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metsjets
03-07-2007, 03:03 PM
i notice that the longer the practice (and the longer i stand), the more my legs and back hurt. are my shoes worn? i have barricade 4s and they're a year old. i don't remember my legs hurting before, so i'm assuming my body is fine.

Fred The Red
03-07-2007, 11:29 PM
It can be anything and i'm not a doctor...

but if you play several hours a week then i suggest that you
buy new shoes every year.

metsjets
03-08-2007, 02:00 PM
yea they're a year old. i was just wondering if many others have the same issue. i guess i'll get a new pair then. is 1 year long enough?

Fossika
03-08-2007, 02:12 PM
i notice that the longer the practice (and the longer i stand), the more my legs and back hurt. are my shoes worn? i have barricade 4s and they're a year old. i don't remember my legs hurting before, so i'm assuming my body is fine.

My feet and back get sore a bit too, just from using them IMO. Maybe try some more cushioned shoes though, I think my back is stuffed from spazzo serves, is your serv motion particularly tough on your back?

fgs
03-08-2007, 05:53 PM
metsjets,
how often do you play and for how long each session? what surface are you playing on?
a year could be enough for those shoes to be worn out, not so much by appearance but by performance (i.e. dampening).
try a new pair and if you're still going to hurt see a doctor.

volusiano
03-08-2007, 09:55 PM
So how do you know when you need new shoes? See how worn out the sole is? How worn out is enough? Wait until a problem develop, like when your feet or legs or back hurt? How do you know it's because of the shoes and not something else? Or just change it after so many hours of play?

Sometimes the old shoes feel comfortable and broken in and you don't like to have to buy stiff new shoes that you must break in again...

fgs
03-09-2007, 03:07 AM
volusiano,
shoes, like most things in life, have a designed time span of optimum performance. now, the sole might still look good, but one of the most important characteristics about shoes is dampening vibrations. for this purpose you have different materials inserted to the soles at different places (i don't go into the tech supported by manufacturers). now, these inserts, whatever they're made of, dampen your 70kg (or whatever weight) on every step, mainly by compression (don't go into physics here, it's not the issue). with time, every material will show signs of fatigue - so compression ratio and hence dampening effect will decrease. than it's time for new shoes.
frequent joggers i have seen are advised to change their running shoes every three months. i can't tell what would be appropriate for tennis, it depends on how much you play, how often you play (materials can fatigue also by just staying around), what kind of surface you're playing on, etc.
there is a major risk of injuries if you wear the wrong shoes - and i'm talking long term injuries as overuse injuries. i have developed a lower back problem i feel now due to (amongst others) running with wrong shoes (clay shoes) on concrete. at that time i didn't feel anything and told myself i'd better get some better strings than a pair of adecquate shoes. now i pay the bill, and it's very high. not only do i need very expensive tennis shoes, but my mobility is quite affected and this is no fun.
i say that there are three important issues in tennis - the racquet, the string, and the shoes. the rest is show.

oscar_2424
03-09-2007, 07:14 AM
i notice that the longer the practice (and the longer i stand), the more my legs and back hurt. are my shoes worn? i have barricade 4s and they're a year old. i don't remember my legs hurting before, so i'm assuming my body is fine.

Talk to Andres Guazzelli, he knows a lot about legs.:-D

cghipp
03-09-2007, 07:30 AM
It may just be that those aren't the shoes for you. You might need something that absorbs a little more shock, or that suits your arch better. I have had problems with lef pain before. I can hardly stand to even go shopping, because my legs will kill me from all the standing around, and it used to be that I would feel the same way while playing tennis. I tried the Prince T9 Roadsters and voila, no more pain. But this isn't a shoe that would be primarily describes as a comfort shoe. So I really believe that, though it's expensive, you need to try some different brands to find the right ones, not just for your feet, but for your body as well.

I also agree with some of the other posters that the materials in your shoe could be fatigued, and might not be giving you the same amount of shock absorption as they once did. If you can't spring for new shoes right now, try replacing the insoles with new shock-absorbing ones. It won't be as good as new shoes, but it might help.

Blade0324
03-09-2007, 08:14 AM
I'm with others here about the shoes shock absorbtion possibly being worn out. If you think that could be the case an inexpensive way to test it out would be to get a quality insert for your current shoes that has good cushioning and see if that helps. If it does then you know it's time for new shoes. Just a thought.

dubsplayer
03-09-2007, 09:11 AM
When my legs start aching after I play I know it's time to buy new shoes. Also if I start to slip on court. I play twice a week and usually need new shoes every 6 to 8 months.

Bottle Rocket
03-09-2007, 10:00 AM
Let me take a different approach...

You need good shoes, we know that. Get good shoes, but...

You also need to get in better shape!

fgs
03-09-2007, 10:15 AM
bottle rocket,
you're right, a tennis player needs good shoes, no matter what level. basically i assume the barricades IV are good shoes, but they might not fit metsjets in matters such as arch support, width etc.
getting in shape is also something to be looking after, but even if you are in good shape you can still get problems from a mismatched shoe, therefore shoe selection is an important but often overlooked issue in tennis.

dr_punk
03-09-2007, 11:25 AM
see a doctor... nothings wrong?
then buy new shoes
the end!

fuzz nation
03-09-2007, 04:57 PM
I've put tendonitis in the rearview mirror with shock absorbing inserts in my sneaks - most stock set-ups aren't spectacular at handling shock, so sampling some inserts in your shoes that are already broken in to your feet isn't unreasonable.

If I ride a bike twice a week for maybe 30-40 minutes, my legs are in substantially better upkeep. No heavy intensity necessary and it's as if all the demons below my waist just evaporate, even if I'm playing every day.