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View Full Version : Are Stringing Machines Worth It ?


SamaRafa
01-14-2007, 10:32 AM
I'm Currentally considering buying a stringer, i just wanted to know if there worth it or not ?

power_play21
01-14-2007, 10:37 AM
this is so easy to answer.

to make it simple, lets only consider the economical aspect.

if you buy a 400 dollar machine, and it costs you, say 10 bucks to restring each time at your shop, and you are restring 2 raquets once every two weeks (or 1 raquet every week), itll pay for itself in 40 weeks, although the machine will pretty much last you your whle life.

Redflea
01-14-2007, 12:13 PM
On the $ side, it's pretty simple as noted. You will (sooner or later) get your money back. How quickly depends on your frequency of stringing your racquets and how much you pay for the machine. That math is pretty easy to do. If you string for friends and charge them, you'll make it back quicker. Could be months to years depending on the variables.

Other (maybe more important) factors:

- Will you enjoy the actual stringing process itself? Except for the first few times, it is a repetitive, somewhat mindless activity. It reminds me of working on my car, like when doing a brake job or oil change, where you know what you're doing and can "zone" a bit while you're doing it. I like that, as I find it almost therapeutic to relax and string up the racquet with music or a radio show on in the background. Someone else might find it maddening or boring...depends.

- Do you need/want to be able to quickly and easily make changes to your setup to try new strings, hybrids, and tensions? I love being able to decide to cut out my strings and put in a new set "right now!" whenever I want, for me or my sons, without having to take it to the shop and wait for them.

- Do you have room to store it and a place to use it that is convenient? This was more of an issue than I thought it would be. Had to empty part of a closet to have a place to store mine, decided to purchase an inexpensive cart to keep it on. Not a problem, but something that I hadn't thought too much about before it arrived.

I'm really glad I got mine, and have yet to see a post here with someone saying they regretted getting their own stringing machine.

Tennis_Gnat
01-14-2007, 12:19 PM
this is so easy to answer.

to make it simple, lets only consider the economical aspect.

if you buy a 400 dollar machine, and it costs you, say 10 bucks to restring each time at your shop, and you are restring 2 raquets once every two weeks (or 1 raquet every week), itll pay for itself in 40 weeks, although the machine will pretty much last you your whle life.

Wow. That sounds like a really good deal to me as long as there are solid machines for that price. Very tempting. I probably should've bought a stringer a long time ago given how much I break strings. Speaking of, I'll need to restring a racquet soon. It costs me at least 20 to restring, but then I'm not paying for string either. Still, it would eventually pay for itself.

A stringer has always been in the back of my mind. And now that I know how to string, it might be a good investment.

Well, so far, (I'm a newbie to stringing) I don't find stringing boring. I like mindless activities sometimes. I would love to be able to experiment more with my strings. As far as storage goes...who knows? Right now, I'm a college student and use the college's stringer. I really do wish I learned to string before and had got a machine earlier, too.

dowjones
01-14-2007, 12:24 PM
Read Redflea's post and pretend it was mine. Well said.

I own a machine and I'm glad I do. It got me closer to my game, I understand strings & rackets better now and it allowed me to experiment more at a cheaper price.

DJ

LttlElvis
01-14-2007, 12:31 PM
I have never met or heard of a person who did not get a positive return on investment in a stringing machine. You can spend $1000 and I bet you will get your money back in less than a year.

High school tennis players really should consider getting a machine. They are around plenty of others who are constantly breaking strings.

rasajadad
01-14-2007, 12:39 PM
Aside from the financial payoff, any serious tennis player needs to string their own frames for a couple of reasons: 1)You have to tinker with tensions, string types, hybrids to find out what you need. 2) You need racquets turned around QUICK! 3) You need to be sure the person who is doing the job is doing it right. 4) Consistency (stringing on the same machine every time.)

There are probably a few more that other posters will list.

Tennis_Gnat
01-14-2007, 12:49 PM
Dang it! You all are making me think I should really bit the bullet and look into stringers. Maybe look into them this spring and get one after the season. I can use the stringers at the school here during the season.

dowjones
01-14-2007, 01:27 PM
Start looking now for a good used machine.

Tennis_Gnat
01-14-2007, 04:17 PM
Where would be a good place to start? Aside from TW of course ;)
Any suggestions would be great. If you'd rather, you can email me at ladygnat@gmail.com or IM me. Thanks so much!

dowjones
01-14-2007, 06:24 PM
**** and craigslist has machines listed from time to time and even the For Sale section on TW Forum. I bought a Ektelon Model H for $200 on craigslist. It turned out to be a pretty good deal after I learned more about machines.

Do some searches here and at stringforum.net.

Good luck, DJ

hadoken
01-15-2007, 02:56 PM
I am in my mid-30's, and I have owned a stringer for years and all my friends who still play can't cost-justify it now because they don't play enough to warrant it, but they all regret not making that investment years ago. I don't think I would swallow $1000 machines, but $500 is a good ballpark price for a solid new or used stringer. Think about it....it's only $100 a year for the next 5 years...that's not a lot of money.

eunjam
01-16-2007, 10:40 AM
do you want to become a better player?

(i love answering a question with a question. my wife hates it.)

Tennis_Gnat
01-16-2007, 07:57 PM
do you want to become a better player?

(i love answering a question with a question. my wife hates it.)
Of course I wanna become a better player! hehe

Hahahaha! I love it that you answered with a question. I do it all the time myself. I don't mind getting a question as an answer, just when professors do it, it seems much more annoying.

Redflea
01-16-2007, 09:09 PM
Heck, I'm getting excited about it all over again. I think I"m gonna go buy another one. ;)

SamaRafa
01-17-2007, 11:48 AM
thanks you guys

also
what would be the best/cheapest but still good stringer to buy
(for my first)

varuscelli
01-17-2007, 11:50 AM
Heck, I'm getting excited about it all over again. I think I"m gonna go buy another one. ;)

Right, Redflea. Just keep feeding that addiction. :p

:)

Redflea
01-17-2007, 12:39 PM
Right, Redflea. Just keep feeding that addiction. :p

:)

LOL. :D It's not an addiction, it's an "intense hobby."

SamaRafa - there are a lot of threads here on which machine to purchase.

Remember that best and cheapest may not necessarily go together. If you really can't scrape up very much, there are options between 100 and 200, like the Alpha String Pal, the Silent Partner Swing, and the Klippermate.

varuscelli
01-17-2007, 12:58 PM
LOL. :D It's not an addiction, it's an "intense hobby."

I looked up "addiction" in on of my dictionaries, and it said "intense hobby." :)

Despite surface appearances, I think we're on the same page with this thing. ;)

:)

fastdunn
01-17-2007, 02:24 PM
I'm Currentally considering buying a stringer, i just wanted to know if there worth it or not ?

Let me give you stats among people around me.

Among the people I' hit with, there are about 5-6 people who invested in string machines. For most of them, it was a good investment.
They save money, they like the fact that they can experiment with
stringing freely and so on...

1 person did not like the hassle of stringing and he sold his stringing machine
on an auction site. Even though he breaks strings once every 2 weeks,
he went back to having someone string for him.

2 of them now have pretty solid customer base who have them string for them.... They are the type who like to work with machine and like to fix things, you know what I mean....

Me ? I started with a drop weight and now I have an electronic machine.
In my case, it's not much about saving money. I like to be in control
over the tools (stringing machine and racquet) I use....

VGP
01-17-2007, 02:45 PM
FWIW, I bought an Alpha Pioneer III about 14 years ago. I was breaking strings about every four to five hours of play when I was playing a lot more. I bought a stringing machine and it has more than paid itself off.

When I was getting back into the game, I paid local shops to string my frames but was dissatisfied with the stringjobs. Not bad, but not great. I had my stringing machine in storage. After a few times of outsourcing, I just had to dust off my Pioneer III and do it myself. I couldn't be happier.

The Pioneer III is a low-tech machine compared to what's out there today, but I still use my low-tech frames (thin, flat beams) so the mounting system is just fine. Works great and it has held up perfectly.

I also found I still enjoy stringing.