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spectraflamed
12-03-2006, 04:57 PM
.... is it to string? I have read a ton of posts on this and I am still very intimidated. I think I want to go with the low cost Klippermate ($139 I think) but I am still not sure. I read the online manuels for a few companies and it seems like it would be very difficult. I am not very mechanically minded and can change a light bulb but not much beyond that. I think the knots are what is scaring me the most. Anyway can a guy with very little skill actually do this? Also if you think I am nuts buying a Klippermate plmk I did research and seemed sold on it however I of coarse have never used any machine so I respect peoples opinions who use these machines. thanks for any help Also do these cheap machines ever go for sale as used?

DRtenniS1112
12-03-2006, 04:59 PM
It is not very hard. You won't be a pro at the beginning, just like everything, but with every racket you will improve and increase effeciency and time.

xtremerunnerars
12-03-2006, 05:04 PM
I'm getting an x-2 (gamma) for christmas. Just watch video after video until you get it.

My only concerns so far are:
Knowing how to interpret the pattern
Tensioning correctly

DRtenniS1112
12-03-2006, 05:06 PM
I'm getting an x-2 (gamma) for christmas. Just watch video after video until you get it.

My only concerns so far are:
Knowing how to interpret the pattern
Tensioning correctly

My advice to you about the pattern are to never string until you've looked it up. USRSA has a great book that has the pattern of all modern rackets. If you're a member (or a member's friend) like me, you can get one of these. Also patterns can be found online.

Redflea
12-03-2006, 05:09 PM
It is much easier than it sounds, but the first racquet you do will be kinda scary as you learn the steps. Once you've done it you'll have a "Wow, that was pretty simple." moment and never look back. :)

Don't worry, between the help on this site in here and the Strings and Stinging forum, and sites like SP you have no chance to fail.

pmata814
12-03-2006, 06:42 PM
I have fixed clamps and I don't find it hard at all. I had some trouble when I started, but learned quite quickly with help from Mark at Alpha and also from a lot of guys on this board. Sure, I can't compare myself to somebody who does this for a living but that was never my goal. I don't know how much harder it would be with floating clamps though.

LttlElvis
12-03-2006, 07:17 PM
Since you already have a desire to string your racquets, I would say it should come fairly easy to you. After a couple of practices it is pretty enjoyable.

As far as fixed clamps vs. floating clamps, fixed clamps will give a more accurate and consistent string job. As far as difficulty using fixed vs. floating, they are a little different but one is not more difficult than the other.

patrick922
12-03-2006, 07:41 PM
dont be intimidated it isnt that hard.... i was just like you when i started... i was intimidated about stringing but after you read the directions and all that you will find that it is very easy. stringing is more repetative than complicated. you will find that stringing is very tedious but not hard at all. just make sure to read the directions and clamp it down correctly. then depending on your racquet start at the head or the throat. then from there tension then clamp then tension then clamp then tension then clamp, etc, etc, etc...... then tie off.....then when you get to the crosses its up, down, up, down, up, down.... then tie off.

goober
12-03-2006, 08:17 PM
Its not hard. Read the manual carefully and do an old racquet first for practice. You will make mistakes in the beginning, but everyone does. After several times it will become routine, especially if you are just stringing the same model racquet over and over again.

theace21
12-04-2006, 06:00 AM
The first racket might take you two hours and have a couple of weaving errors, but you quickly get into the hour range. It is like any other skill it takes practice. You might want to visit a local proshop and watch how they mount and start the string process.

jonolau
12-04-2006, 07:34 AM
I bought a stringing machine this year with zip experience, zip knowledge of tying knots, zip, zip, zip. Didn't watch any videos, didn't read any manuals. Just studied my racquet carefully, tracing the direction of each string, visited the Keohi site to learn to tie knots, and had help and advice from supportive posters here in TTW!

But to be fair, I had lots of apprehension and doubt when I first bought my machine and it sat on the floor for 2 weeks before I decided to just take the plunge and cut out the strings from my racquet. I've not looked back since.

My first job took me one hour plus. Now I'm down to 25-40 mins depending on type of string, and have strung about a hundred racquets in 2.5 months.

ironicqueery
12-04-2006, 11:30 AM
I've strung two rackets so far with my gamma x-2, and it's definitely not as hard as it might seem.

I do find that finding and interpreting a string pattern is the hardest part of stringing. Once you actually get going on the racket, it's smooth sailing.

As for tension, I like my racket tight, and was worried with my floating clamps, that i might lose a lot of tension. but no such thing has happened. I'm getting my strings tighter than ********* did. The Gamma x-2 seems pretty good at being accurate.

boxingguy
12-04-2006, 01:43 PM
If you can tie your shoes you can string. I was happy with my Klipper, but the clamps gave out after a while. The Gamma X-2 has better clamps. Go for it.

aussie
12-05-2006, 06:56 PM
If you can tie your shoes you can string. I was happy with my Klipper, but the clamps gave out after a while. The Gamma X-2 has better clamps. Go for it.

A lot of users say the Klipper clamps are better than the Gamma ones. I've never used the Gamma ones, but the Klipper ones work very well. If they do wear out, klipper gives a lifetime guarantee on ALL parts and will replace them free of charge.

The Klipper stringing manual is very good and explains all aspects of stringing very clearly. To get yourself prepared, watch the Silent Partner stringing video and download the manual for the SP Swing for instructions on knot tying etc. You'll wonder why you didn't do it years ago!!

spectraflamed
12-05-2006, 07:49 PM
OK I am sold and I will be getting a machine after the holidays (once I have the cash) and will be going with the Klip. Get ready for some dumb questions however I am sure I will have plenty lol

boxingguy
12-05-2006, 09:01 PM
A lot of users say the Klipper clamps are better than the Gamma ones. I've never used the Gamma ones, but the Klipper ones work very well. If they do wear out, klipper gives a lifetime guarantee on ALL parts and will replace them free of charge.

Ahhh, you are correct. I didn't realize the Gamma clamps weren't all metal. They look like the all metal clamps I got from Eagnas which I liked better than my Klipper clamps.

Spectra, you'll be very happy with your Klipper. I used mine for years and it worked great (except for the clamps giving out).

eunjam
12-06-2006, 11:48 AM
if you don't have a thumb, it might be kind of challenging.

rod_b
12-06-2006, 12:12 PM
if you don't have a thumb, it might be kind of challenging.

LMAO! That was funny. Well, all kidding aside I just got my stringer several months ago. It's not that hard at all. Just take your time and study the racket's string pattern before you start. Other than that, how hard is it really to pull tension on a string...even without a thumb!? :p