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View Full Version : Serrano "No Awl" Stringing Machine?


varuscelli
12-05-2006, 01:48 PM
I'm finding myself being drawn more and more at photos of old stringing machines (hopefully for eventual inclusion somewhere in the photo library) and saw this interesting old machine on the big auction site labeled as a "Serrano no awl Tennis Racquet Stringing Machine, Model UV-550." I tried searching for more info on "Serrano" machines but couldn't find any kind of reference to them.

I actually e-mailed the seller and he said he'd try and take some extra photos of it and send them to me for the photo library once the auction was done.

Anyone ever hear of a "Serrano No Awl Stringing Machine before (or "Serrano" in general as a stringing machine maker)? Spanish, maybe?

I didn't want to link to the photo of it or anything here as realize that's not appropriate, but it's out there to be viewed if anyone wants to do a search (very old looking machine bluish-green in color with a large, cylindrical base).

xtremerunnerars
12-05-2006, 02:17 PM
http://www.stringforum.net/mforum.php?show=serrano&model=Serrano

The one was bought in 1986, and the other in 1996! I'm guessing they're a foreign company that went under?

DRtenniS1112
12-05-2006, 02:25 PM
Whoa that thing looks crazy. Did you see the pic of his strings? He had ginormous reels of ancient string.

varuscelli
12-05-2006, 02:57 PM
http://www.stringforum.net/mforum.php?show=serrano&model=Serrano

The one was bought in 1986, and the other in 1996! I'm guessing they're a foreign company that went under?

Hey, thanks for that link. That helps to answer a few questions about it in that it's interesting to see someone actually comment on it. I wasn't sure I'd be able to see any comments about it other than something like, "Yeah, my grandfather used to use one just like it..." :)

wally
12-05-2006, 04:42 PM
My father in law has one in the basement in working condition. I learned to string on it 8-10yrs ago. What a beast. In its day it was the cadillac of stringers. If you can master the machine you get a great great string job. The old man can play the machine like eddie van halen plays guitar. My guess is he's strung 1000s of racquets in the 40+ years he's owned it The only sticks you can't string on it are 100sq in or larger head size or > 27" long.

We're in the process of getting a Prince Neos 1000 and Wise tension head. He wants ease of use and I want the increased accuracy of a constant pull electronic machine. We figured after 40 years it was time for an upgrade:D

xtremerunnerars
12-05-2006, 04:44 PM
lol @ the grandfather thing.

I found two listings on a website that allows people to sell things. 10s4awl (figure it out) is the site. I don't have a login yet though, so hold for future posting! If you guys have one then feel free to post what those listings are.

*edit* got the login, finally. I have two email addresses of people that are selling a serrano stringer. Perhaps we (varuscelli) can contact them? They are:

junurcia@hotmail.com
blazerson@exchange.ml.com

Who knows, maybe they're cool people?

Steve Huff
12-05-2006, 08:20 PM
I have a Serrano 550B. It's in several pieces at the time, but eventually, it will be back together and more modern.

varuscelli
12-05-2006, 08:49 PM
I have a Serrano 550B. It's in several pieces at the time, but eventually, it will be back together and more modern.

Hey, I hope we can see some of the modernization through photos when the time is right... ;)

Is that one quite a monster in size and weight as the one we've been discussing? (If you've seen it, but I'm assuming it's the same machine.)

And Steve, if you'll excuse my ignorance here, but what does the "no awl" part mean (or is it even meaningful), in that the seller had that as part of the machine's name in the auction? Why did he call it the "Serrano No Awl Stringing Machine?"

Al Ruscelli

dancraig
12-05-2006, 09:18 PM
Hey, I hope we can see some of the modernization through photos when the time is right... ;)

Is that one quite a monster in size and weight as the one we've been discussing? (If you've seen it, but I'm assuming it's the same machine.)

And Steve, if you'll excuse my ignorance here, but what does the "no awl" part mean (or is it even meaningful), in that the seller had that as part of the machine's name in the auction? Why did he call it the "Serrano No Awl Stringing Machine?"

Al Ruscelli

I'm going to take a guess at the answer to your question. In the early days of racquet stringing, clamps weren't used. An awl was inserted into the hole along side the tensioned string to hold tension. I'm thinking the manufactorer was simply drawing attention to the fact that this was not needed with the "new fangled" stringing machine with clamps.


Steve, if later I find that I'm dissatisfied with my post, I'll probably try to delete with a __________.

varuscelli
12-05-2006, 09:33 PM
Steve, if later I find that my answer is way off I will probably try to delete with a __________.

Ha! :)

But I'll buy your answer. Sounds reasonable to me. If you're wrong, I'll strike this reply, too. :p

flash9
12-06-2006, 04:15 AM
Like DanCraig said, no awl was because these machines had fixed clamps, where before awls were used. See the below link of an image scanned from a Popular Science Publishing Company - May 1942.
Tennis Stringing Lever (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=81918)
In this image you can see the awl being used to clamp the string just over his right knee.

Varuscelli - If you want to you are free to add this image to your stringing machine images, I have the original scan if you want. :p

flash9
12-06-2006, 04:47 AM
Ha! :)

But I'll buy your answer. Sounds reasonable to me. If you're wrong, I'll strike this reply, too. :p

Varuscelli - I miss-read your post, I thought you had wrote, "... If you're right, I'll strike this reply."

And I can not edit the Title! - I was joking, but the joke does not make sense unless you understand how I read your post! :sad:

Steve Huff
12-06-2006, 05:27 AM
I agree with Dancraig. Clamps came out to replace awls for holding the string in place.

varuscelli
12-06-2006, 05:39 AM
Like DanCraig said, no awl was because these machines had fixed clamps, where before awls were used.

I agree with Dancraig. Clamps came out to replace awls for holding the string in place.

Makes sense.

And thus the famous expression, "Look, Mom, no awl!"

(Or am I thinking of something else? :p )

varuscelli
12-06-2006, 05:43 AM
Varuscelli - I miss-read your post, I thought you had wrote, "... If you're right, I'll strike this reply."

And I can not edit the Title! - I was joking, but the joke does not make sense unless you understand how I read your post! :sad:

I got ya! But I think you were going easy on me. If memory serves, I surely have more strikes than that by now (even without that one). :confused:

:p

varuscelli
12-06-2006, 05:57 AM
Popular Science Publishing Company - May 1942.
Tennis Stringing Lever (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=81918)
In this image you can see the awl being used to clamp the string just over his right knee.

Varuscelli - If you want to you are free to add this image to your stringing machine images, I have the original scan if you want. :p

Given its age, I doubt anyone would have copyright objections. I could probably post it there without worry, if you'd like to send it. It's certainly an interesting enough piece that it ought to be shared.

If you'd like to e-mail it to me, that would be great. ;)

vruscelli@houston.rr.com

But...if the one you referenced is the full-sized scan, I could just copy it from the post you linked to. Is that one at full size? Certainly looks big enough to use.

varuscelli
12-08-2006, 02:16 PM
For anyone interested, I contacted the owner of the Serrano UV-550 and he sent me a few more photos, all of which are now posted on the Stringing Machine Photo Library site.

Here's the entry page for "miscellaneous stringing machines":

http://www.photostringer.com/misc_stringing_machines.htm

Here's the main page for the Serrano UV-550 photos:

http://www.photostringer.com/serrano_UV550_01.htm

migjam
12-10-2006, 06:23 AM
Yup, thats the machine I actually learned to string on.