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KingBugsy
08-21-2004, 06:08 PM
Can someone give me some ruff guidelines on how long it takes for someone just starting out in tennis to reach a 3.5 level and beyond? Let's assume good athletic skills, mid 30's, and playing 2-4 times per week. Including lessons and drills. What would be considered an excellent rate of progress, what would a less than avergae rate be? How long to 3.5,4.0 and beyond?

Eric Matuszewski
08-21-2004, 06:59 PM
This will depend on,

#1) Your commitment

#2) The quality of your instruction

I did it with one guy in his 40's in 2 years, but he was a good listener and stuck to the plans.

Many people say they want to get there but really aren't able to commit to what it takes and prefer to just be "recreational" players.

Other commitments (family, work etc.) have alot to do with it.

Eric Matuszewski
08-21-2004, 07:03 PM
Other big factor is what nonspecific sports movement skills you have (from sports in college or as a teenager).

These can be used to build off of, especially basketball, soccer, lacrosse and other "ball chasing" sports.

goober
08-21-2004, 07:35 PM
This will depend on,

#1) Your commitment

#2) The quality of your instruction

I did it with one guy in his 40's in 2 years, but he was a good listener and stuck to the plans.

Many people say they want to get there but really aren't able to commit to what it takes and prefer to just be "recreational" players.

Other commitments (family, work etc.) have alot to do with it.

Well wouldn't you consider a 3.5 still a recreational player? I think a 3.5 is very doable in 2 years if you have decent hand eye coordination and athletic ability.

mistapooh
08-21-2004, 09:45 PM
i got to 3.5 in about a year. Getting the fundamentals down is the most important thing, then the rest is repetition and tweaking some shots.

Bungalo Bill
08-21-2004, 09:48 PM
This will depend on,

#1) Your commitment

#2) The quality of your instruction

I did it with one guy in his 40's in 2 years, but he was a good listener and stuck to the plans.

Many people say they want to get there but really aren't able to commit to what it takes and prefer to just be "recreational" players.

Other commitments (family, work etc.) have alot to do with it.



Well wouldn't you consider a 3.5 still a recreational player? I think a 3.5 is very doable in 2 years if you have decent hand eye coordination and athletic ability.

LOL, good point Goober - I say a year in a half!

Cypo
08-21-2004, 10:14 PM
Kingbugsy - to paraphrase Flander and Swan (I think) Tennis is like a tin of sardines, there's always that little bit in the corner you can't get out.

This time last year there was a woman at our club I though I should be able to beat but hardly could. Now I can beat her easily, but, now there's another woman at the club I think I should be able to beat....

My experience is that as long as you know you have more in you, your rate of improvement is always toooooooo slow !

Bungalo Bill
08-21-2004, 10:18 PM
Kingbugsy - to paraphrase Flander and Swan (I think) Tennis is like a tin of sardines, there's always that little bit in the corner you can't get out.

This time last year there was a woman at our club I though I should be able to beat but hardly could. Now I can beat her easily, but, now there's another woman at the club I think I should be able to beat....

My experience is that as long as you know you have more in you, your rate of improvement is always toooooooo slow !

:lol:

Eric Matuszewski
08-22-2004, 03:52 AM
I'm still caught up in USTA league play 3.5.

NTRP 3.5 is probably 2.5 in League play.

so yea, 2.5 in a year is reasonable.

polakosaur
08-22-2004, 09:10 AM
athletic ability paired with balance and coordination will really help. the better balance and coordination you have the faster and easier you will get the fundamentals and then you just have to PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE to get the muscle memory

kevhen
08-23-2004, 07:26 AM
I took a new player to tennis in his 20's with potential from 3.0 to 4.0 in doubles in about 2 years with lot of drilling and him playing me, a 4.0, quite often. He also read alot on technique, and taught himself that while I showed him how to play with strategy. He is a strong 3.5 in singles now but handles 4.0 level players in doubles because of his quickness at net. He was motivated to improve and stuck with me through all my criticisms and I hit him slow, hard, topspin, and slice shots so he was exposed to alot of different styles of play.

ferreira
08-23-2004, 02:48 PM
I'd say 4.0 in 3.5 years would be considered very good improvement. I starting reaching 4.0 in 4 years, playing at least 3 times a week from the second year. I'd say I'm starting to become a solid 4.0 at 4.5 years of play. But flaws are recurrent and the learning curve is not linear. I'd say 4.5 will take at least another 2 years to reach, at least, and 5.0, if ever, in 10 years of very focused play/drilling/exercise.

thehustler
08-23-2004, 10:36 PM
I'd say it can take a year or less. I went from not playing in 11 years to buying a new racquet, taking a few private lessons to learn the strokes and then tons of practice. Once I was confident enough I played random people at parks and just learned as I went. After about 6 months I was a 3.5 and I won the first tournament that I played in. Granted it wasn't as pretty as I'd have liked, but the end result was good. I've now spent the last few months working on technique and setting up plays on serve, return of serve and so on. I try to play daily if I can. It just depends on how dedicated you are and what your goals are. My goal is to be an Open player within the next 2 years and I figure I'm doing good so far. From what it sounds like you should be able to hit 3.5-4 in no time. Good luck.