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View Full Version : Thicker string = less power/more control?


StunLock
01-04-2007, 09:56 PM
With everything else (tension, pattern, etc.) being the same, does thicker string (of the same kind) give you less power and more control?

Thanks!

vkartikv
01-04-2007, 10:51 PM
Definitely not more control. I don't use anything thicker than 17g, there is no feel and without feel I can't control my shots the way I want to - not that I am great at controlling them otherwise... ;) If you are an s&v player, nothing thicker than 16L really works, IMO.

snoflewis
01-04-2007, 11:33 PM
With everything else (tension, pattern, etc.) being the same, does thicker string (of the same kind) give you less power and more control?

Thanks!

like vkartikv said, a thicker string doesnt give you more control because there is less bite on the ball. not too sure about power...i would think 16g also gives less power than a thinner string because a thicker string gives a denser pattern...and a denser pattern has less power..

Bogie
01-05-2007, 12:37 AM
snoflewis is correct in that a thinner string will give you more control and more power than a thicker string but at the price of durability. it really comes down to whichever one you favor.

tlm
01-05-2007, 04:22 AM
I experiment with different strings all the time, thicker strings give more control period.There is no comparison, yes you can get more feel from thinner strings but not more control!

bluegrasser
01-05-2007, 06:26 AM
Thicker string = less power for sure, I found that out when i switched to a 17g for my Prestige, with the 16g there was little power and I really didn't care for the performance, but with the 17G the stick was a different animal.

WhiteSox05CA
01-05-2007, 08:07 AM
I think thicker gauges give you more control, thinner give you more power and spin, and maybe softer feel? I thought most pro's use a thicker gauge.

tennis_nerd22
01-05-2007, 08:24 AM
i believe that thicker strings = less spin, less power, more control, more feel/comfort

StunLock
01-05-2007, 09:45 AM
... because a thicker string gives a denser pattern...and a denser pattern has less power..

Thats exactly what I thought, thicker string makes the string bed more dead, less lively, which means less power. or look thicker string as a stiffer string (e.g. poly) just not sure about thet control part.

WhiteSox05CA
01-05-2007, 09:46 AM
From stringforum.net, gauges as follows...

Thinner= More elastic, less durability, more spin, more feel, more comfort

Thicker= Less elastic, more durability, less spin, less feel, less comfort

ferocious4hand
01-05-2007, 10:01 AM
thicker strings also maintain their tension better than thinner strings

StunLock
01-05-2007, 10:08 AM
From stringforum.net, gauges as follows...

Thinner= More elastic, less durability, more spin, more feel, more comfort

Thicker= Less elastic, more durability, less spin, less feel, less comfort

did they say anything about power/control?

well i'll take it more elastic = more power

WhiteSox05CA
01-05-2007, 10:38 AM
did they say anything about power/control?

well i'll take it more elastic = more power

Generally thinner gauge means more power. Thicker gauge means more control.

diredesire
01-05-2007, 10:44 AM
There is a difference of opinion in the thread, because, IMO, the definition of "control" is subjective. Some players like the spin control that a string provides, whereas others like the directional/placement control. I feel that a thinner string gives a little more bite, a little more depth/spin control, where a thicker string tends to give a little more directional/push control. As far as power, i think with ALL ELSE EQUAL (rarely the case between gauges), thicker strings tend to rebound less, which gives a little less power.

just my humble two cents.

WhiteSox05CA
01-05-2007, 10:50 AM
There is a difference of opinion in the thread, because, IMO, the definition of "control" is subjective. Some players like the spin control that a string provides, whereas others like the directional/placement control. I feel that a thinner string gives a little more bite, a little more depth/spin control, where a thicker string tends to give a little more directional/push control. As far as power, i think with ALL ELSE EQUAL (rarely the case between gauges), thicker strings tend to rebound less, which gives a little less power.

just my humble two cents.

I agree with you, same goes for racquet stiffness.

tlm
01-06-2007, 06:02 PM
I have used many different string set ups in my rds 001 mp, i have power so i am looking for control.It has surprised me how i will find a string that plays pretty good in 16 g.+ then try that same string in 17. + there is no comparison.

The 17g. turns my stick into a rocket launcher.You would never believe it was the same string but in a thinner gauge in the same racquet at the same tension+they play completely different.I have even uped the tension with the 17+it still sucks for control compared to the 16.

There is absolutely less control with thinner strings,depth or directional, as a matter of fact i really notice the 16 helping on the depth of my shots.There is a reason most of the pros use 16 g. string + a lot of them change racquets before a set is done!

Amone
01-06-2007, 06:26 PM
I have to respectfully disagree with Vkartikv. I was most adamantly a serve-and-volleyer when I used 15L Tournament Nylon (I know... terrible string. But I had a bad experience with Gamma, and now I'm sticking to my comfort zone, which is 'the cheapest stuff you've got.'). Of course, there'll always be exceptions to every rule, so I'll leave it at that.

armand
01-06-2007, 06:38 PM
There is a difference of opinion in the thread, because, IMO, the definition of "control" is subjective. Some players like the spin control that a string provides, whereas others like the directional/placement control. I feel that a thinner string gives a little more bite, a little more depth/spin control, where a thicker string tends to give a little more directional/push control. As far as power, i think with ALL ELSE EQUAL (rarely the case between gauges), thicker strings tend to rebound less, which gives a little less power.The Bringer of Truth has brung It.

Dunlopkid
01-06-2007, 07:00 PM
I agree. Control must be defined. Is control the absence of power? Is it the ability to harness the ball with lots of spin? What is it?

tlm
01-06-2007, 08:52 PM
If you know how to really put spin on the ball you dont need thin string, spin is technique.I use western grip with big topspin, i dont notice that much difference in spin production.The point is i use a lot of spin for my control+the 16g. has much better control even if it doesnt get as much spin.

Now the question is does control mean less power, to a degree of course it does.What would you get more control with a 115 sq. inch light stiff granny stick, or a 95 sq. inch players racquet?The players racquet of course, but you also wouldnt get as much power as the granny stick!

When i go from 16 to 17, i think the 17 gives a little more speed to the ball, it also makes a lot more balls go long.So even with the alledged added spin the ball is still harder to control.I play my best power tennis, which by the way is my strong point, when i use 16g. string.

With the 16 i can really cut lose + still keep the ball in+ i still can really blast it.If there is a little drop off in power it is more than made up for with the control.

With 17 i cant play as aggressive of a game because you have to put extra spin on the ball to keep it in.So it ends up taking power away from you + control!!

FH2FH
01-07-2007, 09:02 AM
With everything else (tension, pattern, etc.) being the same, does thicker string (of the same kind) give you less power and more control?

I think so. The only arguement for more control with thinner strings is spin, but spin isn't really controlled is it? There are so many variables that affect it. The main advantage of a thinner, inherently more elastic string is power. Relatively speaking, the more power you have, the less control you have. However, if you don't have enough power to begin with, going to a higher control setup will actually result in having not enough of either!!

[Case in point, I just got a stringer. Until I found a reference tension, my normal tensions were just way too tight. My stringer is nearly 10% tighter than the jobs I'm used to getting. While 10% doesn't seem like much, it's quite noticeable and drastically affected my shots. On the same racquet at 58lbs, I had to swing out for the ball to go beyond the service line. A day later at 52lbs my 3/4 swings send the ball near the baseline.

Some here will point out that drastic tension changes alone will only increase or decrease the velocity of the ball by something like 1% or so. While that may be true, where it lands on the court is not 1% deeper or shorter. Something I'm not going to explain (because I don't completely understand) happens here (trampoline effect, dwell time, etc???) that causes pretty major changes in depth of the shot. So anyway............]

It's all relative... In these subjective experiences, what is true for some may not be true for others [there is a RANGE for each individual], but generally speaking, yes, thicker = more control.

downey stringing master
01-07-2007, 02:23 PM
thinnner more feel and power and spin thicker one from 16L down are like garden wire

tennis_hand
01-08-2007, 06:43 PM
Having tried many strings, I've settled with 16g strings.
They are more durable and keep the tension much longer. Tension retention is the highest priority for me.
You can just rip the ball hard without worrying about the string will break. 17g just die out too fast for me.

16g is the most common among pros, some even with 15g. Minority of them use 17g.

ssjkyle31
01-08-2007, 06:57 PM
You do need to take inaccount the string pattern of your racket. 16g might be perfect for some of the open string pattern rackets for both spin and durability. While like my mids, I prefer 17 but if I stringing with more expensive multis or even Natural gut I would prefer 16g because of the durability issue.

no skillz
01-08-2007, 07:06 PM
Well, I am using Gosen Proform Tuff in 15g on my dunlop 200g which is 18x20 and I guess there is less power. I am going to try some new springs.

tlm
01-08-2007, 08:32 PM
To tennis hand,you are right on the money.