you order the Gamma x-2?

Gamma Live Wire XP, TNT2, Duraspin, Professional, Revelation, ZO Plus, Overgrips, Vibration Dampener, Syn Gut, Challenger, etc...

The package is subject to change since Gamma tries to send strings that are popular or new. They also provide a free copy of RSI Magazine.

WhiteSox05CA
11-28-2006, 01:39 PM
What's the best mounting system(2,4,6 pt...)? And what's the best tension mechanism (dropweight, crank, etc.)?

I'm a first time stringer and would mainly be stringing for myself and maybe a few other people.
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BigGriff
11-28-2006, 04:49 PM
What's the best mounting system(2,4,6 pt...)? And what's the best tension mechanism (dropweight, crank, etc.)?

I'm a first time stringer and would mainly be stringing for myself and maybe a few other people.

This link and website may answer the majority of your questions on the basics of stringing.

http://www.stringforum.net/about_machines.php