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danieljss
03-10-2004, 03:02 AM
Greg Rusedski has been cleared of a doping offence, despite testing positive for nandrolone.
The British number two failed a drugs test for the anabolic steroid in Indianapolis last summer.

He immediately protested his innocence and appealed the results at an ATP hearing.

Had he failed, the 30-year-old faced the possibility of a two-year ban and a premature end to his career.

Rusedski's defence centred around the case of Czech player Bohdan Ulihrach, who was cleared of a similar offence last year.

Ulihrach, and six other unnamed players, were exonerated when the ATP admitted their trainers may have been responsible for handing out contaminated supplements.

Camilio Pascual
03-10-2004, 03:16 AM
I hope Rude-ski loses to Agassi at the US Open and tells everybody what a bad player Agassi is.

pound cat
03-10-2004, 03:23 AM
This is a great outcome for professional tennis, and players must all be breathing a sigh of relief, although ATP may have some answering to do. The rationale for the judgment & the recommendations of the tribunal will be interesting. I can't imagine the turmoil had Rusedski been convicted.

Paul_G
03-10-2004, 03:37 AM
I am extremely pleased for Greg and can only imagine the relief he must be feeling.

He is a credit to British tennis and we need more like him, he is very professional n his manner and unfortunately like most things in life has the few negatives in his career pounced upon by the press.

I hope he has a sucessful end to his career over the next couple of years.

sliceroni
03-10-2004, 04:11 AM
Rusedski will need a lot more than just drugs to win anything, I doubt he'll win another tournament. Sorry but he's the BIGGEST sore loser on the ATP tour. After a loss his post match comments will frequently include "I lost to him today but I didn't think he played that well. I will be surprised if he wins his next match".

Rabbit
03-10-2004, 04:16 AM
Rusedski will need a lot more than just drugs to win anything, I doubt he'll win another tournament. Sorry but he's the BIGGEST sore loser on the ATP tour. After a loss his post match comments will frequently include "I lost to him today but I didn't think he played that well. I will be surprised if he wins his next match".

You know, saying something like that...."I lost to him today but I didn't think he played that well." Well, what does that say about Rude-ski's game? If he lost to a guy who wasn't playing that well. Sounds like an IQ test and Greg isn't doing too well.

sseemiller
03-10-2004, 11:53 AM
Long post alert. :lol: I thought some of you may be interested in this press release on Nandrolone.

March 10, 2004


ATP Expands its Efforts to Determine Cause of Low-Level Nandrolone in Test Results

Ø Hemmersbach, Ellicott to join on-going investigation
Ø Rusedski ruling underscores problem of contamination from supplements


Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, USA -- The ATP, governing body of the men’s professional tennis circuit, announced today an expansion of its efforts, first announced in July 2003, to identify the cause of the low levels of nandrolone or its precursors in anti-doping test samples. Two new experts have agreed to join the ATP investigation to determine the cause of low-level nandrolone in test results, and the ATP also will ask the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) to name a third member of the group.



The ATP appointed Dr. Peter Hemmersbach, who heads the doping analysis section at the Hormone Lab of the Aker University Hospital in Norway, and the Hon. Robert J. Ellicott, former Australian Solicitor General and Attorney General, to its investigation. The appointees will use scientific experts and investigators that they deem necessary to identify the cause, or causes, of low-level nandrolone readings in tennis players.



As Greg Rusedski announced earlier today, a Tennis Anti-Doping Program tribunal exonerated him of a doping offense. Rusedski was the eighth ATP player who had tested positive in cases involving metabolites of the prohibited substance nandrolone or its precursors dating back to August 2002. Tennis Anti-Doping Program tribunals dismissed seven previous positive cases in the summer of 2003 after they determined that the ATP was estopped from enforcing its anti-doping rules due to the ATP’s practice, halted in May 2003, of distributing nutritional supplements to players. Yesterday, an eighth Tennis Anti-Doping Tribunal rendered a similar judgement, dismissing the charges against Rusedski using the legal principle of estoppel.



“The Tribunal ruling underscores the problem of nandrolone contamination that we identified last year and still face today,” said Mark Miles, ATP Chief Executive Officer. “To date, the investigation has included interviews with more than 100 individuals, including players, officials and experts, along with thorough examination and analysis of all available data. Given that low-level trace occurrences appear to be continuing, we felt it important to re-double our efforts to identify the cause of these test results.



“We’re pleased that Dr. Hemmersbach and the Honorable Robert Ellicott have joined this effort, and we’re determined to provide them with all necessary resources to accomplish the goal of identifying the cause of the problem that was essentially non-existent prior to the summer of 2002.”



As the ATP announced on July 9, 2003, in addition to the seven players who had tested positive, a number of other player samples showed low-level trace readings of nandrolone or its precursors at levels so low that they were defined by the laboratories as not being doping offenses. The July 2003 report determined that the samples were “consistent with the oral administration of contaminated nutritional supplements” and “a player’s performance would not have been enhanced in any way by trace 19-norsteroid contamination of a supplement.” (For a full transcript of the ATP report, go to www.atptennis.com/en/antidoping.)



However, recent testing from several 2004 tournaments indicates that the occurrence of low levels of nandrolone and its precursors in anti-doping test samples continue. There have been no new nandrolone

positive samples since Rusedski’s case. But 16 low-level trace readings of nandrolone or its precursors, which are not doping violations, have been identified in 2004 tests.



Dr. Peter Hemmersbach, who heads the doping analysis section at the Hormone Lab of the Aker University Hospital in Norway, also is a member of the Games Group, an international specialist committee under the IOC umbrella responsible for the quality control of doping analysis during the Olympic Games. He serves as a professor in pharmaceuticals and doping analysis at the Pharmaceutical Institute of the University of Oslo.



The Hon. Robert Ellicott, former Australian Solicitor General and Attorney General, is a member of the International Amateur Athletic Federation (IAAF) Panel of arbitrators. Ellicott is a former judge at the Federal Court who was a member of the CAS ad hoc divisions at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney and the 1998 Commonwealth Games in Kuala Lumpur.



“As was the situation with the seven previous low-level nandrolone doping cases last summer, it is our responsibility to process each and every doping case,” said Miles. “The Rusedski tribunal concluded that he should have received personal notification of the risk of taking an electrolyte supplement previously distributed by ATP trainers, and that the ATP notices posted in the player newsletters, player intranet website and locker rooms were not adequate. We respect the authority and independence of the tribunal and are satisfied that the process was conducted fairly.”



About the Tennis Anti-Doping Program

The Tennis Anti-Doping Program is a comprehensive and internationally recognized drug-testing program that applies to all players competing at tournaments sanctioned by the ATP, WTA Tour and ITF. Players are tested for substances banned by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) list. In 2003, 1,382 tests were conducted on 357 different men’s professional tennis players. A top ten male player was tested an average of 13.9 times during the year, while a player in the top 50 was tested an average of 9.7 times. More background on the Tennis Anti-Doping Program, program penalties, statistics and testing procedure information can be found at www.atptennis.com/en/antidoping/.

Fee
03-10-2004, 12:30 PM
To me, there is something very fishy about this result. Too bad Graydon Oliver didn't get the same treatment.

@wright
03-10-2004, 12:42 PM
Too bad Korda didn't get the same treatment. It soured him on tennis.

magiset
03-10-2004, 01:35 PM
Could anyone name ALL seven other players that tested positive? Did they ever release all their names? Maybe I missed it.

pound cat
03-10-2004, 02:14 PM
I can't name even one other player..the names were never revealed as far as I know. Other than concluding Greg is innocent, why did it take them a month to conclude only that "he should have received personal notification of the risk of taking an electrolyte supplement previously distributed by ATP trainers, and that the ATP notices posted in the player newsletters, player intranet website and locker rooms were not adequate." That takes 2 minutes to figure out IMO

polakosaur
03-10-2004, 02:35 PM
i'm happy he was innocent there were so many factors and i don't think he would use a steroid like that, even though he is a sore loser sometimes that just means he cares about tennis and the game. Athletes who use steroids don't care about the game the just want the money.

Deuce
03-10-2004, 07:44 PM
He is a credit to British tennis and we need more like him...

Um..., Paul...

Rusedski is about as British as Todd Martin is Japanese.

@wright
03-10-2004, 07:50 PM
LOL @ Deuce.

Phil
03-10-2004, 09:14 PM
Rusedski is about as British as Todd Martin is Japanese.

Not unless Todd Martin's mother is Japanese and he has full Japanese citizenship...Rude's Mother is British, making him 1/2 of a Brit by blood, along with 100% by citizenship.

Deuce
03-10-2004, 09:37 PM
He was born in Canada. He grew up in Canada. He learned to play tennis in Canada. His Mother was born in Britain, and so she is British, I suppose. But Greg is not. He's Canadian.

Is Sampras Greek, or American? Is Agassi Iranian, or American? Even John McEnroe - who was born in Germany, but spent virtually no time living there - is he German, or American?

But - hey - if Arnold and Martina and Ivan and Monica can convince people that they're American... well, then, maybe Todd Martin CAN be Japanese after all, huh?

Phil
03-10-2004, 10:17 PM
Doesn't matter where he was born or learned to play tennis; the point is, Rude's mother is British, which makes him half British, 1st generation. Meaning, that although he WAS a Canadian citizen, and is also Canadian by blood, he can legitimately call himself British based not only on a legality (i.e. citizenship), but on blood. Sampras, Agassi and Mac are Americans and don't claim to be anything other than that-born, bred and legally red, white and blue.

I'm not certain, but I think Mac was born in Germany bcause his parents lived there at the time-his father was stationed on a military base in Germany. Like all US military personnel, Mac Sr. was there representing his country, not trying to be a German-hence, a **** poor example on your part. I've lived in other countries, but that association doesn't make me anything other than what my passport says I am. THINK before you post.

Re. Arnold and Martina, et al., they don't need to "convince" people that they're American-they ARE-they have passed through all the requirements necessary to become American citizens, just as your own relatives once did (unless you're a Native American), and just like Rude did to become Brit.

The Brits don't consider him legit because he isn't from there originally, and the Canadians are just ****ed off because he blew off that country, for whatever reason. As for the Brits, other than Tim, who else do they have? May as well accept him, 'cause it doesn't look like they're going to do any better with home grown talent.

topspin
03-11-2004, 01:59 AM
good 1 Deuce, I was gonna post something about that comment but you beat me to it :lol:

topspin
03-11-2004, 02:05 AM
BTW the reason Rusedski left Canada is simple, money! At the time, Canada was cutting back sports programs because things like health care and social services were much higher on the priority list. Then, after some dismal performances at Olympic games, the govmt decided to start funding sports once again. The fact that there was a huge surplus in the govmts treasury didn't hurt.