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View Full Version : Agassi's Groundstrokes and Returns


FH2FH
02-14-2007, 06:08 AM
What made them so special? Why was he one of, if not, the best at returning and taking the ball early?

I have noticed many, possibly most, of his shots were open stance. The mechanics are very efficient and uncomplicated. I guess that's really the key, but I'm wondering what some of you think.

Swinging Simian
02-14-2007, 06:19 AM
I rather think it was his ball sense and anticipation that made his returns and groundstrokes lethal (still is from all those exhibitions).

downey stringing master
02-14-2007, 07:20 AM
agassi has natural everythinng as he get older he hit more open , he was so effective because he always stuck to basics line and length had a good mentality apart from 1 or 2 mishaps , unlike murray for eg his drop shot return winner 2nd serve aces arent percentage tenis

raiden031
02-14-2007, 08:04 AM
He's known for great hand-eye coordination, so he was able to hit cleaner than most players. I don't know much more about this, but I was wondering do statistics back up the claim that he is the best returner or is this something you have to observe for yourselves?

noeledmonds
02-14-2007, 08:20 AM
The debate about who is the best returner will always rage on. Some players return more balls back in play than Agassi, but Agassi hit more winners and unreturnable shots off the return. Agassi also has a habit of playing the big returns on the big points. Personally I belive Agassi is the greatest returner of all time, but it is very hard to prove this with statistics.

FH2FH
02-14-2007, 08:34 AM
But what did he do differently than other players? All of these players have exceptional timing. Was it just the he practiced returning and hitting on the rise more than everyone else?

I think of all the practices I've done and watched other people do and I can't think of a single time when I've practiced, or watched anyone else practice their returns. Everyone practices the serve, which is supposed to be the most important shot, with the return being second. Yet it is never rehearsed! The only thing I can imagine is that he had balls just belted at him from an early age. I think I read that at some point, but I can't remember.

raiden031
02-14-2007, 08:37 AM
But what did he do differently than other players? All of these players have exceptional timing. Was it just the he practiced returning and hitting on the rise more than everyone else?

I think of all the practices I've done and watched other people do and I can't think of a single time when I've practiced, or watched anyone else practice their returns. Everyone practices the serve, which is supposed to be the most important shot, with the return being second. Yet it is never rehearsed! The only thing I can imagine is that he had balls just belted at him from an early age. I think I read that at some point, but I can't remember.

He is more likely to stay slightly inside the baseline than other players, maybe he decided early on that he didn't want to resort to standing behind the baseline, and thats why he got so good at taking balls on the rise and returning.

drakulie
02-14-2007, 09:22 AM
He had short "uncomplicated" swings, excellent hip and torse rotation, and impeccable hand-eye coordination.

spadesss
02-15-2007, 06:05 AM
he was a excellent ball striker.
even when he was down and out off the top 100 ranking, he was one of the best despite out out shape mentally and physically.

picture him winning wimbledon, not in his best shape!!!

he hit a like a billion tennis balls as a kid and it was natural for him to return the ball. no thinking involved.

short, sweet compact swing that involves good hand - eye coordination with good body rotation. also have good wheels (not fast) but got himself into postion most of the time to whack the ball with good hands.
ball striking was like breathing for him, very natural.

FH2FH
02-16-2007, 07:19 AM
I watched the '06 Nadal match at Wimbledon last night. His mobility seemed poor even before last year, but his "ball striking" ability was still so clean. The strokes were so simple and repetitive. He wasn't hitting open stance as much as I thought, but he still did it like all the videos I've seen; advocating the outside leg on the run. That is a key for todays baseliners.

BeckerFan
02-21-2007, 10:58 AM
Agassi was the greatest natural ballstriker I've seen. He had remarkable eyesight and perfect timing. You can practice your swing mechanics all you want, work out as hard as you can, and have an overpowering will to win, but you have to be born with these two fundamental gifts. Agassi was one of the few great players for whom movement was not a key to his success. He was a child prodigy, something like the Tiger Woods of tennis. I don't know any other modern player who hit the ball so cleanly.