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polakosaur
09-10-2004, 12:02 PM
I have really great vision 20/20. I usually play during the day and i'm real good. i occasionally play at night under the lights. yesterday i was playing at night and i sucked. I played nothing compared to when i play during the day. The reason why i think this happened was due to not enough light and i couldn't track the ball. I was having so much trouble tracking it and then seeing the contact. Shanking balls, hiting long, and missing easy volleys that i make almost 100% of the time. Does this happen to anyone else? I'm just gonna keep practicing to improve my vision and tracking of the ball under the lights.

Any feedback

BillH
09-10-2004, 02:02 PM
I too have this problem and I think it is a matter of letting your eyes adjust to court lighting. I noticed recently when I warmed up for a match indoors (bright light) and then moved outdoors to play match (much dimmer court lights) that I couldn't track the ball. During the Spring, Summer and Fall, I play almost exclusively outside and I notice that if I start playing while it is still light outside and allow my eyes to slowly adjust to the dimming light before dusk and before we turn the court lights on, my vision is much better. The quality of the court lights also makes a big difference. I play at two clubs in my town - one has good lighting, the other sucks. Its merely a matter of getting used to the lighting.

Camilio Pascual
09-10-2004, 03:03 PM
Baseball tip: Avoid looking at the lights at all times and wear a hat with a bill.

thehustler
09-10-2004, 11:17 PM
I find that I play better at night rather than the day. I don't have to deal with the sun or the heat, and at the courts I play at I know where all the lights are and how to avoid looking at them on serve. But like it was said above some of the lights are bad quality and some are great and that you just need to get used to the lighting. The worst ones are where the lights turn off automatically after a set amount of time. Really annoying. Why those exist are beyond me.

10s4all
09-10-2004, 11:29 PM
The problem with playing in lower lite is that our eyes need a great deal of lite to see well. Cats and certain owls have much more sensitive eyes in the dark. The reason you miss balls that you normally wouldn't during the day is because with less light, we lose depth perception. Depth perception is what lets you know where the ball is as its coming toward you.

One thing you can do to make up for darker conditions is get ready sooner. This allows you to make last minute changes.

One thing to remember about tennis is that whatever problem you are having, your opponent is also. If you can't see, neither can your opponent. :) :lol: :D

gregraven
09-11-2004, 06:10 AM
I have really great vision 20/20. I usually play during the day and i'm real good. i occasionally play at night under the lights. yesterday i was playing at night and i sucked. I played nothing compared to when i play during the day. The reason why i think this happened was due to not enough light and i couldn't track the ball. I was having so much trouble tracking it and then seeing the contact. Shanking balls, hiting long, and missing easy volleys that i make almost 100% of the time. Does this happen to anyone else? I'm just gonna keep practicing to improve my vision and tracking of the ball under the lights.

If your vision really is that good, it may be that you don't actually watch the ball during the day, but your peripheral vision has been getting you through. At night, this isn't good enough ... you have to watch the ball. I'd recommend "freezing" after hitting the ball, and then checking to see where your head is pointing, where your eyes are focussed, etc. Check out still photos of Federer hitting groundstrokes, and you'll see what it means to keep your head still through your stroke.

polakosaur
09-11-2004, 06:43 PM
i forgot to put in my original post that the lighting is really poor, thats the difference between day and night you have more light and can see the ball during the day, and at night you kind of lose track of it

gregraven
09-13-2004, 09:57 AM
Unless you have some kind of poor night vision, it sounds to me as if you are not watching the ball -- no matter what the lighting conditions are.

Bungalo Bill
09-13-2004, 10:06 AM
I haved trouble playing at nights as well. Sometimes public courts and even private courts do not setup the lights properly for tennis.

I also noticed that I can not keep focus on the ball as well at night as I see a shadow around the ball as it is traveling through the air. I have trouble judging the speed of the incoming ball as well. Needless to say, I avoid playing at night.

I know a lot of this is atributed to my age. As we get older the eyes ability to maintain focus diminishes. In other words, while you are watching an incoming ball (and you're young) your eyes can move in and out to gain and regain focus on the ball as it is traveling and getting closer. The eye works much like the lens of a camera trying to make those slight adjustments to gain focus on a moving object.

When we get older the eyes lose their ability to do this. The age this starts to become more noticeable is 40 and up!

Also, it has nothing to do with your vision (farsightedness or nearsightedness). When I began to need reading glasses my eyes lost their ability to make those adjustments which is different then your 20/20 vision category. Hopefully if your young it is a lighting problem at your courts.

JohnThomas1
09-14-2004, 04:09 AM
I too have trouble at night. I notice it most on volleys. I am quite a decent volleyer now but at night i am constantly feeling for the ball and find my timing is well out. I think the volley has a small timing window and this is why it is the stroke most affected for me at night. One of my partners, who is a sensational volleyer volleys like absolute crap at night. In the daytime he is unsurpassed.

polakosaur
09-15-2004, 01:01 PM
if we only played on courts that are lighted like the us open

gregraven
09-15-2004, 01:04 PM
... with someone else paying the electric bills.

Chanchai
09-15-2004, 02:21 PM
Like theHustler, I have a better time playing at night than at day. Don't know if that goes hand in hand with both of us being from Oregon (and maybe theHustler plays indoors as much as I do--but I try to force myself to play outdoors when the weather is good--so different).

I think I prefer the conditions at night much more. The ball feels like its travel is very solid at night and I am just more confident with cleaner contact at night. Perhaps some of the parks I am playing at don't have adequate background block (colored windscreens) and so maybe I'm just succumbing to an open court in the day with kids and cars moving around in the background.

Inadequate lighting definitely factors in. But even when playing at night with soccer stadium lights (really bad for tennis), I feel fine playing. But it's just not nearly as bad compared to poor lighting in indoor courts, particularly direct lighting where if things aren't just right, you have "blackholes" on the court (which SUCK bigtime), or lights blazing in your eyes during overheads and serve. Fortunately, most indoor facilities use indirect lighting (mostly flourescent) which is very uniform and complete--if not sorta dim (think of a squash or racquetball facility).

With variance in the sky at daytime, I have trouble reading my ball toss. But I can see where people get a bit lost at night with this, though it feels comfortably uniform to me.

When it comes to playing outdoors... my favorite times to play are very early in the morning (when there's slightly cold air) or at night. The conditions just feel more uniform to me during those periods.

And again, maybe it's just Oregon :P

-Chanchai

Phil
09-15-2004, 07:47 PM
When Borg said that playing under the lights was the reason he never won the USO, I can sympathize with him. I play at least one night session a week, and it's a totally different ball game for me. My overhead is crap-because I have trouble judging the ball and volleying is difficult because I momentarily lose sight of hard hit balls once I'm past the service line. Maybe it's my eyesight or the way the lights are set-up in the particular court in which I play. I don't know for sure, but I'll take blinding sun, scorching heat and tempestuous wind ANY day.

Rickson
09-15-2004, 07:54 PM
I'll take blinding sun, scorching heat and tempestuous wind ANY day.
Whatever floats your boat, Phil.

thehustler
09-15-2004, 11:25 PM
Chanchai -

I think it's the Oregon thing. I never play indoors, unless it's at some tournament. I love the outdoors. I love the cars going by, other people playing, sounds of traffic and so on. I can easily block it all out when I want and use it to my advantage when it distracts my opponent. I really like it when it's winter and about 30 degrees or less out at night. Oh yeah. That makes for some fun play. I always feel I hit better at night. I can see the ball better and feel like I hit cleaner as well. No dealing with the sun or clouds, part of the court being covered in shade, then rushing to net only to step into sun and having your eyes suddenly adjust so you can't see the ball as well. No hot temperatures that can cause a heat stroke or anything like that.

I've noticed around here some courts are lit up well. Lights on the sides and nothing on the back of each end to blind you on your toss. Some however are like that, other lights go out after 45 minutes so you have to wait which is just annoying. The time I most like to play during the day is when it's cloudy or raining. Rain is such a great equalizer. It forces you to work on your strokes better and can help you get a good drop shot going since it's likely your opponent isn't crazy enough to run after the ball. But then again that's me. I guess I've lived here too long to realize playing in the rain is a bad idea. Ahh the joys of living in Oregon.

bcaz
09-15-2004, 11:43 PM
Night play is where it's at in Phoenix. I can't relate to the day people who play at 6 am ... ugh! If you can stand the heat, the brilliant sunshine sure gives you a great look at the ball during the day, which is great. Even so, I learned to play at night, in the summer, so I'm spoiled ... You have less time to see the ball and pick up the spin, but you never have to serve or smash lobs while squinting into the sun.

kevhen
09-16-2004, 06:53 AM
I think older players tend to struggle at night more since the rods in your eyes tend to die off as you age. I know younger players see better than me at night when the lights haven't come on yet and I usually see better than the older guys in the same situation, but I am sure it depends alot on the individual as well. If only we had cat's eyes we could play tennis around the clock.