PDA

View Full Version : I hd backhand


steve s
08-23-2004, 05:47 PM
How do I make sure I'm getting low enough on the stoke. I seem to hit the net too much!!

Bungalo Bill
08-23-2004, 06:13 PM
You should see that your racquet is lower then the ball from a knee bend. The hand should be about 12 inches below the contact zone so you can go up to the contact zone. SO focus on where you think your going to make contact then drop the racquet/hand 12 inches below that. You need to use your legs on the onehander to get low and not by drooping the racquet face down.

You will see pictures of a pro dropping the racquet face lower than the hand, but you will also see a good knee bend.

Most good onehanders drop thehand before they go to the forward swing to around the mid thigh area, the rest of the lowering of the racquet is preformed by a knee bend.

JohnThomas1
08-24-2004, 03:19 AM
Bill could you possibly go into the intricasies of the pro dropping his racquet below the hand?

Chanchai
08-24-2004, 03:55 AM
(As always) pretty much what Bill says.

Both are the big factors. I would say bending the knees is huge because a lot of people developing their One-handers tend to be stubborn (refusing to do it or just not knowing that they're not doing it). And it's probably the simplest adjustment to make, once you're comfortable with proper footwork anyways.

When I was first developing my one-hander (when I was first learning tennis), I forced myself to do a low takeback. I'm glad I always did take back with both arms/hands btw--very important on a one hander (as well as all strokes) imo.

So this takeback that I forced myself to do for a few weeks was basically my left hand on the throat of the racquet, taken back down to my left hip. All I was intending to do with this was get a feel for a topspin drive with the backhand and sort of simplify the process (that was the hope anyways).

Once I got used to this and was getting medium depth with good topspin and able to return from various contact zones (especially low ones), I went towards the not so low takeback (my left hand on throat actually ends up almost shoulder high) and my backhand now dips down below my waist on most backhands and it's become my best stroke after some work. I'm comfortable hitting sharp angles as well as deep shots with the backhand.

The feel of the swing has been identical with various grips too.

Nobody really suggested to me that I should start out with such a low takeback (below hip), but it worked for me. I figure maybe it was worth considering for you, but maybe some people like Bill have something to say about that. It was just a means to an end for me and I got a feel for getting that racquet low on the swing.

But again, make sure you are bending those knees. Sometimes you will have to deal with shots so low that you're back knee might be very close to the ground. But in my case, it's been worth it. And I was still working on that low knee bend even with the low backswing I started with.

-Chanchai

steve s
08-24-2004, 06:39 AM
Great insight and key tips that I will work on!!!!!!

Bungalo Bill
08-24-2004, 01:06 PM
(As always) pretty much what Bill says.

Both are the big factors. I would say bending the knees is huge because a lot of people developing their One-handers tend to be stubborn (refusing to do it or just not knowing that they're not doing it). And it's probably the simplest adjustment to make, once you're comfortable with proper footwork anyways.

When I was first developing my one-hander (when I was first learning tennis), I forced myself to do a low takeback. I'm glad I always did take back with both arms/hands btw--very important on a one hander (as well as all strokes) imo.

So this takeback that I forced myself to do for a few weeks was basically my left hand on the throat of the racquet, taken back down to my left hip. All I was intending to do with this was get a feel for a topspin drive with the backhand and sort of simplify the process (that was the hope anyways).

Once I got used to this and was getting medium depth with good topspin and able to return from various contact zones (especially low ones), I went towards the not so low takeback (my left hand on throat actually ends up almost shoulder high) and my backhand now dips down below my waist on most backhands and it's become my best stroke after some work. I'm comfortable hitting sharp angles as well as deep shots with the backhand.

The feel of the swing has been identical with various grips too.

Nobody really suggested to me that I should start out with such a low takeback (below hip), but it worked for me. I figure maybe it was worth considering for you, but maybe some people like Bill have something to say about that. It was just a means to an end for me and I got a feel for getting that racquet low on the swing.

But again, make sure you are bending those knees. Sometimes you will have to deal with shots so low that you're back knee might be very close to the ground. But in my case, it's been worth it. And I was still working on that low knee bend even with the low backswing I started with.

-Chanchai

I agree with this. I think this may provide an example of what Chanchai said, go here and play the video:

http://tennis.about.com/cs/yourgame/a/bhonelowtsvid.htm

Bungalo Bill
08-24-2004, 01:08 PM
Bill could you possibly go into the intricasies of the pro dropping his racquet below the hand?

A lot of times you will see the pro angle the racquet downward before going forward when he drops the racquet down.

I believe this is to impart extra topspin as the racquet face is lifted back up to a level status at contact.

You might want to check out that analysis I did on Haas to see what I mean.

JohnThomas1
08-24-2004, 01:42 PM
Ok thanks Bill, i was thinking along the same lines. That i am thinking would mean they are even using a bit of supination on the ODD shot. I'm sure a few use it on sharper crosscourts, Flipper is one and even Haas has two very different follow thru's between DTL and CC.

JohnThomas1
08-24-2004, 01:45 PM
The best example of getting down low to backhands is Lendl, his back knee pretty much scraped the court at times. What a wonderful backhand drive he had too.

Bungalo Bill
08-24-2004, 01:45 PM
Ok thanks Bill, i was thinking along the same lines. That i am thinking would mean they are even using a bit of supination on the ODD shot. I'm sure a few use it on sharper crosscourts, Flipper is one and even Haas has two very different follow thru's between DTL and CC.

Speaking of Flipper I am studying his backhand for an analysis that will not be available on this board. I will give it to Yandell. Doesnt he have a tremendous backhand?

Do you know what he does to get some much command on it? Take a guess.

Chanchai
08-25-2004, 03:44 AM
Bill, where can I find that analysis you did of Haas' backhand? I'd really like to see that.

I read an article from Tennis One (it's no longer on there) that's credited to Nick Bolletieri on Haas' one-handed backhand and actually ended up using that high-speed footage of Haas as a model for what I'd like to do with my backhand. Was curious if you had any part in that article or if your analysis is similar or different.

I'm looking at the few vids on TennisOne on Scud's backhand and it seems like he follows a simpler model for power and drive on the backhand. Not overly integrating his legs or body into the backhand. My guess is that it's similar to what I think generates pace on my backhand: The leverage action that takes place between the elbow and the body (around the rib) which sort of has a catapault effect on the swing of the arm--sort of a combined action of body and arm. When I'm hitting my backhand like this though, I keep my body closed (shoulders perpendicular to baseline)--with Mark, seems like he opens them up, but I feel like it's more a follow through action than turning through the shot, but it's tough to tell for me, even on slow-mo.

On that leverage/catapault action I mentioned during the swing... To quote a Bolletieri video (Ballistic Backhands): "The ribcage acts as a fulcrum." Though I have my skepticism with Nick B himself, have to admit, I really feel my power on my backhand comes from that than anything else. Actually, to be more accurate--elbow is a bit extreme... I think tricep muscle is better?

Other notes on Scud... He keeps that head down and his racquet preparation is smooth as he steps in to take that ball with authority.

Anyways, that's my stab at the Scud backhand. I could be way off. I have to admit though... with the few videos I looked at... it looks like an uncomplicated backhand with very clean contact and what seems to be a powerful end result.

-Chanchai

JohnThomas1
08-25-2004, 04:11 AM
Yeah Bill i find Flipper's backhand one of the most underrated shots in the game. He can flatten it out, roll it heavy crosscourt or hit a penetrating slice. Without going into too much i find the standout points of his backhand to me are his perfect early preparation and his excellent shoulder turn. He does all the basics well but those points stand out to me. His genetics aren't too shabby either, he can generate amazing pace on any shot.

goober
08-25-2004, 08:24 AM
I agree with this. I think this may provide an example of what Chanchai said, go here and play the video:

http://tennis.about.com/cs/yourgame/a/bhonelowtsvid.htm

This guy doesn't look like he is bending his knees that much in the vid or is it just me?

lendl lives
08-25-2004, 09:27 AM
what works for me is watching. go watch 5.0 and open players. i have a two hander. but i watched this GREAT 5.0 player who was really smooth. he used feds older ps and hit lots of slice and one handed bh drives. good players show you the answers to your questions. for me i ssaw how important preperation and footwork are on the one handed bh drive especially. i think preperation is more important on this shot than any other in tennis. also to improve my contact point on the one hander i start my forward swing slow and then crescendo into the shot.

i played some lower level players last night and as a handicap i used my pro staff tour 90 and only hit one handed bh's. with the mental imagerey still fresh in my mind i was hitting it really well, to the point where i started to think maybe i should switch. lol...a one hander seems so much more dangerous if you can hit it. =).

lendl lives
08-25-2004, 02:39 PM
boy seems like all i can do lately is to think about my tour 90 and hitting a one handed bh.......might change after i play some better players though......