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View Full Version : Confusion about treatment of Tennis Elbow


destan
08-26-2004, 10:06 PM
I am confused…

I have just seen an orthopedic doctor today regarding my TE and he told me to take complete rest. That includes no conditioning (swimming, going to the gym etc) until the pain is totally gone, and the TE will then be cured.

I used to think that I should start conditioning once the pain starts to subside, which I did. In fact, I have the impression that conditioning is extremely important so that the TE does not recur. The doctor told me that if I continue to use the muscles before the pain is totally gone, the pain will never go away.

Can anyone comment on that? I am confused as I have learnt before that I should continue to use those muscles so that they do not degenerate, and moderation is the key. Now, I do not know what to do…..Is there anyone out there with medical background, or who has such experience, comment and share with all of us? Please help!

bruce
08-27-2004, 12:04 AM
I mostly agree with the doc, for the following reason: tennis elbow is an inflammation of the tendon that connects your forearm muscle(s) to the elbow; thus, using them in ways that continue to strain the tendon will prevent it from fully healing. The thing is, the contraction of your muscles needs to pull against something to move your forearm/hand/whatever, and one anchor is the injured tendon.

I don't think conditioning is the key to preventing TE. My hitting arm muscles are all pretty well conditioned. The trouble is, you cannot condition your tendon, and overuse (aka too much conditioning) can damage it (of course, discounting technique fault as a factor)

I am working through a rest period of my own for this. I'm at 4 weeks and it's only now feeling like it's healing. Hopefully, a couple more weeks'll do it.

Good luck with it,
Bruce

polakosaur
08-27-2004, 01:54 PM
www.ctcream.com

i used this cream and it helped me relieve the tennis elbow, take like 2 weeks off and use this cream it will help, try to put it on like 3-4 times daily for faster results. and after your tennis elbow goes away use it like once a day like right before bed to help your arm continue recovery.

http://www.sportsunlimitedinc.com/dynprogyrex.html

this gizmo is the best thing in rehab, i think this is the single best thing for tennis elbow it massages, stretches, strengthens, all at once

i would also suggest starting on a weight training program for you arm for wrist curls for your extensors and flexors and ulnar and radial deviation. If you get the book complete conditioning for tennis it will show you the exercises in the book.

Start on a stretching program, tennis elbow is caused when the little muscles in you forearm tear and thats whats causes pain. they tear cause they're tight thats why you need to warm up and stretch.

another great exercise is the reverse dumbell curl. grab a dumbell (i sggest starting with a low weight) with a dumbell curl your palm is facing up and you curl. with a reverse curl your palm is facing down and you curl up.

Get therabands. There like the rubber hoses with handles on the end great for warm up.

My warm up.

i do 1-2 minutes with the dyna flex than i stretch
i do 12 reps of reverse curls with the therabands and i do 12 reps of curls with the therbands.
stretch
then another 1-2 minutes for dynaflex gizmo and stretch and then i play

I really suggest the dynaflex ball it will really help

paulfreda
10-07-2004, 06:47 AM
Please see my take on TE here ....

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/viewtopic.php?t=14999

I agree that you first will need to rest until the pain is gone.
It wil not be easy to stay off the court, but take my advice
and do NOT fool around with TE. It can be a killer to get
rid of. My post describes how a I beat it for good.

Hope it helps you.

PugArePeopleToo
10-07-2004, 11:06 AM
I had a case of tennis elbow last year. It had gotten so bad that I can't even hold on to the beer bottle after playing. I tried everything short of leech. The only thing that worked was stop playing and let it heal naturally. I now play 3 times a week relatively pain free....if anyone is in the market for a leech, please let me know.

Marius_Hancu
11-29-2004, 04:54 PM
Check the links on:
TE (Tennis Elbow) and Golfer's Elbow
Great fitness sites
in my posting at:
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=33800

In general, I have to agree with your doc.

NoBadMojo
11-29-2004, 07:54 PM
i would also agree with the doc. tendonitis often can be made worse by things like conditioning and stretching..often you end up further damaging already damaged tendons by trying to stretch and condition them and your condition can become very chronic. i've never had TE, but have had very chronic achilles tendonitis, and the stretching was making it worse. when you do come back...a TE support, religiously icing RIGHT after, and non steroidal anti inflammatories (alleve not advil) would help avoid a recurrence

Marius_Hancu
11-29-2004, 08:33 PM
I had a case of tennis elbow last year. It had gotten so bad that I can't even hold on to the beer bottle after playing. I tried everything short of leech. The only thing that worked was stop playing and let it heal naturally. I now play 3 times a week relatively pain free....if anyone is in the market for a leech, please let me know.

Now, when you came back, what did you do differently?

You probably changed something (racket, strings, tension, technique, your conditioning, etc).

Marius_Hancu
11-29-2004, 08:43 PM
i would also agree with the doc. tendonitis often can be made worse by things like conditioning and stretching..often you end up further damaging already damaged tendons by trying to stretch and condition them and your condition can become very chronic. i've never had TE, but have had very chronic achilles tendonitis, and the stretching was making it worse. when you do come back...a TE support, religiously icing RIGHT after, and non steroidal anti inflammatories (alleve not advil) would help avoid a recurrence

I am of two minds on this. I had both TE and heel problems (bursitis).

In terms of TE, I found that stretching and weight training helped, but only after I let it heal completely. Even then, I started stretching first, then low loads (3lbs, now I'am at 20lbs for bicep and forearm). Everything very gradual.

However, in terms of heel, I have to agree with NoBadMojo, stretching didn't help, it irritated it. I found after one year that my shoes were the problem.

Check this on Plantar Fasciitis
http://www.drpribut.com/sports/heelhtm.htm
esp the tests to be done on tennis shoes for proper sole flexibility
first time I am able to find them ....

Also for the heels, I used the information at:
http://www.heelspurs.com
http://www.heel-spur-treatments.com

Perhaps these heel sites might help with Achilles, not sure ...

Ice was good in both cases, however it does not solve the problem by itself.