PDA

View Full Version : Dropweight Tensioning


WhiteSox05CA
12-09-2006, 06:50 AM
Is dropweight tensioning on a stringing machine accurate? I've heard some people complain that electric stringers are often off by up to 15 lbs. Does a dropweight system distribute even tension throughout the stringbed? I also read that some machines make the tension at seperate strings different, such as the top cross string being very tight, and the middle ones loose.

barry
12-09-2006, 08:49 AM
Is dropweight tensioning on a stringing machine accurate? I've heard some people complain that electric stringers are often off by up to 15 lbs. Does a dropweight system distribute even tension throughout the stringbed? I also read that some machines make the tension at seperate strings different, such as the top cross string being very tight, and the middle ones loose.

If you buy into the constant pull argument, then the drop weight system is the purest form of constant pull. Gravity never lies, and electric machines simply try and emulate gravity. I strung over 800 rackets on a fixed clamp drop weight system before switching to a crank machine.

On a drop weight system, the string is pulled to the desired tension based on a fixed weight and the tension will not vary. Once the bar / weight is within 10 degrees, it is the most accurate system and does not require calibration. The knock on drop weight systems is it takes longer to string a racket and you lose 360 degree rotation. On my unit I could do a racket in about 25 minutes, 20 on the new crank.

I read where Martina Hingis’s mother strung Martina rackets on a drop weight system for over 5 years; supposedly she did not trust her rackets to stringers.

If you purchase one, make sure it has a clutch (easier to use), and I would definitely go with fixed clamps and a linear gripper. Tried several rotational gripper models, but for me linear is much better and easier. If you spend over $500 you spent too much.

These 3 all meet the above criteria:

1. http://www.newtechtennis.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=32&zenid=9b40285bcd19bbefed4d0052d0641933
2. http://www.mutualpower.net/sm.htm hercules 680 (cone lock clamps, make it harder to string)
3. http://www.eagnas.com/com710.html#pioneerdc

WhiteSox05CA
12-09-2006, 02:21 PM
Thanks a lot man. Big help, that was exactly what I was lookin` for. :D

I really like that Eagnas Combo 710. It seems to fit what I want really well. The only thing is, $320, which was more than I was looking to spend.

What about the Eagnas (are they a good brand?)...
Hawk 80?
Challenger I?
Flex 740?
or, GC II?

They all seem pretty similar.

westy
12-09-2006, 02:55 PM
barry, can you explain what the clutch thing is? as i have a dropweight i would like to know what the benefits oof having the clutch would be.

thanks

barry
12-09-2006, 05:04 PM
barry, can you explain what the clutch thing is? as i have a dropweight i would like to know what the benefits oof having the clutch would be.

thanks

I have owned 2 drop weight system. The first did not have a clutch and the linear gripper was at a right angle to the drop weight. It worked like this one. http://www.eagnas.com/maxgen/linear.html . Basically you have to re-pull the string if it does not drop level the first time. With the clutch you simple operate it like this: http://www.eagnas.com/maxgen/griprach.html.

The clutch is is much easier and faster to use and you do not need to re-pull the string.

I also like the Eagnas 710 and the Pioneer DC Plus, both are my top choices for a drop weight machine. Priced right and they get the job done. Both have identical mounting systems and have the better spring assisted clamps, something the Mutual power machine is missing. Cone lock clamps work well, but if you string any volume of rackets are slower and require more movement to set.

Nuke
12-09-2006, 05:17 PM
Westy, the clutch allows you to easily try again if your first attempt at tensioning the string is off. If the weight bar falls below the horizontal, you just grab the gripper cam and hold it in place while lifting the bar. Then you drop the bar again and see if you came closer to the horizontal position. This helps when you are beginning because without the clutch (like on a Klippermate) if you miss the horizontal, you have to lift the bar all the way and reposition the string in the grippers to try again. Klipper owners usually say its no big deal because you quickly learn to hit the horizontal on the first or second try. I can believe it. I have a Silent Partner Swing (clutch machine) and you really do lean to come pretty close after stringing a few racquets.

Some other stringers (Gamma X-2 and ATS Super Stringer, I think) have a ratchet sort of tensioner instead of a clutch. Not really much difference from the clutch except the ratchet is adjusted in discrete clicks instead of the smooth clutch. That's probably not an issue unless stringing quietly is important.

Bottom line: clutches and ratcheting grippers are a plus, especially for beginners, but not such a big deal once you are experienced.

westy
12-10-2006, 01:36 AM
oh right, it seems my machine has a clutch after all!! what a pleasant surprise!! i am looking to upgrade my machine after christmas. i dont know what mine is called but its dropweight, 6 point mounting system, flying clamps. i would defienetly want fixed clamps, but shouls i stay with dropweight, know my customers are used to the tension it gives, or go to crank? also, im in uk and machines are very expensive over here!! i will probably buy from Germany. does anyone have knowledge of pro's pro machines? here is their website http://www.arfaian.com/

Richie Rich
12-10-2006, 03:31 AM
i have an older drop weight (10 + yrs old) without the clutch and when i want to string a soft string i end up dropping the weight twice. what a pain. 18x20 racquet with 2 drops each string. arrrrgh! still only take 40 minutes so can't complain.

definately buy one with a clutch if i had to buy another one. what a cool thing.

WhiteSox05CA
12-10-2006, 07:43 AM
I have owned 2 drop weight system. The first did not have a clutch and the linear gripper was at a right angle to the drop weight. It worked like this one. http://www.eagnas.com/maxgen/linear.html . Basically you have to re-pull the string if it does not drop level the first time. With the clutch you simple operate it like this: http://www.eagnas.com/maxgen/griprach.html.

The clutch is is much easier and faster to use and you do not need to re-pull the string.

I also like the Eagnas 710 and the Pioneer DC Plus, both are my top choices for a drop weight machine. Priced right and they get the job done. Both have identical mounting systems and have the better spring assisted clamps, something the Mutual power machine is missing. Cone lock clamps work well, but if you string any volume of rackets are slower and require more movement to set.

Both pics look exactly the same if you ask me.