PDA

View Full Version : Shoes for Bad Knees


matchpoint54
02-12-2007, 07:00 PM
Now, I have bad knees, and they can't absorb impact very well. I have been wearing the MDP's but I need new shoes now, because they're old and have been worn down. One thing that I didn't like about the MDPs were they were very heavy, but were comfortable. Can someone recommend me a shoe that's lightweight, but absorbs impact for my knees?

Voltron
02-12-2007, 07:12 PM
I would say any Adidas a3 shoe, or the Barricade IVs. I too have bad knees, and ankles..... anyway, I use the Barricade IVs, and I love them.

heycal
02-12-2007, 08:19 PM
Now, I have bad knees, and they can't absorb impact very well. I have been wearing the MDP's but I need new shoes now, because they're old and have been worn down. One thing that I didn't like about the MDPs were they were very heavy, but were comfortable. Can someone recommend me a shoe that's lightweight, but absorbs impact for my knees?

Reebok Netmaster's have a good reputation among some, and some of the New Balance shoes too. Check user feedback on the TW pages on shoes you hear about and interest you.

backcourt
02-13-2007, 09:29 AM
I think a good orthodic or insole is extremely important, as the factory insoles in sneakers usually add very little cushioning. I recomend the New Balance athletic arch insole (something like that) which adds a great deal of cushioning and arch support. I think they go for about $25 a pair. I use them with Reebok Upset DMX shoes and get a lot of cushioning for my bad knees. BTW " " " are still available at TW for $39 if you can deal with the Shiraz color; a very well cushioned shoe and work well for my wide feet.

nn
02-13-2007, 10:31 AM
one shoe RBK Netmaster (I had same problem and now no problem)

backcourt
02-13-2007, 10:58 AM
one shoe RBK Netmaster (I had same problem and now no problem)

They look like they have awesome cushion in the outsole. I have stayed away from them because I hear they aren't very wide. Is this true?

nn
02-13-2007, 01:00 PM
They look like they have awesome cushion in the outsole. I have stayed away from them because I hear they aren't very wide. Is this true?

I think medium width surely not very wide ( NB has three sizes)

heycal
02-13-2007, 03:36 PM
They look like they have awesome cushion in the outsole. I have stayed away from them because I hear they aren't very wide. Is this true?

True. They look narrow, and feel narrow. I was nervous about this, but it hasn't caused me any problems. My normal size was too tight in the toe though and I had it stretched at a shoe store.

Nice looking shoe too, unlike the MDPs...

siow_a
02-13-2007, 06:21 PM
Yonex 304 are great for my knees. 305's are a little narrower and same level of cushion. Like them better than the netmaster. Better than the Barricade IV(it is more narrow than the Yonex 304/305) Agree with everyone that a good insole helps with cushioning.

backcourt
02-14-2007, 09:32 AM
I think medium width surely not very wide ( NB has three sizes)

I checked TW and they claim the Netmaster 2 is medium/wide. I will have to try a pair on once my Upsets wear out. I wear a 2e IN NB, but have found the Upset dmx's to be about that same width, and I like to cushioning better.

backcourt
02-14-2007, 09:33 AM
True. They look narrow, and feel narrow. I was nervous about this, but it hasn't caused me any problems. My normal size was too tight in the toe though and I had it stretched at a shoe store.

Nice looking shoe too, unlike the MDPs...

Thanks for the info, I wonder if the new model is a little wider as TW claims.

heycal
02-14-2007, 01:52 PM
Thanks for the info, I wonder if the new model is a little wider as TW claims.

Where do they claim the new model is wider?... In any case, I'm pretty sure I have the new model, in stylish white with black and red, and I found it be both tight in the toes and narrow over all, not to mention hard and somewhat uncomfortable in the soles/arch. The narrowness made me afraid I was going to topple over in them, but I haven't yet... Overall it's a decent shoe with some decent cushioning for the knees based on my limited experience in this area, and despite some of my complaints about this shoe, I might purchase another pair someday but would probably get a 1/2 bigger than I normally wear.

I currently have three shoes, the Netmasters, the MDP's, and the NB 653's. I generally wear the Netmaster's on hardcourt, the MDP's when I audition for clown jobs at the circus, and the NB 653 on clay since they generally feel the best to me. If my life depending on winning a match I happened to be playing on hardcourt, I'd reach for the NB's then as well.

slice bh compliment
02-14-2007, 02:45 PM
My knees are not the best. They used to be worse. I probably could be a candidate for some scraping...some surgery, but here's what helps me keep playing fairly aggressively.

1. Fresh Thorlos and a thin cotton-blend running sock over them.
2. Rotating three new prs of shoes every few months. I use Babolats, but I do not think thebrand is critical. I just think they've got to be fresh, supportive and they've got to fit well.
3. A lot of stretching of the hamstrings and the quads. I use a big ball, the tennis net and the railing of the back porch.
Some massage of the muscle that runs beside the shin. Some linament.

My buddy who is a great tennis coach recommends shark cartilage, chondroitin, glucosamine....stuff like that. Swears by it, actually. Yoga, too. Says it has kept him in the sport. I have not done it yet, but I probably will at least try it by this spring when I go back to playing a lot more.

Also, playing on clay might help, too.

heycal
02-14-2007, 02:49 PM
My knees are not the best. They used to be worse. I probably could be a candidate for some scraping...some surgery, but here's what helps me keep playing fairly aggressively.

1. Fresh Thorlos and a thin cotton-blend running sock over them.
2. Rotating three new prs of shoes every few months. I use Babolats, but I do not think thebrand is critical. I just think they've got to be fresh, supportive and they've got to fit well.
3. A lot of stretching of the hamstrings and the quads. I use a big ball, the tennis net and the railing of the back porch.
Some massage of the muscle that runs beside the shin. Some linament.

My buddy who is a great tennis coach recommends shark cartilage, chondroitin, glucosamine....stuff like that. Swears by it, actually. Yoga, too. Says it has kept him in the sport. I have not done it yet, but I probably will at least try it by this spring when I go back to playing a lot more.

Also, playing on clay might help, too.

Why the thorlos, and why the running sock over them?

slice bh compliment
02-14-2007, 03:04 PM
I have gotten used to the cushioned feel of the Thorlo. I find a cushy sock is much better than a cushy shoe (which feels odd when trying to move well on a hard court).

The thin oversock makes it so the Thorlo does not slip around in the shoe. I am between sizes, and this also helps me fit perfectly into a larger sized shoe, which feels so much better on the foot than the size my foot actually is supposed to be according to the Brannack device (sp?).

Ever since I went to this set up (nine or ten years ago), I feel like I walk on air... and I have not had a blister, even in the summer heat.

heycal
02-14-2007, 11:58 PM
I have gotten used to the cushioned feel of the Thorlo. I find a cushy sock is much better than a cushy shoe (which feels odd when trying to move well on a hard court).

The thin oversock makes it so the Thorlo does not slip around in the shoe. I am between sizes, and this also helps me fit perfectly into a larger sized shoe, which feels so much better on the foot than the size my foot actually is supposed to be according to the Brannack device (sp?).

Ever since I went to this set up (nine or ten years ago), I feel like I walk on air... and I have not had a blister, even in the summer heat.

I own a couple of pairs of the level 2 thorlos, and while I agree they can be slippery, I don't feel the need for an oversock yet. what level do you wear? Also, do you feel the amount of cushioning one gets from a mere pair of socks, even if they are the mightly thorlos, could actually be enough to help the knees?

I like the thorlos, but just wear regular socks when I'm wearing highly cushioned shoes like the Netmaster's. Cushioned socks plus cushioned shoes feels a bit much to me...

slice bh compliment
02-15-2007, 07:52 AM
Level three. The original. And, yeah, the cushioning is definitley there. Maybe it is in my head, but I can definitely feel the difference between a good thick orlon sock and a thin cotton one. I feel it in my feet....which makes me feel like I feel it in my knees.

And again, I love thicker socks because I prefer a lower, less cushy, performance shoe.

The Level 3 Thorlo's cushioning is remarkable until you get them sweaty. Lucky for me, I do not sweat that much in the lower body.

Anyway, the OP's question was about shoes, so, sorry to derail. I just wanted to express that I feel fresh socks can allow you to wear a lower profile shoe.

HappyLefty
02-15-2007, 08:18 AM
...My buddy who is a great tennis coach recommends shark cartilage, chondroitin, glucosamine....stuff like that. .
I use these pills:
http://www.vitaminworld.com/pages/Categories.asp?xs=B7CDE4C169974BF295E490DEA8F764A6&CID=31

backcourt
02-15-2007, 10:39 AM
[QUOTE=heycal;1251858]Where do they claim the new model is wider?...

In TW's description on the product page the call them "medium wide." I think they described the prior model as medium width.

heycal
02-15-2007, 02:01 PM
In TW's description on the product page the call them "medium wide." I think they described the prior model as medium width.

For some strange reason, my memory bank does not contain the previous description of the Netmasters... But we're debating "medium width" versus "medium wide"? I'm not sure the wordsmiths at TW are choosing their words with as much care as you might think. I would disregard their exact words on this matter and ask other users, or better yet, try on a pair yourself.

s_andrean
02-15-2007, 03:52 PM
Nike Air Max Breathe Free II's

Great cushioning.

SalvadorVeiga
02-15-2007, 06:21 PM
you should go to the orthopedist or whatever the name is there in US (foot doctor :D ) and ask him to make you some foot pads for sports...
I had a knee tear ligament, and my doctor told me to get one of those since they correct your posture, the guy will make custom foot pads for you according to your feet morphology...then just take your tennis shoes' originals footpads out and put the customs one...they do wonders... I hurt my knees a lot cause of surfing and tennis too... and since I use those footpads it has been a dream... make sure to state you play tennis (he will make them extra cushioned) I actually use them on a daily basis on my normal shoes (my doctor told me to...)

Serious get one of those you can't go wrong...or just ask a specialist

hope i could help

slice bh compliment
02-15-2007, 06:23 PM
Podiatrist. Yeah, I hear it is expensive but worth it.

NoBadMojo
02-15-2007, 07:34 PM
everyone has different feet so advice on a certain shoe isnt going to get it i dont think. have you considered custom sports orthotics? lots of the pros use these. those allow you to use almost any decent fitting shoe...you just remove the insole that comes w. the shoes and slip in your custom orthotics, and move them from shoes to shoes. this gets your feet striking properly, your arch just right and a good amount of support..cushioned insoles, thick socks and such dont really give you the type of cusioning you need i dont think..you need something more supportive and rigid, but would be a good idea to choose a shoe with a softer sole even if they wear out much more quickly..those hard court compounds are prety jarring i think no matter what kind of socks you use

heycal
02-15-2007, 08:11 PM
It's my understanding that custom-made orthotics are very expensive, not to mention the cost of seeing the podiatrist. Now, perhaps you will need to go that route someday, but I personally wouldn't start down that road before seeing if some other, more cushioned shoes would be of help, since there are many accounts around here of people experiencing great improvement simply by switching shoes.

Also, a knee specialist I consulted about my own sore knees suggested that if I were interested in orthotics, I should first try some cheap store-bought inserts and see if those worked before going out and spending a bunch of money. She also gave me some simple strengthening exercises for my quadriceps that I do every day. Between that, different shoes, and probably luck, my knees feel a tad better than they used to.

NoBadMojo
02-15-2007, 10:34 PM
It's my understanding that custom-made orthotics are very expensive, not to mention the cost of seeing the podiatrist. Now, perhaps you will need to go that route someday, but I personally wouldn't start down that road before seeing if some other, more cushioned shoes would be of help, since there are many accounts around here of people experiencing great improvement simply by switching shoes.

Also, a knee specialist I consulted about my own sore knees suggested that if I were interested in orthotics, I should first try some cheap store-bought inserts and see if those worked before going out and spending a bunch of money. She also gave me some simple strengthening exercises for my quadriceps that I do every day. Between that, different shoes, and probably luck, my knees feel a tad better than they used to.

orthotics can be covered with someones health care and you dont have to see an podiatrist to get custom orthotics
i dont recommend cheap store bought inserts...the name alone tell you something. they usually dont fit right unless someone happens to match precisely into small medium or large and i've seen more people messed up by these than helped. if you do use these, read the fine print as they arent for certan types of feet structures and there are lots of disclaimers and caveats on some of these cheap store boughts.
i have been using mine for about 4 years now, and they still work fine..a cheap investment considering they cured a chronic condition, but admitedly they are not for everyone and should be adjusted to slowly and consult a physician if there are multiple issues

meh
02-15-2007, 10:43 PM
NBMJ makes an excellent point: cushioned shoes are fine, but a rigid insole that cups your foot is crucial as well. However, there are some alternatives to expensive custom orthotics.

Spenco makes some over-the-counter orthotics that can be heated, and then molded to fit the foot. Personally, I haven't had much success with these, but YMMV.

I've been using "fitted" orthotics. They're not personally custom, but my podiatrist had several pre-made molds, each of which he tested against my foot, much like shoe/shirt sizes. If you can find your foot shape this way, then it's highly cost effective. I pay $40 per pair, and found an excellent fit that I've been quite happy with. I've also tried custom orthotics, and in either case, my foot/knee pain has subsided.

heycal
02-15-2007, 10:57 PM
orthotics can be covered with someones health care and you dont have to see an podiatrist to get custom orthotics

Where/how does one get custom orthotics if no podiatrist or doctor is involved? How much do they generally cost?

Also, might we speculate that custom orthotics might be more important to those with diagnosed foot problems than a guy with sore knees looking for some added cushioning?

courtrage
02-16-2007, 07:13 AM
...
but would be a good idea to choose a shoe with a softer sole even if they wear out much more quickly..those hard court compounds are prety jarring i think no matter what kind of socks you use

i didnt even think of that! dont know if you remember but we talked about my achilles issue a while back and it seems that in the fila punto i have little to no issues...they dont last me but like a month so i suppose they are softer than barricades...also noticed they sit real low ...especially in the heel...i noticed with other shoes when my heel is too high it bothers my tendon keeping it contracted like that...vapor speeds caused no real issue...after these punto wear out i'm using the bf2 again and seeing if the higher heel starts to hurt me again...keep in mind i use all these shoes with the stock insoles...

NoBadMojo
02-16-2007, 07:47 AM
i didnt even think of that! dont know if you remember but we talked about my achilles issue a while back and it seems that in the fila punto i have little to no issues...they dont last me but like a month so i suppose they are softer than barricades...also noticed they sit real low ...especially in the heel...i noticed with other shoes when my heel is too high it bothers my tendon keeping it contracted like that...vapor speeds caused no real issue...after these punto wear out i'm using the bf2 again and seeing if the higher heel starts to hurt me again...keep in mind i use all these shoes with the stock insoles...

i play on the dirt, but when i do go on the hardcourts and if i use a shoe with a hard court sole, i can feel the shock in my old knees and i dont think i even have knee problems. so i use the feather2's which is my normal shoe and get a much more comfortable ride when i am forced into hardcourt duty.
i do remember we had a conversation about achilles some while ago, as i had a chronic 8 year <or so> dance with achilles tendonitis (tendonosis)which is finally gone. i seemed to have taken the opposite approach..i dont think those shoes that put you low in the heel are good for your achilles...they cause you to hyperextend your achilles...i had them build rigid heel lifts into my orthotics which prevents the achilles from hyper extending on the long axis, and the rest of the orthotic keep them from twisting laterally. this was good advice i received from a physician friend who is also a mountain climber..seems as though mountain climbers get this malady pretty frequently. did your problem not go away?

courtrage
02-16-2007, 09:04 AM
i play on the dirt, but when i do go on the hardcourts and if i use a shoe with a hard court sole, i can feel the shock in my old knees and i dont think i even have knee problems. so i use the feather2's which is my normal shoe and get a much more comfortable ride when i am forced into hardcourt duty.
...
did your problem not go away?

i think i had tendonitis brought on by bursitis...cause i noticed the prob wasnt always just the tendon...felt pain/impact on the back of the heel...maybe the tendon was rubbing the bursae wrong or the heel strike was sending the impact to the back corner of the heel...noticed that barricade2 i had seems to stick out way back in the heel cause of the heel counter...vapor speed seems to not have that buldge in the back...
it basically went away...i think it seems that my calves get tight easy cause they are huge (built like a soccer player) so a higher heel shoe keeps the tendon too short(my theory). as for hyperextending, i think a shoe with a low heel wouldnt be a hyper extension unless your heel sinks in(as with what i've heard air units are bad because that happens)...for all i know these shoes are so thin that i feel the court better and am mindfull of how i move or when a shoe is real cushioned like the bf2, i do more heel landings cause i know the heel is cushioned...
it really does feel that when i'm in the bf2 and get low reaching for a ball or something(like running for a low dropshot), my tendon feels really shortened/compressed...almost feel heat in the tendon after force like that...but i do notice that when my foot/ankle twists weird i feel pain in the tendon so i may have a weird gait...


...
i do remember we had a conversation about achilles some while ago
...

you got mad at me :-) hehe

Svenskpor
02-16-2007, 10:52 AM
I have the knees of a very old man which is sad for a guy in his mid 20s. I use the Nadal-style knee band things which help, I think I'll try the orthotic option too

SalvadorVeiga
02-16-2007, 11:43 AM
everyone has different feet so advice on a certain shoe isnt going to get it i dont think. have you considered custom sports orthotics? lots of the pros use these. those allow you to use almost any decent fitting shoe...you just remove the insole that comes w. the shoes and slip in your custom orthotics, and move them from shoes to shoes. this gets your feet striking properly, your arch just right and a good amount of support..cushioned insoles, thick socks and such dont really give you the type of cusioning you need i dont think..you need something more supportive and rigid, but would be a good idea to choose a shoe with a softer sole even if they wear out much more quickly..those hard court compounds are prety jarring i think no matter what kind of socks you use

thats pretty much what I said, I have a pair of those and they do wonders... Yeah they get kind of expensive but they are durable and worth it...I never complained about my knees again... mines here in Portugal custom made by a professional were 65 dollars...

NoBadMojo
02-16-2007, 01:35 PM
thats pretty much what I said, I have a pair of those and they do wonders... Yeah they get kind of expensive but they are durable and worth it...I never complained about my knees again... mines here in Portugal custom made by a professional were 65 dollars...

Salvador..yes. I meant to acknowledge your post because I think that is good advice for many people.. I think we're worth the extra money if it makes us well and gets us back on court and playing pain free.
I got mine online, and you also get to consult with the doctor as necessary if you have special needs and he will further customize them for you. yours were very inexpensive..the price of a pair of shoes no?