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View Full Version : Proper grip for forehand slice approach shot?


goober
08-29-2004, 04:44 PM
I have been trying the forehand slice approach shot when a ball is hit short and low to my FH side. I have been using my volley grip (eastern)and chop at the ball like a half volley almost but this is making the ball sit up or the shot has no pace ending in an easy winner for my opponent.

I normally have a semiwestern grip now but I find topspin very difficult to do consistently on these low approach shots. Is it better to hit a flat shot or is my grip/swing wrong?

8)

Aoya
08-29-2004, 08:55 PM
I would never hit a forehand slice on a approach. If it were that low and short, I'd rather hit a good drop shot and make my opponent come in..if it's good enough, then he can't hit a hard put away shot anyway..and you're already at the net, ready to outvolley (which should be easy, considering that you just need quick angles..and that coming off a drop shot, you don't have many angles to work with).

kevhen
08-30-2004, 09:43 AM
I hit with Eastern forehand slice for all shots including the approach. You do have to get used to hitting the ball within about 6 inches from hitting the net but you don't have to hit it hard or deep to keep it low and difficult to return but you do need to get it to clear the net by less than 6 inches or so for it to stay low, so it must be practiced as often as possible. I would not describe my approach slice as a chop shot. I sort of glide through the ball with just a little bit of wrist scoop or chop but not much at all. I aim the ball straight ahead and charge in behind it.

Skinny Dip
08-30-2004, 12:44 PM
Just had a tennis lesson where the coach said serves, slices, volleys and overheads should all be done using the continental grip, whether forehand or backhand. Sounds good to me.

finchy
08-30-2004, 01:38 PM
my backhand slice is a regular eastern backhand grip though.

and dont "chop" at the ball. ur not supposed to use your wrist much at all on the slice. its supposed to be still the whole time. the slice goes from high to low to high again. u use your whole arm. go through the ball more for more depth.

kevhen
08-30-2004, 02:52 PM
Yeah, the wrist is pretty much still with the forearm moving slightly down, forward through the ball, and slightly across the body. It should be fairly fluid, one motion, in one direction, keep it simple, like you were hitting baseball grounders with one arm.

kreative
08-30-2004, 05:19 PM
continental and remember to follow through, don't chop

papa
08-30-2004, 05:36 PM
I agree with Aoya, not sure that is the best shot selection - seems to me that it might be one of the worst. The slice seems to work the best when the ball sits up and not in the situation you are talking about.

Your going to net a lot of balls by trying to slice low shots regardless of where they are.

goober
08-30-2004, 07:41 PM
I agree with Aoya, not sure that is the best shot selection - seems to me that it might be one of the worst. The slice seems to work the best when the ball sits up and not in the situation you are talking about.

Your going to net a lot of balls by trying to slice low shots regardless of where they are.

Well my BH slice approach is very reliable whether the ball is high or low. I guess I can go to a flat forehand approach since the topspin is definitely not working.

ma2t
08-30-2004, 09:14 PM
I agree with Aoya, not sure that is the best shot selection - seems to me that it might be one of the worst. The slice seems to work the best when the ball sits up and not in the situation you are talking about.

Your going to net a lot of balls by trying to slice low shots regardless of where they are.

Well my BH slice approach is very reliable whether the ball is high or low. I guess I can go to a flat forehand approach since the topspin is definitely not working.

If your opponent hits a low, hard, heavy, skidding slice, it will be difficult to do anything with that ball. If the ball sits up at all, you should be able to hit topspin but you need to move up quickly so that you are next to the ball right after it bounces and I would recommend not trying to hit the ball really hard. You will need a tremendous amount of racket head speed though. A slice forehand approach might work. You could try adding a little sidespin to your slice so it curves away from your opponent's backhand. I would think that a flat forehand would be very difficult f you're hitting a low sliced ball. Hitting it into the net or long would be easy to do.

Just my .02

kevhen
08-31-2004, 06:22 AM
You don't have to hit the slice hard, just deep, so your opponent has no pace to work with for his passing shot and will likely throw up a lob instead so don't get too tight to net. You can slice approach low or high balls. I usually come in on any short balls whether they are high or low. I hit the higher balls harder but not giving pace and hitting short or slow seems like it's just as effective. Patrick Rafter used to hit deep crosscourt slice approaches with his backhand and they would land inches from the baseline but would setup for the opponent, but with no pace to work with, it wasn't easy to pass him.

andreh
08-31-2004, 10:20 AM
I hit it with and Eastern Forehand - same grip as with a topspin forehand. I don't use that stroke much though. I prefer to hit a hard topspin forehand that wins the point directly or forces a misstake. I slice on backhand approaches.

kevhen
08-31-2004, 01:39 PM
Yes, on higher short balls, I am starting to just rip for topspin winners or errors these days, but on low balls it's easier for me to hit a slow slice approach and come to net behind all using the Eastern grip. Sometimes on the real low very short balls I will slice the ball out in front of my body if I am struggling to get to it, and now the ball has lots of sidespin on it and can be tricky for the opponent to read as well.

Bungalo Bill
08-31-2004, 03:22 PM
continental and remember to follow through, don't chop

I do not recommend a pure continental for the forehand slice, I will move it more towards the Eastern forehand grip. The Eastern forehand grips helps stabilize the forearm movement and to maintain a firm wrist.

In order to develop a good forehand slice, practice freezing the racquet swing when you make contact with the ball. The swing path should come from a higher position from the incoming ball and then flatten out as it makes contact.

You do not want to hit the ball with force, just let the racquet drop in the groove and glance the ball. Freeze and balance yourself on your front foot. Hold it for 5 seconds. By doing this you will learn how to time the ball, balance yourself in the shot. You will also learn what racquet face angle you need and will learn what wrist position, swing path, etc, you need to produce a certain slice.

I usually aim for the top half of the ball just above the balls center in order to not "CUP" the ball underneath which floats it long. If you are off balance the arm usually compensates and the racquet face turns or your wrist turns the entire racquet right before contact. This produces numerous errors.

The main thing about the forehand slice is, it is not a "forced" anything. Just glide the racquet into the ball. All you have to do is focus on racquet path and racquet face angle. Use gravity from the somewhat low to high swing to provide the right amount of power.