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View Full Version : Volley experts! Help!


gofederer
02-20-2004, 03:41 AM
I try to imitate the way Federer plays despite my lowly standard (4.0+?), but make far too many errors trying volleys (mainly on the fore side). My question is do you experts really use exactly the same neutral grip for both wings against shoulder-high drives? :oops:

Eric Matuszewski
02-20-2004, 04:15 AM
Guys who crush high forehand volleys rarely do it with a contenental grip this is a myth perpetuated by old school teaching pros who aren't watching slow motion video and who are just going by what someone told them 40 years ago. (No offense to being old school, there is some good old school advice but this is not it).

You will undoubtedly have trouble with high easy forehand volleys if you use a contenental grip to hit them. This is mainly because the wrist joint is at a heavy mechanical disadvantage with this grip and the ball impacts your racket harder on a volley than on any other shot. (Your closest to your opponent who just hit the ball at you and the ball has not lost any speed from hitting the court.

In defense of "Old School" advice. This technique may have worked at lower ball speeds (less force comming at you and driving back the hand) and with heavier rackets (more stability for the volleyer). But in the modern game your just gonna pop it up and get the next one rammed down your throught. Not a good way of gaining confidence at the net. It's funny pros say volley contenental and then scold Juniors for volleying less and less...

Forehand volleys are more efficiently hit with a more eastern grip. Even club Fed hits em this way. Make sure your pushing your racket thru the contact zone parrallel to the court (don't stop your hand or try to chop down, like a slice).
Tell me how it goes and spred the word.

gofederer
02-20-2004, 04:44 AM
thanks eric, that's what i suspected... i'll follow your advice this afternoon and, well, spread the word if successful :lol:

vin
02-20-2004, 05:31 AM
Well if you're a lowly 4.0, I'm an even more lowly 3.5, and certainly not an expert at the net, but I think I have some advice that may help. This comes from a pro that I've been working with.

I volley with the continental grip on both sides. I hit all volleys with slice and the pro had me change my high forehand volley to be flat. I was originally hitting it with underspin as you would a lower volley. I was told to have my wrist flexed back slightly with the racquet and the arm almost making an L. While maintaining this position, move your arm forward and hit through the ball without any wrist movement. While doing this, you should be moving your body forward as well. I was hitting very hard volleys this way and found it easier and more reliable than my previous method of slicing the high volley.

For myself, I think it is easier to volley this way than with a eastern forehand grip. Besides, it must be tough changing grips at the net when you don't have much time to react.

Vin

WW Volley
02-20-2004, 06:17 AM
I was told to have my wrist flexed back slightly with the racquet and the arm almost making an L. While maintaining this position, move your arm forward and hit through the ball without any wrist movement. While doing this, you should be moving your body forward as well. I was hitting very hard volleys this way and found it easier and more reliable than my previous method of slicing the high volley.

I completely agree with this advice. L with the arm. Move through the shot. SO important!

A volley comes more from proper rotation and moving the weight of the body through the ball. The idea with most volleys is to not add extra juice to the shot, but merely use the existing energy created by the other player and deflect it back. Often when players try to ramp up the juice, you see frame shots, mishits, etc.

Now certainly swing away at high floaters.

However, the majority of the time a continential grip will get the job done with great results. If you can, watch some videos of top volleyers from the pro game. Sampras, Rafter, McEnroe, etc. Each of these players demonstrates the "old school" qualities that allow for consistant and effective volleying.

grothman
02-20-2004, 08:19 AM
On forehand vollies, I've always been told to swing through like you're wiping dust off a flat dresser top :)

WW Volley
02-20-2004, 11:04 AM
On forehand vollies, I've always been told to swing through like you're wiping dust off a flat dresser top :)

Ha! That makese sense with moving through the ball while keeping a firm wrist and arm. I'll have to use that one.

gofederer
02-20-2004, 11:34 AM
All are very good tips :D

I played this afternoon bearing in mind eric's "more eastern grip" tip but unfortunately had not many opportunities to play that particular sort of forehand volleys :(

With my previous thought and today's small experiment, though, I could verify to myself a slight turn from the pure continental grip, say a quarter eastern forehand grip, was definitely more comfortable to deal with fairly quick chest-shoulder high drives, in the sense that it makes your wrist firmer and doesn't require your arm and wrist flexed back too much. And yet it affected my confidence when facing backhand side drives and proved more confusing overall. So I decided to stick to the one-grip policy even though I would continue to make poorer forehand volleys :)

jun
02-20-2004, 02:20 PM
More ofthen than not, it's better not to try to immitate pros...
You can watch learn certain elements of their stroke, but it's better not to immitate their swing. Instead, find a good pro and work on fundamentals, and develop your swing.

I would say Continental is way to go on volleys. It allows you to hit hgh-medium-low volleys. Some people say you should change grips on your volleys. But I am not a big fan of that. As you play higher and higher level of tennis, everything happens so fast. I don't know how you can turn your grip and stuff.

The only way to improve volley is just practice and practice and practice. It's the simplest shot in tennis, but you really need a good footwork and hand-eye coordination.

Bungalo Bill
02-20-2004, 04:41 PM
All the pros alter their grips (knowingly and not knowingly) from the base standard which is the Continental.

The myth to switching or altering grips in todays game comes from the belief that there is not enough time to do it. There is. If you can switch grips quickly on a bomb for a serve you can switch or adjust your grip quickly on a volley.

The key is where do you go. The Eastern grips place the wrist is a natural position but sometimes that is a bit extreme for most players. You will be able to hit very firm volleys but have to be careful on the low ones.

So the solution is to practice with the Eastern grips and as you get comfortable with hwo it works, move yoru hand more towards the continental to find the place YOU like to have it at. I emphasize you, because each hand and grips are different.

The key to allowing your grip to change quickly is by not having a firm grip before the change. Most players that complain they cant switch quick enough are usually holding the grip too tight.

Eric Matuszewski
02-20-2004, 08:54 PM
Kudos to all, lots of good critical thinking going on here. Bill, good point about grip switching. Another key here is learning to use your non playing hand constantly. This is an evolution of the game Laver and Emerson problably didn't have to consider (heavy stable rackets +lower ball speeds allowed for all purpose grips). Todays and tommorrows top juniors and pros are constantly changing grips by using the other hand (on the throught whenever they aren't swinging at a ball). So keep that other hand there and get a little left handed if your a righty.

sinoslav
02-20-2004, 11:48 PM
I'm a bit skeptical too that focusing on change of grip is going to get you very far in improving your volley if your grip is already continental.

Seems to me that Jun hit the nail on the head, practice practice practice. I too am a lowly 4.0 but in the past six months I've improved my volley a great deal, to the point that it is a real weapon rather than a joke. How to practice? First, volley is a great shot for practicing off the wall -- hit it over and over again without letting the ball bounce. It'll do wonders for your sense of feel for the volley. Second, when you're warming up with an opponent, spend a few minutes practicing the charge to the net by taking volleys starting from the service line and trying to get close to the net while volleying back. Allen Fox wrote about this technique in "Think to Win."

Bungalo Bill
02-21-2004, 12:17 AM
A pure continental grip is not a good grip for todays game. However, it does not mean you cant grip it like that and hit good volleys. It really depends on your hand and the grip your using.

With that said, top players alter their continental grip towards and eastern grip for their volleys, so there is a slight grip change. the reason for this is it is easier to hit down-the-line volleys vs. having a pure continental grip which favors a cross-court volley because of the wrist position.

This is something we teach at the Vic Braden college. But it certainly doesnt mean it is written in stone.

vin
02-21-2004, 05:49 AM
I think a lot of people naturally vary there forehand and backhand volley grip a bit, but only slightly enough so that both grips are still considered a variation of the continental. I think a lot of people do this without even realizing it. You naturally adapt to a grip variation that is easier for you. For example, you might shift the heel of your hand a bit to the right for a forehand volley and a bit to the left for a backhand volley. Your forehand volley grip is then a continental leaning towards an eastern forehand and your backhand volley grip is then a full continental maybe even leaning towards eastern backhand.

Man, you guys are killing me with these 'lowly' 4.0 comments.

@wright
02-21-2004, 11:53 AM
I've been having trouble with forehand volleys(my weakest stroke) and as suggested, today I hit a few with an eastern grip and it helped a lot, so much more solid and easy to punch it deep for a winner intead of popping up. The grip change won't cost me nearly as much as still hitting with a continental on FH volleys. THANKS

gza
02-21-2004, 11:58 AM
Hey Bungalo... didn't your name have a 'W' at the end of Bungalo'w'?

topspin
02-21-2004, 01:01 PM
It's really nice to see talk of this here. I once got rated by a coach and she drilled me for trying to volley with an eastern grip. I have now adjusted and try to use the continental, but it's very hard to get the same punch when going for a winner. The key is whethre or not you have time to switch grips correctly when you're at the net and under pressure.

tennis_hand
08-16-2006, 06:59 AM
by watching Federer's video, I found Federer is using eastern grip for forehand volleys. and you can see his forehand volley punch is very deep.

his backhand volley is more like continental grip. Some instructors actually say no time switching grip is BS. You will hit more balls by switching than not switching. I agree with this point. Using a continental grip, your forehand will have no punch at all, and very weird unless you are used to forehand slice.

Amone
08-16-2006, 07:18 AM
Hey Bungalo... didn't your name have a 'W' at the end of Bungalo'w'?
I thought so too for a while, but no, he didn't.

On the note of continental volleys-- If you're hitting a winner in the conventional sense off a volley, you're out of that realm now, and into the realm of 'swinging volleys.' A standard volley would be a winner of placement, and an eastern gripped volley would facilitate winners of power; all rules are out the window on swinging volleys, and you're just going for 'whatever works,' though you could easily hit both with a continental if you wanted to. So that's my feeling.

looseswing
08-16-2006, 07:46 AM
My coach a while back told me about the eastern fh volley grip. A good drill he did with me to practice volleys was to have me concentrate on each step individually. I would stand at the service line, split, turn my upper body while holding my raquet, move foreward hit the volley, and stop my upper body while still moving foreward. Hope this drill helps.

naturalgut
08-16-2006, 07:51 AM
I hit volleys with the continental grip off both sides. The most important thing to focus on is to have your racquet face pointing in the direction you want the ball to travel, while keeping your body weight forward.

Tim Henman uses an eastern grip on his forehand volley.

www.timhenman.org has some very useful advice on the volley, click on "tennis tips" and scroll down.

Rickson
08-16-2006, 08:12 AM
I try to imitate the way Federer plays despite my lowly standard (4.0+?), but make far too many errors trying volleys (mainly on the fore side). My question is do you experts really use exactly the same neutral grip for both wings against shoulder-high drives? :oops:
I can with a continental grip, but I sometimes turn to an eastern backhand for a bh volley and an eastern fh grip for fh volleys. It depends on the ball speed, but I usually wait in a continental.

tennis_hand
08-16-2006, 06:40 PM
I agree with Rickson that for defense volley, continental grip is the one for both back and forehands.
but for a little offensive forehand, eastern grip is the best to hit deep and fast.

Tim Set Match
08-16-2006, 06:55 PM
I would use continental when I go up to the net. You never know if the ball is going to come to your backhand or forehand, so continental would be the best way to react quickly. If the ball is slow, then you'll have time to change.

It also depends on where the ball is, like another poster suggested. Continental used with proper techniqe will allow you to hit balls of all heights with a good amount of success. If the ball is slow and at a decent height, I try to kill it without worrying about the proper grip, or proper volley technique.

Another thing is the type of volley you want to hit. If you want to drop the ball at the net, continental works well. If you want to send it towards the baseline use whatever you like.

Tennismastery
08-16-2006, 08:42 PM
It should be noted that while the continental grip is the foundation grip for most top players, they almost all deviate slightly for specific shots: High volleys can, and often are, hit with a more eastern grip.

However, in the process of learning to volley, many players start from an eastern grip on the volley. In many cases these players can't work with at all with the continental grip because of the extreme change in the feel and perceived strength. However, remember this too, that when working with any eastern forehand and backhand grip for the volley, the contact point changes, the racquet position to the forearm is different, and the body position is slightly different. Thus, it isn't just learning 'a new grip.' In my 30 plus years, it is far more productive to learn the continental grip and adjust naturally as needed, instead of trying to learn eastern grips then trying to learn the more advanced grip later.

tennis_hand
08-16-2006, 09:07 PM
why do you say continental is more advanced than eastern on the forehand side? Lots of pros use eastern on the forehand. They can punch deep and fast, also can hit flat hard for high volleys.

joe sch
08-16-2006, 09:30 PM
I believe even more important to all this discussion about grips is the elbow and contact point for making the volley. Effective vollies can be made with continental to eastern grips depending on player and contact location but its more important to get the elbow forward and try to punch the ball infront of your body as much as possible. Most poor volleys are performed with the elbow more to the side like in a groundstroke.

Tennismastery
08-17-2006, 06:05 AM
why do you say continental is more advanced than eastern on the forehand side? Lots of pros use eastern on the forehand. They can punch deep and fast, also can hit flat hard for high volleys.

Many pros use a hybrid grip on SOME forehand volleys, but selfom the eastern grip we see beginners use. Why do I say it is more advanced? Because eastern grips are used predominately by beginners. It is the grip that often prevents them from learning to volley more difficult, lower, faster or balls with a lot more topspin. It is the grip that promotes more topspin on the volley than the continental grip. It is the grip that players who try to hit correctly, tend to hit too flat and end up having to dink their volley since they hit it too hard. It is the grip that I have seen stagnate players in their effort to be more effective at the net. It is the grip that often prevents players from learning sharp angle volleys and touch at the net.

The continental grip, while takes longer for many players to gain mastery of, seldom leads to the kind of problems I see among hundreds of players who come to me with typical volley issues and are using the eastern grips for their volley.

Bungalo Bill
08-17-2006, 02:12 PM
Hey Bungalo... didn't your name have a 'W' at the end of Bungalo'w'?

Yes it did.

tennis_hand
08-17-2006, 05:01 PM
Many pros use a hybrid grip on SOME forehand volleys, but selfom the eastern grip we see beginners use. Why do I say it is more advanced? Because eastern grips are used predominately by beginners. It is the grip that often prevents them from learning to volley more difficult, lower, faster or balls with a lot more topspin. It is the grip that promotes more topspin on the volley than the continental grip. It is the grip that players who try to hit correctly, tend to hit too flat and end up having to dink their volley since they hit it too hard. It is the grip that I have seen stagnate players in their effort to be more effective at the net. It is the grip that often prevents players from learning sharp angle volleys and touch at the net.

The continental grip, while takes longer for many players to gain mastery of, seldom leads to the kind of problems I see among hundreds of players who come to me with typical volley issues and are using the eastern grips for their volley.


It is such old school of thoughts from the standard textbooks that eastern forehand volley is only for beginners. It does not matter what grip most beginners use. Many famous coaches are taking up the technique because they watch many pros using it. If it is effective, better learn it from beginners and the pros.

Tennismastery
08-17-2006, 05:53 PM
It is such old school of thoughts from the standard textbooks that eastern forehand volley is only for beginners. It does not matter what grip most beginners use. Many famous coaches are taking up the technique because they watch many pros using it. If it is effective, better learn it from beginners and the pros.

I'd like you to name one significant coach teaching players who move on to high levels of skilled play who teach the eastern grip volley (or any other grip as you mention it doesn't matter)... The top coaches that I speak with at national and international conferences beg to differ with your opinion. You have either never taught a significant number of players yourself, or you have no idea the frustration that exists when players learn inferior volley techniques and then want to change.

By the way, study the thousands of video clips available and note the vast number of top players using continental or hybid grips on both side. As with any pro, the ability to adjust the grip according to the desired shot has been mastered and evolved. If you watch the vast majority of players who learn the eastern grips for the volley first, you will see the ol 'windshield wiper' volley technique, (no backhand volley, just two forehands!) and you will also see someone who is very limited on their ability to volley in quick exchanges with two or four players at the net, and you will see their inability to volley with significant angle and touch, and you will also see their inability to hit lower volleys hit firm near their feet well or effectively.

Everyone who is learning to volley has a couple choices; learn with the continental and adjust as you gain feel, or learn the arguably easier eastern grips and then discover what hundreds upon hundreds of players do; their volleys prohibit them from becoming a more skilled volley player. Having taught probably ten times more players than any one writer on this site, I speak from experience...not from a perceived sense of what I feel is right. (By the way, I used to teach about 25 years ago, the eastern grips on the volley...I know what my students did then and what they do now. No comparison as to which students have progressed further.)

Readers, your choice. I offer my advice from a passion of hating to see players misled.

tennishack1
08-18-2006, 08:53 AM
To teach a straight continental first prohibits the student from gaining feel. Positive feed back from hitting the ball squarely, placing the ball, high balls so on and so forth. So I propose that players learn composite eastern/continental grips, which is what good volleyers at the pro level do anyway right?, and make minor adjustments right at the start of their career.

tennishack1
08-18-2006, 06:15 PM
By the way, study the thousands of video clips available and note the vast number of top players using continental or hybid grips on both side.

Having taught probably ten times more players than any one writer on this site

Readers, your choice. I offer my advice from a passion of hating to see players misled.

Its good you recognize that players use hybrid grips especially the best volleyers where a many poor vollerys use the straight continental I.E Roddick.

This other statement about teaching "ten times more players than any one writer on this site" is first of all very arrogant and secondly doesn't matter. A coach doesn't make a player he can only provide options for the player and what the player does with that information is up to he/she and they make themselves. Provide options, explain that while the continental is great for low balls and angles it is not great for high balls and hitting down the line. instead of just saying this is what you should do.:mrgreen:

Marius_Hancu
08-19-2006, 04:08 AM
If one wants to be stable from both sides, the continental would be the best choice, IMO, esp for low to medium high volleys, under heavy pressure.

However, for high volleys:

- you may want change the angle of the face racquet at impact, closing it a bit

- you may want to change the grip a bit, getting more on the side of the handle

Tennismastery
08-19-2006, 05:14 AM
Its good you recognize that players use hybrid grips especially the best volleyers where a many poor vollerys use the straight continental I.E Roddick.

This other statement about teaching "ten times more players than any one writer on this site" is first of all very arrogant and secondly doesn't matter. A coach doesn't make a player he can only provide options for the player and what the player does with that information is up to he/she and they make themselves. Provide options, explain that while the continental is great for low balls and angles it is not great for high balls and hitting down the line. instead of just saying this is what you should do.:mrgreen:

Having taught the numbers I mentioned has nothing to do with arrogance and everything to do with knowing what the consequences will be for the majority of players who learn with the eastern grips first. I can show you hundreds of video clips of players like Federer, Maurismo, Henin-Hardenne, Dent, Coria, etc., who use the continental grip on forehand volleys. Just because Roddick uses it too, but not as effectively or as well, doesn't make it a wrong grip.

A coach does make a player (or, a better phrase might be a coach can prevent a player from reaching their potential) by knowing what information will most likely be the best. A great coach knows what the limitations are of certain grips, strokes, strategies, and footwork, and a great coach knows what 'tools' will help them achieve the best methods. There are books and DVD's out there that can do what you mentioned...'provide information'. However, there are millions of players who have read books or studied tennis from this standpoint who never come near reaching their potential. This because the human response is to use patterns or methods that 'feel' comfortable. Using techniques that are foreign are not typically those that most players would automatically migrate to. (They tend to migrate AWAY from those techniques.)

Thus, like a piano teacher who teaches proper finger patterns that are not comfortable--but knows that the student needs to master them to master the instrument--is pushing the player to try things and practice things that they might never work on without such instruction. Tennis pros--those worth their fees--will do this same thing.

Finally, hitting down the line with a continental grip is no more difficult than with an eastern forehand or backhand grip. It is all about waiting for the ball a moment longer or turning a fraction more. A player can change the angle of the racquet at will. It is no different than hitting a cross court angle where the player learns to keep the racquet face angled correctly.

tennishack1
08-20-2006, 02:49 PM
A great coach knows what the limitations are of certain grips, strokes, strategies, and footwork, and a great coach knows what 'tools' will help them achieve the best methods.

Finally, hitting down the line with a continental grip is no more difficult than with an eastern forehand or backhand grip.

Interesting how you conflict yourself within one message post. Limitations of certain grips and then you say that it doesn't make a difference.
But you don't have to get defensive, it's just not fair to others on the board when you say that your advice is better cause you have taught so many more peopl than they have. It doesn't matter whether you have or not because there is always someone higher on the todom poll than yourself such as a Nick or Vic wouldn't you agree or would you say that you are the best coach in the World. If your not than name who you think is the best and we can all ask him about variations of the grip on the volley. :)

Amone
08-20-2006, 04:03 PM
Interesting how you conflict yourself within one message post. Limitations of certain grips and then you say that it doesn't make a difference.
But you don't have to get defensive, it's just not fair to others on the board when you say that your advice is better cause you have taught so many more peopl than they have. It doesn't matter whether you have or not because there is always someone higher on the todom poll than yourself such as a Nick or Vic wouldn't you agree or would you say that you are the best coach in the World. If your not than name who you think is the best and we can all ask him about variations of the grip on the volley. :)

Mate, you know that you're talking to the guy who runs TennisOne.com (senior editor), one of the premier tennis technique and coaching references on the web, right? Maybe not Bollettieri or Braden, but he's worked with them.

And I hate to say it, but what he's saying is that he's seen people try everything you're suggesting; his advice is better, because he's had the experience, he's seen it. That's what he's saying. So wether we like it or not, unless you've got some serious data to back it up, his opinion has a pretty proven track record, while you've only made 19 posts total.

I apologize for this semi-authoritarian outburst...

ryohazuki222
08-20-2006, 04:50 PM
i dont understand (not have i ever realized) that so many ppl have a problem volleying with the continental grip. IMO, it gives you a much firmer volley, thus increasing power and control. it is very easy/natural to hit backhands in ever direction... and as mentioned above, it is extremely helpful in hitting crosscourt forehand volleys. it is neither difficult or unnatural to hit a forehand volley down the line as suggested in some posts for me... (again, as mentioned earlier) it only requires a subtle change in timing and position..... but isnt that the same with normal forehands as well?

jeebeesus
08-20-2006, 06:13 PM
Mate, you know that you're talking to the guy who runs TennisOne.com (senior editor), one of the premier tennis technique and coaching references on the web, right? Maybe not Bollettieri or Braden, but he's worked with them.

And I hate to say it, but what he's saying is that he's seen people try everything you're suggesting; his advice is better, because he's had the experience, he's seen it. That's what he's saying. So wether we like it or not, unless you've got some serious data to back it up, his opinion has a pretty proven track record, while you've only made 19 posts total.

I apologize for this semi-authoritarian outburst...

Damn right. TennisMastery`s posts are one of those i print and file, along with those of Mahboob and Bungalo Bill. And i teach professionally .

tennishack1
08-20-2006, 09:32 PM
All the pros alter their grips (knowingly and not knowingly) from the base standard which is the Continental.

The myth to switching or altering grips in todays game comes from the belief that there is not enough time to do it. There is. If you can switch grips quickly on a bomb for a serve you can switch or adjust your grip quickly on a volley.

The key is where do you go. The Eastern grips place the wrist is a natural position but sometimes that is a bit extreme for most players. You will be able to hit very firm volleys but have to be careful on the low ones.

So the solution is to practice with the Eastern grips and as you get comfortable with hwo it works, move yoru hand more towards the continental to find the place YOU like to have it at. I emphasize you, because each hand and grips are different.

The key to allowing your grip to change quickly is by not having a firm grip before the change. Most players that complain they cant switch quick enough are usually holding the grip too tight.


Here is a person you named as a respectable poster saying the opposite.
I agree with Bill. Along with lots of data from teachers like Elliot Telcher, Paul Rotert, Vic Braden, Jack Groppel and others who say diferently and have been using high speed film for years.

I believe i options not just a blanket statement such as you MUST start with a continental. It doesn't matter who you are coach, player, poster, we all deserve the right to INFORMATION. That's all.:mrgreen:

Bungalo Bill
08-21-2006, 01:30 PM
I think it is obvious that TennisMastery knows his stuff. The Continental is the dominate grip for the volley for reasons that are obvious, not obvious, and those stated above.

However, I do not subscribe to the "Continental" only camp. I for one do not use a pure Continental grip for my volleys and volley just fine even at high speeds. My primary tennis "sport" is doubles and always has been.

If a player has used, is thinking about using, or is using an Eastern, they are very good volley grips. I am talking about the grip only. The grip itself is not the issue it is the time it takes to switch or alter the hand position to hit the volley cleanly - at high speeds. But these speeds need to be high indeed. However, an Eastern grip in and by itself is an excellent volley grip. In fact, if it was not for the critical element of time at advanced levels, I would use the Easterns as my dominant volley grip. I simply hit a more solid ball, my wrist is in a solid position, and I can send the ball easily in any direction. This does not mean this grip would be for everyone just like the twohanded backhand isn't for everyone.

The other thing about using the Eastern is the motion. A player needs to use the exact same motion as the Continental. It is no different. Coaches that allow a player to use the Eastern can't let natural tendencies to use a different motion take over. Like anything else it is learned. I have not taught as many players as TennisMastery, but I have not had horrific results having a player use an Eastern (AFTER ALL ELSE FAILS) while using a standard volley motion. I just haven't.

With this said, this does not mean TM hasn't or someone using an Eastern with an awkward volley motion has had an easy time moving to the Continental. I also believe TM on this and we should respect that. :)

tennishack1
08-21-2006, 01:41 PM
Nice Bill, that was all I was saying is that hitting a continental is not the only way to start or continue with or even end up at the highest level with I.E. Becker :mrgreen: Thanks, Bill