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Chicane
03-18-2007, 01:33 AM
The incident took place two months ago and it still haunts me every time I think about it. It’s about time to get it off my chest.

I played in the first round of a local tournament. I played against this guy who, at first, seemed to be a nice guy. We had a casual chat when we were waiting for our match and everything seemed to be fine. It turned out that referee ran out of scoring cards and the tournament director wanted us to “keep track of our scores.” Bad idea.

I started the match with a bang. I was feeling the ball really well because I trained hard during the winter break. I held my serves and quickly got a break and went up to 5-2. After I won my service game, I said “five games to two.” He nodded.

We sat down at the changeover and I gave him the balls, since it was his turn to serve.

“The score is 5-2, your turn to serve,” I said.

“No, man, the score is 5-4. You won the previous service game and we are on serve,” he said.

I was stunned by his remark. I thought he was kidding. I gave him a quick smile and I explained to him that I broke him during his second service game. He said he held all of his service games.

I started to get annoyed. Rather than thinking about the match, I was trying really hard to explain that there was no way the score was 5-4. We argued for about ten minutes and we could not come to an agreement, so I called the referee.

I offered to draw out the scenarios--to prove that my argument was correct. Whatever I said, my opponent would not agree with me. We could not even agree the side of the court that we started on. It’s pathetic.

The ref said that since no one witnessed our match, there was no way to prove my argument. We had to start the match from the beginning.

We did get our score card when we restarted the match, but I could not contain my anger and disappointment. I lost my mind and the desire to compete. My hand was trembling and I was making a ton of errors. I lost a close first set and he quickly cleaned me out on the second set.

What would you have done? Would you have accepted the score (5-4) and kept on playing the match? Believe me, I tried my best to stay calm when we had to replay our match, but it is really hard to stay poised when all I wanted to do is hop over the net and smash his head with my racket. Come on, buddy… do you really want to win that badly?

tennisee
03-18-2007, 02:36 AM
Hi Chicane - that is a bad scenario, and I have not encountered anything as blatant as that. But sitting here at the computer with a slight tear in the quadriceps that I picked up yesterday something comes to mind;
I had been holding serve easily; mostly unreturnables, but then I went for a big lunge to get a ball and did some damage, and when I served with a bit of pain in the leg I think I sort of used it as an excuse; "Oh, my leg is hurting - it's therefore OK if I dont hold serve," Whereas the injury was minor - there was no reason (in fact more reason - shorten the points) not to serve well.
The guy I was playing was a nice guy and a good sport; perhaps some of his line calls may have been wrong, but that was not of concern to me. Interestingly, when I went to refill my water bottle between sets one of the guys from my club drew me aside and said in very serious tones that he and the others on the court adjacent were sure this guy was hooking me on line calls on the baseline.
I paid it no mind - How would they know? - whereas at the start of the season I remeber being incensed at bad line calls on my serve - and again, using that as an excuse; "how can I hold serve if all my close balls are called out?" And this made me think; I've done best when I've just focussed on my own game - the opponent is one of the conditions.
It's a windy day. The bounces are bad today (I play in a grass comp). The sun is harder for a lefty from this end. This guy calls every close ball out. (escalate this in your case to - the guy is an out-and-out looney). I know it's a stretch, but I'm doing better now by just focussing on what I can do; the next point, etc.
It's much easier to write about than do, and in a couple of weeks we're down to play the team who has a guy with a rep for going off the handle and losing the plot, so I'll see if I can remain sanctimonious if I have to deal with that.
All the best.

J011yroger
03-18-2007, 05:36 AM
I had a similar experience last month.

Lost, guy said he had the flu last week, so re-scheduled his semi to this week, and put me off a week, played his semi, and tried to get the match rescheduled to yesterday, after they had told me it would be sunday at 7. I didn't get the msg. Called this am, and found that they had moved up the time to 6:30. I couldn't get time to warm up at any nearby club, so I showed up 40 mins early to crazy glue my ripped blisters shut (which didn't work btw). Hung out in the players lounge, BSed with everyone, talked to some parents about their juniors. Guy says he gets out of work at 6:30 and will be over directly after, 10 mins late. No problem I say. He rolls in at 6:48 grabs the can of balls, and heads for the court, fresh from his warm up hit no doubt. He procedes to go through the abbreviated 2 minute warm up, and after I take 3 serves, asks if I am ready. I reply NO. He says, spin the racquet, and calls up. Racquet is down, I elect to recieve (If you have followed my other post you know about my problems getting warmed up, and shoulder injury). He doubles for the first point, I smoke the second return to his backhand, and he puts it in the doubles alley, he S&Vs the next point and wins it, third point I return nicely cross court, and he is early on it, shanks it and puts it into the dubs alley, 15-40 me, long rally, he hits one long, I walk over to change, he calls 30-40, I explain how things were, he insists, I say whatever, he wins the first game, down hill from there.

For the rest of the match, he called the lines fairly as far as I could tell, 2nd set was close, and I was dominant for a 3 game stretch, that had him in a full ball hitting racquet throwing frenzy. At the end, I asked him if he really believed that he won the first game of the first set, and he said yes.

I feel bad for extolling the virtues of all high level players I have ever played against, just a little while ago, but being a finalist in my first open tourney of 07, my second ever, seeing the guy who beat me, who didn't scare me, knowing how much I still have left to improve, knowing that I took 6 years off from tennis from age 17-23, 99-05, and knowing that every week I keep getting better, I know that I will be able to dominate at this level...it is just gonna take time and hard work...fortunately I am not afraid of hard work.

J

P.S. for all of you pro wannabes reading this, bear in mind that it will be a miracle if I ever get an ATP point before I die.

P.P.S If this match was on a hard court I would have won 3 & 2 (Or maybe not, but ya gotta believe right?)

J

NoBadMojo
03-18-2007, 06:51 AM
That's really blatant especially since you are sure and can reconstruct the games.....after getting no help from the tourney ref, i would have just declared the guy as defaulted and i wouldnt have replayed the match, and then i would have just sat back and watch the thing play out..there's just no excuse for this, and it's only a local tourney..who needs something like that?...the ends some people go to to try and win amaze me.....iv'e seen lots playing events at all kinds of levels...a fist fight on court, a guy who cornered his doubles partner into the fence and head butted him, stalling, showing up late always, pulling out balls which have never been used but were opened maybe 2 months ago, not giving a decent warmup on purpose, etc
to be safe, it's always a good idea to announce the score at least at the end of every game.

J011yroger
03-18-2007, 07:58 AM
Usually they have those thingys on the net posts that you put balls in, or flip cards. Well the tourney I played this weekend didn't, but most places do.

J

goober
03-18-2007, 08:02 AM
I am encountering really terrible behavior at tournaments lately and it is really depressing. In the OP situation I am not sure what I would have done. If the ref didn't help you at all and you refused to continue then you would have been defaulted. If you were playing really well I may have taken the 5-4 score and since you probably would have won the first set.

I recently lost a close tourney match against a guy who always hooked on game points. He was always messing up the score in his favor both in games and in total games. By the end of the match I didn't even care any more about the outcome I just wanted to get out of there.

J011yroger
03-18-2007, 08:13 AM
There are so many great players, and good people at tournaments, and all it takes is one looser to ruin it. I can't tell you how many people I have met at tourneys, and after the match I say "Hey man, you play great, lets hit sometime" and give him my e-mail.

J

Sakkijarvi
03-18-2007, 11:19 AM
Too bad you ran into a jerk, it's just a match and we all have bad ones in the rearview.

And that's where it belongs, in the rearview.

Your post is a good reminder to keep score using the ball post as one goes along, at least in a tourney setting. Thanks for the heads up.

Sakki

beernutz
03-18-2007, 11:45 AM
Here is what The Code says you should have done:
32. Disputes. Disputes over the score shall be resolved by using one of
the following methods, which are listed in the order of preference:
• count all points and games agreed upon by the players and
replay only the disputed points or games;
• play from a score mutually agreeable to all players;
• spin a racket or toss a coin.

So if you could not agree on a score using either of the first two bullet points you should have at least flipped a coin or spun a racquet to decide between it being 5-2 or 5-4. I would have stuck to my guns and at least have gotten a 50% chance to use the 'correct' score using a coin flip.

Sorry you ran into a jerk. Was he one of those players who also refuses to call out the game score at the beginning of a game?

I do have to question whether you had the score right however, since you said you had held all your serves and had broken him once and the score was 5-2. However, for that scenario to have been correct, you would have had to have broken him twice.

LoveThisGame
03-18-2007, 12:58 PM
It seems, as I've found out too, that one has to call out after EVERY point and game, LOUD and CLEAR, what the score is, whether you are serving or not.

Sometimes it's not spoken every time, sometimes spoken too low. Sometimes folks forget the score and the opponents are unaware until crisis time.

Speak loud; shout to some degree.

Repeat the set and match score on changeovers. Don't chat on changeovers of a match. Why? The score is forgotten. ALSO, that's a gamesmanship tactic to get your mind off the match and for you to lose your momentum. Simple questions: "Where are you from? Where do you work? Weren't you a teacher? (I learned my lesson after losing a match despite being in utter control.) (Hopefully, I'm reaching the potential victims and not the protagonists!)

dcottrill
03-18-2007, 01:23 PM
As I get older and my Mad Cow disease gets worse, I find that I will occasionally forget the score. So, I clip one of these on a wristband to keep track of the score during a match. In addition to helping me keep track of how badly I'm losing, it seems to cut way down on disputes.

www.scoreitsports.com/tennis.asp

Pro Staff Pete
03-18-2007, 02:49 PM
You guys don't have scoreboards like this?

http://www.t ennisplanet.com/images/photos240/TVT829.jpg

(remove space)

tennismike33
03-18-2007, 04:54 PM
If you play in tournaments there are a variety of "things" that can happen.

1. Bad calls, this happens at EVERY level.

2. Score disputes. This happens more at the Jr level than at adult tournaments.

3. Playing against the meanist person you have ever met.

4. Playing against the best player you have ever played against.

5. Playing against the worst player you have ever played against.

1. Bad calls happen, you can either accept them, challenge the call made by the player, request a line judge. If no line judge is available, wait for another group to finish and ask for someone to monitor line calls. If they don't want to or are unwilling to help, forefit the match or play even harder so that at the end of the match you can ask the person if cheating a few calls was worth it???

2. It has been posted what you can do, the best thing to do is yell out the score and make sure the other player is familiar with what you think the score is.

3. Screw them, they are mean all the time.

4. Challenge yourself, keep the ball in play as much as you can.

5. Beat the pants off of them, don't look back, don't work on something, just win.

spiderman123
03-19-2007, 06:35 AM
I do have to question whether you had the score right however, since you said you had held all your serves and had broken him once and the score was 5-2. However, for that scenario to have been correct, you would have had to have broken him twice.

Op: Original Poster JO: jerk opponent

Server Winner Score(OP-JO)
------ ------- ------
OP OP 1-0
JO JO 1-1
OP OP 2-1
JO JO 2-2
OP OP 3-2
JO OP 4-2(BREAK)
OP OP 5-2

Change with 5-2 with one break.


For the record, if I had to play the match again, I would have walked out saying I cannot play against cheats. You said you were trembling with anger, that is bad. If you are not in a position to play calmly, walk out and give vent to your anger by talking to a friend/teammate etc. That much anger is not worth any money or any match. And if you walked out (when you were ahead 5-4 or 5-2) people would have little doubt on who the cheat was.

beernutz
03-19-2007, 07:00 AM
Op: Original Poster JO: jerk opponent

Server Winner Score(OP-JO)
------ ------- ------
OP OP 1-0
JO JO 1-1
OP OP 2-1
JO JO 2-2
OP OP 3-2
JO OP 4-2(BREAK)
OP OP 5-2

Change with 5-2 with one break.


For the record, if I had to play the match again, I would have walked out saying I cannot play against cheats. You said you were trembling with anger, that is bad. If you are not in a position to play calmly, walk out and give vent to your anger by talking to a friend/teammate etc. That much anger is not worth any money or any match. And if you walked out (when you were ahead 5-4 or 5-2) people would have little doubt on who the cheat was.

My bad, OP's account of the set was correct. Thanks for the correction.

larlarbd
03-19-2007, 07:27 AM
The incident took place two months ago and it still haunts me every time I think about it. It’s about time to get it off my chest.

I played in the first round of a local tournament. I played against this guy who, at first, seemed to be a nice guy. We had a casual chat when we were waiting for our match and everything seemed to be fine. It turned out that referee ran out of scoring cards and the tournament director wanted us to “keep track of our scores.” Bad idea.

I started the match with a bang. I was feeling the ball really well because I trained hard during the winter break. I held my serves and quickly got a break and went up to 5-2. After I won my service game, I said “five games to two.” He nodded.

We sat down at the changeover and I gave him the balls, since it was his turn to serve.

“The score is 5-2, your turn to serve,” I said.

“No, man, the score is 5-4. You won the previous service game and we are on serve,” he said.

I was stunned by his remark. I thought he was kidding. I gave him a quick smile and I explained to him that I broke him during his second service game. He said he held all of his service games.

I started to get annoyed. Rather than thinking about the match, I was trying really hard to explain that there was no way the score was 5-4. We argued for about ten minutes and we could not come to an agreement, so I called the referee.

I offered to draw out the scenarios--to prove that my argument was correct. Whatever I said, my opponent would not agree with me. We could not even agree the side of the court that we started on. It’s pathetic.

The ref said that since no one witnessed our match, there was no way to prove my argument. We had to start the match from the beginning.

We did get our score card when we restarted the match, but I could not contain my anger and disappointment. I lost my mind and the desire to compete. My hand was trembling and I was making a ton of errors. I lost a close first set and he quickly cleaned me out on the second set.

What would you have done? Would you have accepted the score (5-4) and kept on playing the match? Believe me, I tried my best to stay calm when we had to replay our match, but it is really hard to stay poised when all I wanted to do is hop over the net and smash his head with my racket. Come on, buddy… do you really want to win that badly?

Oye Man , I feel ya . Same kinda thing happened to me once . Me & my opponent did call the referee & What I did was I let him explain the score & breaks - then when he was finished , I asked him If he started the serve & as he was saying no breaks , then how come I'm serving & He is on that side of the net , Then I calmly counted infront of the referee & proved him wrong . He had nothing to say .

Now , If your op said it was 5-4 instead of 5-2 , it's a bit difficult caz counting ain't gonna prove him wrong - only sides will , but I'm pretty sure he must've lied abt that by then - so , what do ya do ? My best suggestion is - You act as you are to walk-off the courts in-protest ( in that way You give yourself time to calmdown more ) - then the referee tries one last time to talk you through , you say you ain't gonna play against cheats ( YOU MAKE IT 100% CLEAR that the guy on the otherside is indeed a CHEAT ) - then You shake your head & say to yourself & everyone else around you THE ONLY WAY TO SHOW A CHEAT HIS PLACE IS TO MAKE HIM A LOSER HE IS - be that by playing it one more time , You use your negative energy as positive energy , You were 5-2 ( lead & in a winning position = eventual win ) - NO REASON WHY YOU CAN'T beat him again . If that's the attitude - win or lose you make a statement. That's how I w'd have done - One more thing , I'm just not gonna make some loser getaway with cheating against me - I'd have dragged this agenda foe a long time until that guy had a pretty bad rep abt him as a cheater . MAKE YOURSELF HEARD - if he did it with ya & got away , he's probably gonna try to pull this off again , don let him. ALWAYS REMEMBER , A CHEATER = A LOSER ( he knows he can't beat u fair , so he goes to those low lengths ).

onehandbh
03-19-2007, 09:21 AM
Yikes! Just after reading about the craziness you faced, faced my own
interesting situation last night playing a set of doubles. We decided to
pick teams randomly by just spinning racquets (up or down). Anyways,
somehow the two baseliners with good groundstrokes but weaker
serves got pared together. My partner and I were up 5-3 I think and
then the other two started arguing. It eventually escalated to the point
where they started yelling each other and then one of them, which for
the purposes of the story will I refer to as Mr. A(nnoyed), decided he
had had enough and quit. As he walked off the court, he was
yelling all kinds of sh#t and loudly muttering insults at his partner. His
partner, who I'll call Mr. C(onfrontation) took exception and followed him
and engaged in a little verbal sparring. Instead of backing down, the Mr. A
decides to throw in some more choice words back. By now they are
at the net post and right up in each other's faces. Some threats of actual
fisticuffs are now taking place. If I were a betting man, I'd say that Mr. C,
who is quite the physical specimen vs. Mr. A (who has decent cardio
conditioning from playing tennis 2-3x *PER* day every day but still carries
kangaroo pouch would still lose a fight to a pre-pubescent Andy Dick),
would give Mr. A quite the beatdown and a quick call 911 would be in
order if an actual duel were to take place. Meanwhile Mr. A has not backed
down one bit w/his verbal barrage.

At this point, my doubles partner (all 5'7", 145 lbs of him) and I run
over to physically get between them and prevent any carnage.
Fortunately, red asphalt was avoided. Needless to say, Mr. A and Mr. C
will not playing together or against each other any time soon in the near
future.

Just another day at the public park courts...

norcal
03-19-2007, 01:54 PM
Great stories. My intro to tournie cheats was when I was playing a guy with a rep for hooking. I was beating him pretty handily so I didn't really care about his calls. I was up a set and 5-2 or something like that and he says to me,

"You are calling all my close shots out! Every time I hit the line you call it out!"

I was taken aback. I told him no, maybe you're having eye problems. I asked my brother and some friends who were watching if they thought I blew any calls and they said no, if anything he was making bad calls.

So on the very next point I hit an overhead IN THE MIDDLE OF HIS COURT for a winner. He calls it out. I couldn't believe it. He said "Payback's a beeyotch, huh?"

I won the match in minute later and someone who knew the guy came up to me and said, "don't worry about that guy, he is a psychologist and was just trying to mess with your head.

Turns out he is a well known psychologist and author - he writes books on setting limits on kids. We are friends now only because I am a much better player so I didn't have to deal with him on a tennis basis.

mellofelow
03-19-2007, 10:09 PM
Wooohhhh.... wait a minute!!! Chicane, did you both change ends on odd games? If so, the score is 5-2 if you start the next point on the same end as you started the match.

Otherwise, the score is 5-4 if you start the point on the opposite end as you started the match.

I read that you both could not agree on the sides but I find that hard to believe. Since he started the match serving, didn't you pick sides? If so, then the ref has to take your word for it.

mellofelow
03-19-2007, 10:18 PM
dup post...

kingdaddy41788
03-19-2007, 10:34 PM
So many crazies out there. I mean, I'm definitely a player that has been known to have a bit of a temper (I make safin look like a cute little puppy sometimes), but I'd never cheat. Such a shame to hear about these things happening, but I suppose it's inevitable. Not much you can do but be mentally tough and deal with it. I've been trying and slowly but surely am getting better. It's a long process though.

tennisee
03-20-2007, 01:34 AM
Actually - I seem to forget the score quite a bit and need to ask for confirmation; I think I've disagreed with my opponent two or three times this season, but in each case my opponent was giving me more games that I thought I deserved!

I had a misunderstanding when I replayed a point with a bloke (let after ball rolling onto the court). I served again, and thought it was a just a little bit long, but he just walked to the other side, so I started the new point without calling the score. That was my mistake - he thought that when you played a let you played it from the second serve if the original first serve was a fault, so he thought I lost the point, whereas I thought I had won it. We talked about it and I gave him the point because I thought I was at fault for not clarifying by calling out before I served. At the time I thought it was a bit rude for me to call such an obvious score, but it just goes to show you can't be too obvious.

The bloke I played last weekend thought the same thing; (and he'd been playing comp for 18 yrs) He called a ball loudly "on the line!" which I heard as "wide" (why do you call it if it's in?) so I just caught his return, and he offerd to play a let (his serve) and then he said, "now, am I serving a first or second serve?" I told him he had two serves.

vllockhart
03-21-2007, 12:29 PM
All I can say is to write down the score after every game, even if it's annoying to do so. I've been cheated several times. In my first USTA match, we opened up very tight. She called all of my close balls out. So I called a couple of hers out. In fact, I called one out that was clearly in. Then she stopped calling mine out.

It's a shame that some people actually think they won when they cheated. I can look at all of my trophies (none in tennis yet) and feel good because I know I won them fair and square. I wonder how the cheaters feel when they go home. You can't be celebrating the way non cheaters do.

kevhen
03-22-2007, 12:14 PM
That sounds really bad, him hooking you two full games! I would go back to the beginning to recall what side you started on. Since you couldn't agree on that, then I would likely stop playing against this guy and talk to an official about possibly defaulting both of you and ending this charade for him.

If you are allowed a coin flip over the score, you could take that, but any further cheating would cause me to stop play permanently with this guy.

When did you break this guy? Can you remember what the game score was? Did you go up 2-0 or was it at 3-1 or 4-2? Always announce game score before serving. If you said the score was 4-2 before you started serving the last game and he didn't dispute it then the 5-2 score should hold.

Do you remember the last point of the game that you broke this guy?

Clive Walker
03-23-2007, 12:48 PM
This is a slightly side issue but one of the things that grates me especially is when an opponent takes a flap at a serve that is clearly long, the ball drops just over the net and as I am setting up for my second serve he says "the serve was in." & then claims the point.

This wouldn't be an issue if people called every serve out that is out, but they don't. It also annoys me when I serve what feels like a good serve, which isn't called out, then when I put away a volley and move to take the next serve they point me to the previous side and say "2nd serve."

Bad calls are inevitable at times, and don't annoy me at all. -The harsher an opponent calls lines, the harsher I call lines. THe big annoyance I find is a lack of clarity.

beernutz
03-23-2007, 02:59 PM
This is a slightly side issue but one of the things that grates me especially is when an opponent takes a flap at a serve that is clearly long, the ball drops just over the net and as I am setting up for my second serve he says "the serve was in." & then claims the point.

This wouldn't be an issue if people called every serve out that is out, but they don't. It also annoys me when I serve what feels like a good serve, which isn't called out, then when I put away a volley and move to take the next serve they point me to the previous side and say "2nd serve."

Bad calls are inevitable at times, and don't annoy me at all. -The harsher an opponent calls lines, the harsher I call lines. THe big annoyance I find is a lack of clarity.

It is up to you to get your opponent to play by the rules. In your first example, it is perfectly acceptable for an opponent to "take a flap at a serve that is clearly long" since you don't get to make first service calls on their side of the court.

However, they can't have it both ways. In your second example, if somebody tried that delayed 'your serve was out' tactic on me I'd raise cain until they see that I'm not going to put up with it. Nip it in the bud as Barney used to say. All they have to do is raise a finger. How hard is that?

Chicane
03-24-2007, 10:36 AM
sigh... i just lost another match an hour ago, but this time fare and square. the guy was firing winners left and right from the start. tennis ain't easy...

J011yroger
03-25-2007, 10:48 AM
You aren't bluffin on that one. Yesterday I asked the guy on the next court over why we couldn't have picked an easy sport. Like running. I could have been a 100yd dash guy, give it hell, and be in the shower in 14 seconds.

J

goober
03-25-2007, 11:31 AM
You aren't bluffin on that one. Yesterday I asked the guy on the next court over why we couldn't have picked an easy sport. Like running. I could have been a 100yd dash guy, give it hell, and be in the shower in 14 seconds.

J

LOL :D

The problem is if you are a sprinter running a 100 yards in 14 seconds you would be in last place in every meet you entered unless maybe you were running against 70 year olds in the Senior olympics.

As for for long distance running which is much more common among amateurs I am not sure if it is easier. Technically it mught be less demanding, but the training regimens are more gruelling and require incredible self motiviation if you are going to be competitive in races.

J011yroger
03-25-2007, 02:49 PM
Hey man, running needs its 2.5 players too!

J

rrhstennis
03-25-2007, 07:58 PM
You aren't bluffin on that one. Yesterday I asked the guy on the next court over why we couldn't have picked an easy sport. Like running. I could have been a 100yd dash guy, give it hell, and be in the shower in 14 seconds.

J

Sorry but tennis is the easy sport compared to running. :) I did Cross Country for years and I've never felt as tired after 4 hours of tennis as I did after a single 20 minute cross country race.

J011yroger
03-25-2007, 08:58 PM
I ran XC in highschool. But I liked being on the team with the guys and goin on the trips and running in cool places. I was certainly not good at it. Ran track in the spring while I was in middleschool, but when I got to HS we had tennis (something I actually was good at).

When I was talking about easy, I meant as far as required skill/learning.

At most when I ran I would run 35 miles a week or so, and I was no where near as physically/mentally exhausted not to mention hurt and beat up as I am when I am playing 20+ hours a week.

I guess everything is relative. The sunday jogger doesn't get as tired or put forth as much effort as the D1 miler.

And tennis players as you go up the NTRP ladder play progressively harder.

Know what would be cool? Seeing the avg amount of calories burned per hour per NTRP level. I bet it about doubles per full point.

J

J

rrhstennis
03-26-2007, 12:18 PM
I ran XC in highschool. But I liked being on the team with the guys and goin on the trips and running in cool places. I was certainly not good at it. Ran track in the spring while I was in middleschool, but when I got to HS we had tennis (something I actually was good at).

When I was talking about easy, I meant as far as required skill/learning.

At most when I ran I would run 35 miles a week or so, and I was no where near as physically/mentally exhausted not to mention hurt and beat up as I am when I am playing 20+ hours a week.

I guess everything is relative. The sunday jogger doesn't get as tired or put forth as much effort as the D1 miler.

And tennis players as you go up the NTRP ladder play progressively harder.

Know what would be cool? Seeing the avg amount of calories burned per hour per NTRP level. I bet it about doubles per full point.

J

J

True dat. I think the main reason I had so much effort required from me in XC was because I'm 6'4" and 225 lbs. I mean, I'm a big guy. Running is definitely not what I'm built for but I slugged through it. As for tennis, I imagine the amount of calories burned goes up a ton. You have to account for weight as well but the NTRP alone should increase it a lot!

JRstriker12
03-26-2007, 12:49 PM
Great stories. My intro to tournie cheats was when I was playing a guy with a rep for hooking. I was beating him pretty handily so I didn't really care about his calls. I was up a set and 5-2 or something like that and he says to me,

"You are calling all my close shots out! Every time I hit the line you call it out!"

I was taken aback. I told him no, maybe you're having eye problems. I asked my brother and some friends who were watching if they thought I blew any calls and they said no, if anything he was making bad calls.

So on the very next point I hit an overhead IN THE MIDDLE OF HIS COURT for a winner. He calls it out. I couldn't believe it. He said "Payback's a beeyotch, huh?"

I won the match in minute later and someone who knew the guy came up to me and said, "don't worry about that guy, he is a psychologist and was just trying to mess with your head.

Turns out he is a well known psychologist and author - he writes books on setting limits on kids. We are friends now only because I am a much better player so I didn't have to deal with him on a tennis basis.

Whoa, can he really call that out if the ball was in the middle of the court? What are the rules on that sort iof cheat.

He must be a nice guy outside tennis because I couldn't be friends with a guy like that.

tennis_hand
03-28-2007, 09:46 PM
probably you should just write down the score somewhere, just in case for disputes when someone forgets the score. Playing people without honesty is not fun, esp. we don't make a living out of the games.

bleach
03-29-2007, 10:35 AM
I was playing in a tourney (doubles) once and we were calling out the score after each game. The last time the score was called out was 5-4 (with me serving to win the 3rd set/match). I held my serve to win the match. Our opponents were a father & son team. After I stated that the match was over, the Father started to disagree. At first the son agreed that it was 6-4, but after being talked to by his Father, he took the Father's side to it being 4-2.

I remembered each game and pointed it out, again (at first) the son agreed, but was talked down by his Father. When the ref was called over, I tried to point out that the son had "changed his story twice" and that should be the deciding factor. But the ref/director was good friends with the Father and we had to go to 4-2 because it was the last score we all could agree to.

We were so angry, that we lost quickly from there. A couple of weeks later, I ran into them again. The Father came up to me to say no hard feelings (and of course I was wrong). I asked him to ask his son (not tell him) what the true score was. The son confirmed we were correct. He said he was sorry and wanted to give us a rematch (like that would mean anything). I told him, no thanks, I feel we already won the first one!

Pr0DiGy
03-29-2007, 12:00 PM
Put yourself in his shoes.

He could have just as well truly believe the score was 5-4--and that you were the one cheating

Personally, I believe you--you said he agreed the score was 5-2.