PDA

View Full Version : Wall drills anyone?


Thor
01-24-2007, 09:12 AM
Since i dont have to many people to hit with,im forced to go back to the wall.
The only problem is that its like squash - i hardly finish my swing and i must prepare for the ball coming back,anyone can help on this and give some good exercises?
thanks

fearless1
01-24-2007, 12:17 PM
Step back, hit the ball higher/slower; use a racquet ball instead of a tennis ball, etc.

The important thing is to vary the drills so you are hitting all kinds of shots under many different circumstances....slow, fast, high, low, close to wall, far from wall, etc.

Thor
01-24-2007, 12:40 PM
thanks,but could you please elaborate?
and what is a racquet ball?

thanks

learn2relearn
01-24-2007, 02:12 PM
try letting the ball bounce twice so it doesn't mess up your footwork too much using the wall. or maybe practice generating lots of top spin so the ball bounces higher off the ground after coming back from the wall - to give you more time. i think the walls are great opponents, especially when working on the stroke, centering the ball and timing. not sure it's good for footwork though...

you can maybe work on your foot work separately by doing footwork drills on the court yourself.

games - maybe hit different sequences of panels. maybe chalk out some target boxes on the wall. that kind of thing to keep it fun and challenging.

Bagumbawalla
01-24-2007, 04:10 PM
In my opinion, practicing against the wall is one of the best things you can do.

I get to the courts early, around 6:00-7:30 am, depending on the time of year.

First (after warming up) I hit groundstrokes against the wall-- some from the baseline, some fron closer in. Sometimes I will tape a small towel or target and try and hit it every time.

Then I practice volleys, standing about six or eight feet from the wall, then move in closer.

Then I practice overheads, alternating between forehand and backhand.

Then I practice serving and half-volleys.

Then I get on a court and serve until my hitting partner shows up, then we drill and possibly play a game of singles or doubles.

B

fearless1
01-24-2007, 08:36 PM
thanks,but could you please elaborate?
and what is a racquet ball?

thanks

http://www.usra.org/

Compared to a tennis ball, a racquetball is a smaller, denser, usually darker colored hollow rubber ball that has no felt covering at all too. So, it's bounce is considerably livlier and it retains much of its initial velocity due to lower air resistence too. Most of my tennis wall practice is with a tennis ball. However, when I use a racquetball, it's becuase...

...it's return velocity is faster and more representative of what I encounter on the tennis courts (without having to hit harder if using a tennis ball instead);

...allows me to hit from further against the wall and still get single bounces;

...the smaller darker colored racquetball is harder to see and makes me concentrate more;

...wall practice is murderous on tennis ball life...racquetballs hold up much better;

...However, the racquetball's lighter weight makes for a significantly lighter impact feel off the string bed. Fortunately, to me, this doesn't affect my consistency and accuracy at all.

As bag has already demonstrated, all shots you can hit on a tennis court can be practiced against a wall. In some ways, wall practice is superior to court practice, especially for consistency. As your game improves, so will the length of your practice rallies. This in turn can lead to some very intense drill/practice sessions...hitting shot after shot after shot...with very small amounts of time wasted picking up tennis balls if on the tennis court. For groundstroke practice, try to hit 100 shots "inbounds" in a row (ie, hitting area about 3 to 6 feet above the painted net line).

Lob/overhead practice against a wall is very effective. Hit a lob against yourself, let it bounce, hit the ball down into the floor so that it bounces upwards then ricochets off the back wall to give yourself another lob to hit out of the air (only the first lob is hit off the floor). It's going to take some time for you to figure this drill out in terms of aiming, timing, and power in such a way to sustain a lob/overhead rally against yourself. When you get good at it, you should be able to sustain say 20 shot rallies doing this drill (that's one lob to start the rally, 20 or so overheads until you miss or hit a winner against yourself.

Many wall drills available....just determine in your game what you would like to fix/strengthen then create a wall drill that addresses those issues.

[ GTR ]
01-25-2007, 04:30 AM
Thanks fearless1, I'll be trying out the lob/smash drill. I also practice a lot on the wall, because I don't like playing any of my friends because they aren't any good. I like the wall because it helps me become more consistent in a real match. I don't like when the ball has a lot of fur(lol, forgot what the green stuff is called)because the ball always bounces twice and too low for me, so I need to wear them out a bit. Lucky for me I get good half used quality balls (every fortnight around 25 balls) for FREE!:D

Duzza
01-25-2007, 04:58 AM
Hey has anyone ever beaten the wall? I'm still going.

Thor
01-25-2007, 08:15 AM
http://www.usra.org/

Compared to a tennis ball, a racquetball is a smaller, denser, usually darker colored hollow rubber ball that has no felt covering at all too. So, it's bounce is considerably livlier and it retains much of its initial velocity due to lower air resistence too. Most of my tennis wall practice is with a tennis ball. However, when I use a racquetball, it's becuase...

...it's return velocity is faster and more representative of what I encounter on the tennis courts (without having to hit harder if using a tennis ball instead);

...allows me to hit from further against the wall and still get single bounces;

...the smaller darker colored racquetball is harder to see and makes me concentrate more;

...wall practice is murderous on tennis ball life...racquetballs hold up much better;

...However, the racquetball's lighter weight makes for a significantly lighter impact feel off the string bed. Fortunately, to me, this doesn't affect my consistency and accuracy at all.

As bag has already demonstrated, all shots you can hit on a tennis court can be practiced against a wall. In some ways, wall practice is superior to court practice, especially for consistency. As your game improves, so will the length of your practice rallies. This in turn can lead to some very intense drill/practice sessions...hitting shot after shot after shot...with very small amounts of time wasted picking up tennis balls if on the tennis court. For groundstroke practice, try to hit 100 shots "inbounds" in a row (ie, hitting area about 3 to 6 feet above the painted net line).

Lob/overhead practice against a wall is very effective. Hit a lob against yourself, let it bounce, hit the ball down into the floor so that it bounces upwards then ricochets off the back wall to give yourself another lob to hit out of the air (only the first lob is hit off the floor). It's going to take some time for you to figure this drill out in terms of aiming, timing, and power in such a way to sustain a lob/overhead rally against yourself. When you get good at it, you should be able to sustain say 20 shot rallies doing this drill (that's one lob to start the rally, 20 or so overheads until you miss or hit a winner against yourself.

Many wall drills available....just determine in your game what you would like to fix/strengthen then create a wall drill that addresses those issues.

Well,mainly consistancy,forehand and especially backhand

thanks for the great help

Nuke
01-25-2007, 10:26 AM
Hey has anyone ever beaten the wall? I'm still going.

Chuck Norris has beaten the wall. Twice. The wall will not play Chuck Norris again.

Haasquet
01-25-2007, 11:01 AM
Chuck Norris has beaten the wall. Twice. The wall will not play Chuck Norris again.

...and both rallies had an infinite number of shots, right?

spinning09
01-25-2007, 06:35 PM
chuck norris does not return a ball from the wall. the wall returns a ball from chuck norris.

ubel
01-25-2007, 08:48 PM
If you don't feel like you have enough time, you may be swinging too hard/too fast for your own good or you may be too close to the wall. Always use good balls, and count how many steps from the baseline to the net you are on a real court, and mimick that distance against the wall. In the beginning your focus should be on clean, centered contact with the ball and timing it well enough to create a rally. Building consistency is key to allowing you to execute your strokes more rapidly and with ease.

Wall drills can be very fun, and if you've developed enough consistency you can take it to the next level. If you want to make most, you've really got to think about what you're doing. During the middle of drilling, even during a long rally, I'll sometimes stop mid-stroke and reflect on my strokes: is my footwork allowing me to hit each shot with consistency, am I making clean contact, am I centering every shot, how much topspin am I putting on the ball, am I timing the ball well, how much clearance am I getting, etc. Questioning and trying to understand my strokes helped me get closer to realizing small problems that added up to huge hitches in my stroke, and allowed me to make my strokes feel much more natural and have a lot more power.

Thor
01-26-2007, 06:00 AM
Hey everyoe,thanks for the tips,i had a great 2 hour session today,i really felt that i improved in the second hour - could hold longer rallies.
Overheads was a great tip Bag,thanks a lot.

Does anyone know how to practise volleys?
thanks again

BeachTennis
01-26-2007, 06:29 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLQveR8zuvY