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<3Tennis
01-01-2007, 10:42 AM
I was wondering if the tension that you get from a crank machine, an electronic machine, and a dropweight machine are different.

The other day, I strung my racket up with 64 lbs of tension but when I gave my coach my racket he said it was a mere 50ish lbs of tension. I was shocked because I never realized that there was that big of a difference. He said that electronic machines have the most accurate tension, then comes crank ( he uses a crank ), and then a dropweight.

I believe the stringbed is really tight, but I dont understand how big of a tension problem this is.

Note: I use a Silent Partner Swing and strung my racket with Topspin Poly Polar

jj300
01-01-2007, 10:55 AM
your coach doesn't know stringing. do the good thing and don't listen to him. electronics are most accurate and produce the most consistent results time in and time out. dropweights produce similar results to electrics but are slower and depend on the user to be very consistent. cranks are accurate and consistent based on the operator and produce end tensions on average 5-10% lower than electric or dropweight

Dr. Van Nostrand
01-01-2007, 06:04 PM
Some past threads have described that not all electronic tensioners are created equal. In these threads the message has been don't assume because the tensioner is electric it is more accurate than a dropweight or crank and the least expensive stringers with electronic tensioners are not comparable to the electronic tensioners found on more expensive machines. As with any stringing machine you get what you pay for.

eunjam
01-01-2007, 09:20 PM
what did he measure the stringbed with?

anyways, even though roger federer's, maria sharapova's, rafael nadal's, (enter the name of your favorite player here)'s stringer can string at xx pounds, all stringmeters will show a large difference.

basically my point is, you can't trust a stringmeter what the tension is.

as long as the stringbed is consistent and the stringing is consistent, it is a good string job.

VGP
01-01-2007, 09:35 PM
<3Tennis - I'll disagree with a couple of the other posters and say that your coach is kinda right about the tension.

There's a difference between reference tension (the tension set on the machine while stringing) and actual tension (the tension coming off the machine and the time thereafter.

There is always a loss of tension during stringing and in the time after the racket is taken off the machine - even without hitting a ball. Your typical synthetic nylon will lose 8-10% tension overnight. Typical polyester more. Typical natural gut less.

Depending on your machine (and/or calibration), stringing technique, and string type, you could very well have a string tension in the low 50s.

As for the accuracy of the machines, there are differences. It's all in the calibration and the consistency of the user.

<3Tennis
01-01-2007, 10:10 PM
He doesn't use a "tension calibrator" to test the tension.

He pretty much just pushes down on the string bed and depending on how far the stringbed goes down, thats the tension.

The thing I'm worried about is that with this low 50 tension, I will ( in the future ) be generating power beyond my control. 60 Lb tension is the ideal tension for me but with the input VGP has given, I don't know how I will get that 60 lb Tension

eunjam
01-01-2007, 11:33 PM
He pretty much just pushes down on the string bed and depending on how far the stringbed goes down, thats the tension.



end of thread.

<3Tennis
01-02-2007, 02:53 PM
end of thread.

Haha thanks =]

OrangeOne
01-02-2007, 03:16 PM
He doesn't use a "tension calibrator" to test the tension.

He pretty much just pushes down on the string bed and depending on how far the stringbed goes down, thats the tension.

The thing I'm worried about is that with this low 50 tension, I will ( in the future ) be generating power beyond my control. 60 Lb tension is the ideal tension for me but with the input VGP has given, I don't know how I will get that 60 lb Tension

Please stop worrying so specifically about numbers. Please also don't run with your coach's '50ish' based on a push of the strings.

Keep a record of what tension you string at as indicated on your machine, and how the racquet plays after each hour or two. If you're not happy, add or subtract from it next time you string to suit. Sounds easy and logical - 'cos it is. The only thing I'd advise is being careful about going to high for the sake of your arm - but most already know this...

There was a whole thread on this before, here's the link below. I'd *really* advise reading and understanding Steve Huff's post #20....

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=110185