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View Full Version : How many restringing job can a modern racquet take?


kaissoz
12-06-2006, 10:39 PM
I understand a racquet goes through a tremendous amount of stress during restringing, and pros would have stock piles of retired racquets that have gone through a number of restringing jobs.

How many string job can a modern graphite racquet take before it "dies"?

thanks.

Bent
12-06-2006, 10:57 PM
Some say about 50, but it is a gradual proces.

But it has to depend og which frame.

Any science ?

kurniadis
12-06-2006, 11:17 PM
Im new to this concept. Say, the rackets is past its peak after many time re stringing. Whats gonna happen to the racket? Is it gonna crack, bend, implode, explode, burst ito flames?

alu16L
12-06-2006, 11:23 PM
Im new to this concept. Say, the rackets is past its peak after many time re stringing. Whats gonna happen to the racket? Is it gonna crack, bend, implode, explode, burst ito flames?

Usually it just spontaneously combusts.:-D

But rally it will just feel too flexible and will be more likely to break during play. Most pros stop using rackets once they lose the desired feel. After that, I guess they are auctioned off with money going to a good cause.

haerdalis
12-07-2006, 12:01 AM
So what about Pete and his St vincents. Surely after ten years and him restringing for every match and practice the frames must have been dead then. Maybe thats why he stopped.

psp2
12-07-2006, 01:00 AM
Perhaps some of you should concentrate on hitting better bh than worrying about your racquets losing its feel from multiple stringing.

My $.02...

kaissoz
12-07-2006, 03:53 AM
thanks for the responses. I guess i'll see how it goes. I'm just getting back more seriously into the game, and just got 5 frames of the same racquet and a stringing machine. I'll be experiencing with strings/tension initially, so some string jobs might only last 10 min before i cut them. after that i'll be rotating 3 frames at a time in an effort to always keep fresh strings on (except for tournaments). i like this frame (now discontinued), so i was just wondering how many useable years i could get out of them.

JRW
12-07-2006, 04:01 AM
If I'm not mistaken, all else being equal, the stiffer racquets will be able to withstand more stringings than the flexible ones. Of course racquet composition has a lot to do with it. Just out of curiosity what racquet are you using kaissoz?

kaissoz
12-07-2006, 05:02 AM
I picked the LM instinct tour xl. I had the 28 inch version of the PT 280 for many years before switching to the the PS tour 95 (which i had lead up quite a bit). I liked the feel of it, though i hardly played these past couple of years, and now that i'm hitting regularly with 5.0's, i found it too demanding, the sweetspot was too small for me...

pmata814
12-07-2006, 05:21 AM
Some say about 50, but it is a gradual proces.

But it has to depend og which frame.

Any science ?

This can't be right. I string about once a week and sometimes twice just to experiment with strings. This would mean that I would have to get a new racquet every year?

Rabbit
12-07-2006, 05:56 AM
Tennis Magazine did a study once on frame degredation. They said that if you're a 3.0 or below, a frame should last you a lifetime. If you're 4.0 or so then you can get roughly 5 years or so out of one. 4.5 and above can go 3 years. Pros get roughly 6 months.

I also was told that some pros like brand new frames while others like their frames broken in. Lendl used to let his friends play with new frames for that reason. Sergi Bruguera liked his frames after about 50 stringings. It's kind of like shoes, some shoes feel best when you put them on and others feel best right before they wear out. I personally like my frames to be a little more flexible than new.

kaissoz
12-07-2006, 06:08 AM
Tennis Magazine did a study once on frame degredation. They said that if you're a 3.0 or below, a frame should last you a lifetime. If you're 4.0 or so then you can get roughly 5 years or so out of one. 4.5 and above can go 3 years. Pros get roughly 6 months.

I also was told that some pros like brand new frames while others like their frames broken in. Lendl used to let his friends play with new frames for that reason. Sergi Bruguera liked his frames after about 50 stringings. It's kind of like shoes, some shoes feel best when you put them on and others feel best right before they wear out. I personally like my frames to be a little more flexible than new.

In that study, did they specify the restringing frequency? Also, when you say a frame can go 3 years for example, does it assume that one is solely using that frame (without rotating it with others) for that period of time?

In any case, thanks for all the responses, it looks more than likely that despite fairly frequent planned restringning, my current set will last me more than 5 years, at which point I shouldn't have problems finding another frame I'll like (i try to avoid reading all these "searching for my holy grail threads :))...

Rabbit
12-07-2006, 12:57 PM
I really don't remember if restringing was mentioned or not. I would have to think that it was considered since in 3-years, one must certainly restring.

I think the real key here is that whatever feels best to you is what works. As I mentioned, some pros like new rackets (I think Agassi is one) and other pros like Bruguera like broken in rackets (50+ restrings). A frame that does "dead" to one pro may be just right to another. I think the same would apply to any player. It's just what you like best.

spectraflamed
12-07-2006, 01:43 PM
How long will they last if you keep blasting returns using the frame? ;) it seems my strings last forever

NoBadMojo
12-07-2006, 01:55 PM
it depends upon the frame, the string used, and a persons ability to even feel frame fatigue. if someone cant feel the differnce, then it really doesnt matter. the way to tell is to play an old frame along side a new identical frame. stringing puts the most stress on a frame, but many of the better quality frames and the newer frames last much longer than the older frames and frames of lesser quality.
a fatigued frame will be more flexy and also feel more dull and lifeless.
example: when i used pc's i got no more than 2 seasons out of them rotating 4-6 frames before they either fatigued or warped <was playing lots of tourneys back then> ps85's also quickly fatigued. fischer vacuum pros lasted a really long time...years
i would be curious if/how much using polys might reduce the life of a frame..poly being so stiff and nasty seems like they would put an incredible amount of stress on a frame

Rafa's best friend
12-07-2006, 02:01 PM
I understand a racquet goes through a tremendous amount of stress during restringing, and pros would have stock piles of retired racquets that have gone through a number of restringing jobs.

How many string job can a modern graphite racquet take before it "dies"?

thanks.

How do you know if the frame is dead ?????????:confused:

kaissoz
12-07-2006, 05:02 PM
Interesting comment about poly, I'll be curious to find out as well since 2 of my frames currently have a full job of cyberflash 17, and for now it is my preferred setup (at least the one giving me the best results in competitive situations while providing with a feel i do not dislike). the discovery of poly for me this year is actually what prompted me to get my own machine, as I plan to restring after 10 to 15 hours.

Also, assuming the frame does not warp or crack, I would guess that the increase in flex is gradulal/linear over time, correct?

True, perhaps the majority (even including myself) might not be bothered by the increasing flex, as pointed out, i might even like it better. As is, I can feel differences in swingweights/static weight between each of my 5 frames, but i guess it's not dramatic enough to let myself be bothered by it (even though i now know there's a 9 gramm difference between my lightest and heaviest frame...).

Vitaly Evchenkov
12-07-2006, 06:20 PM
I think polys are better for frame longevity because of the lower tensions needed to string them. When I string them at 55lbs instead of a multi at 66lbs, the frame does not distort as much.
Might be better for your frame but worse for your arm... dunno.
I just tried using nat. gut hybrid and my arm has definitely enjoyed the plush ride ... like driving grandma's Caddy!:-)

vkartikv
12-07-2006, 06:22 PM
My oldest racquet, a mid 90s prostaff midsize has seen 21 stringjobs so far and still going steady. I am no Pete to tell the difference b/w frames to the 4th decimal..

Steve Huff
12-11-2006, 12:37 PM
Look at Connor's old t2000, which he kept using well after Wilson quit making them. I'd bet some of his rackets had over 200 stringjobs.

Ripper
12-11-2006, 12:42 PM
Again, "the internal fibers breakdown with time" theory is, extremely, exagerated. I'm sure this was spread by the raquet companies themselves. I can't believe people are not suspicious of this.

Dunlopkid
12-11-2006, 03:16 PM
I really don't remember if restringing was mentioned or not. I would have to think that it was considered since in 3-years, one must certainly restring.

I think the real key here is that whatever feels best to you is what works. As I mentioned, some pros like new rackets (I think Agassi is one) and other pros like Bruguera like broken in rackets (50+ restrings). A frame that does "dead" to one pro may be just right to another. I think the same would apply to any player. It's just what you like best.

I heard the opposite--that Agassi likes his frames after about 50 restringings.

Dunlopkid
12-11-2006, 03:20 PM
Gotta agree, Ripper. I too think the racket companies spread this. But then again it gives all us racket junkies on TW an excuse to get a new frame every other week. j/k. LOL.

eunjam
12-11-2006, 03:22 PM
isn't there proof somewhere that the amount of 'deterioration' of internal graphite fibers......is something that a human can't detect anyways?

this is ridiculous.

i think that in the selling/trade section, if someone's selling a racket, they need to disclose how many times the racket has been strung.

.....or i'll set up a website called 'racquetfax.com'. a comprehensive report on used racquets.

this thread is ridiculous.

Rabbit
12-12-2006, 10:03 AM
Again, "the internal fibers breakdown with time" theory is, extremely, exagerated. I'm sure this was spread by the raquet companies themselves. I can't believe people are not suspicious of this.

The graphite fibers are bound together by resin. While degredation may be slow to really slow for weekenders, there is probably some truth to the fact that rackets wear out. I know I can tell the difference in some older frames compared to newer ones. At some point, the racket will breakdown to the point that it breaks.

I heard the opposite--that Agassi likes his frames after about 50 restringings.

Really? I stand corrected.

python
12-12-2006, 10:21 AM
I can empirically attest that racquets do weaken and become more flexible over time. Don't believe me? Get two matched racquets and string one of them 60+ times. Then freshly string them both with the same string and tension and take them out to the courts to compare. I'd be shocked if an avid racquet head like most here could not tell the difference between them.

renhoek
12-12-2006, 10:34 AM
Can someone post a request to MythBusters on settling this topic?

DownTheLineWith90
03-07-2013, 09:59 PM
Can someone post a request to MythBusters on settling this topic?

^ :idea: i like.

TennisCJC
03-08-2013, 05:53 AM
Look at Connor's old t2000, which he kept using well after Wilson quit making them. I'd bet some of his rackets had over 200 stringjobs.

I am not a scientist but I don't think stainless steel would break down like graphite/fiberglass/carbon fibers. Connor's could just clean his t2000 rackets with some steel wool and restring them forever.