PDA

View Full Version : How to hit powerful slice backhand?


a529612
09-11-2004, 06:39 PM
My underspin slice backhand is deep and lands usually near the baseline but it has too much float and gives my opponent some extra time to attack. How can I hit powerful and fast slice backhand?

Also, is it bad technique to keep hitting underspin slice backhand instead of taking it flat or with topspin?

Rickson
09-11-2004, 07:19 PM
I usually hit my harder backhands with topspin or flat, but I can hit a pretty hard backspin 1hbh as well. I take an eastern backhand grip and hit the ball pretty hard while pronating my wrist. If you're floating the ball on a slice backhand, you might be using a continental grip so make sure you tilt the racquet more to a true backhand grip and let it rip. As for your last question, yes, don't use the slice backhand all the time as it becomes predictable on your backhand side so learn to hit topspin drives too.

TwistServe
09-11-2004, 08:04 PM
I usually hit my harder backhands with topspin or flat, but I can hit a pretty hard backspin 1hbh as well. I take an eastern backhand grip and hit the ball pretty hard while pronating my wrist. If you're floating the ball on a slice backhand, you might be using a continental grip so make sure you tilt the racquet more to a true backhand grip and let it rip. As for your last question, yes, don't use the slice backhand all the time as it becomes predictable on your backhand side so learn to hit topspin drives too.

Slicing your backhands with an eastern backhand grip won't give you a penatrating slice.. Use the continential grip and get a good shoulder rotation, throw your weight into the stroke.. It'll go deep, have lots of backspin, and penetrate.

Rickson
09-11-2004, 08:18 PM
Hitting a slice backhand with a continental grip won't give you a penetrating slice... A continental grip will cause pop ups and float the ball. Use a true backhand grip.

finchy
09-11-2004, 10:23 PM
you are supposed to keep your wrist steady at all times on the slice and 1hbh, if you use it.

using a wristy slice will hurt your hand and will most likely leave you injured or in alot of pain.

dozu
09-12-2004, 04:26 AM
the "slice" is a misleading term.

if you slice the ball, it will float..... knock the ball with an open racket face, the ball will be penetrating... the underspin is just a by-product.

TwistServe
09-12-2004, 06:42 AM
Hitting a slice backhand with a continental grip won't give you a penetrating slice... A continental grip will cause pop ups and float the ball. Use a true backhand grip.

Nope you just don't understand what a slice is.. or don't understand how do do one properly.. where's BB to clarify?..

A continential grip will not "pop" the ball if done properly.. it'll actually be very penetrating and have plenty of bite, float real low and have a very low bounce.

Look at this url for a slice backhand... You want a 45 degree angle when making contact with the ball. This gives it the underspin. If you're using an eastern backhand grip, you can still achieve this but naturally you're racquet will be more square to the target...

"Raise the racket above the level of the ball on your back swing, and let the racket face open up at about a 45 degree angle. Also, turn your shoulders on your back swing. Then, come through the ball with a swift and sure motion, brushing downward so that the ball has under spin. The exact trajectory of the swing will vary with the height of the ball that has been hit. Your follow through should be an extension of your swing, and will end up lower than a normal backhand follow through. "

http://wywy.essortment.com/tennisslicebac_rytl.htm

Maybe you have issues with your backhand because you been using the same grip for slice and topspins.. Understand the technical difference and why you need two grips, what the angle of the racquet does, and why one grip has an advantage over the other.[/i]

Rickson
09-12-2004, 06:56 AM
There is no exact science to tennis. A slice can be done with a continental, eastern backhand, western backhand, even eastern forehand if you wanted to. With that said, don't go around claiming I don't understand what a slice is or how to execute one properly because your ignorance is sickening.

TwistServe
09-12-2004, 07:03 AM
There is no exact science to tennis. A slice can be done with a continental, eastern backhand, western backhand, even eastern forehand if you wanted to. With that said, don't go around claiming I don't understand what a slice is or how to execute one properly because your ignorance is sickening.

Hey you're the one always complaining about your bad 1hander.. How you just float them over, how you cant hit topspin, etc.. need me to search all your posts? now suddenly you know all about the onehander?

Yes you can do any grip you want, but you want the angle of contact at about 45 degree.. and you want to use the right grip for that. that's why one handers can't suddently change their mind when hitting topspin vs slice or slice vs topspin.. most use different grips.. open your mind up and don't think you know everything.. the continentail might improve your game..

one day i was hittin serves and some old guy corrected a component.. i ignored him thinkin i knew better but sure enough he was right.. the next day i tried it his way and a fixed a big mistake in my stroke.

TwistServe
09-12-2004, 07:10 AM
There is no exact science to tennis. A slice can be done with a continental, eastern backhand, western backhand, even eastern forehand if you wanted to. With that said, don't go around claiming I don't understand what a slice is or how to execute one properly because your ignorance is sickening.

And yes there is a science to tennis... you don't go around hittin forehands with an eastern backhand grip, and you don't go around hitting volleys with a western grip.. you dont hit serves with the racquet up your ***, and you don't do a split step by doing summersault flips..

point being, there is a science to tennis

VTL
09-12-2004, 10:57 AM
You can hit a penetrating bh slice w/ either grip.. nuff said. What's with all these personal attacks anyway?

Chanchai
09-12-2004, 11:00 AM
By some definition out there... isn't an eastern backhand grip the same as a western forehand grip?

But I know what you mean, you don't drive a western grip with your hand on top of the racquet with the ability to point your thumb towards the net.

I disagree with Rickson's statement on the continental grip and slice. It certainly won't pop the ball when done right. And I agree with TwistServe's explanation of the continental grip.

-Chanchai

TwistServe
09-12-2004, 12:25 PM
You can hit a penetrating bh slice w/ either grip.. nuff said. What's with all these personal attacks anyway?

Sorry didn't mean to attack anyone.. just don't like it when someone posts something that i feel is blatantly wrong.

yes either grips can give you a penetrating slice but each grip also has its advantage and disadvantage.... just like you can get topspin with either eastern, sw, or western grips. but to say continental causes floaters and popups, that just got me a little fired up

fastdunn
09-13-2004, 12:08 PM
Get video clips of Ken Rosewell hit his 1 handed backhand slice.

I'm not in a position where I can analyze the greatest slice
backhand of all time (as Sampras said). But if I may try...
He seems to maintain same angle of racquet face thru out
the whole swing path (and even "supinate" a little. some
exaggerted suppination I could spot from the slow motion
video of Graf's slice backhand...., IMHO....)

Bungalo Bill
09-13-2004, 01:44 PM
You can hit a penetrating bh slice w/ either grip.. nuff said. What's with all these personal attacks anyway?

Sorry didn't mean to attack anyone.. just don't like it when someone posts something that i feel is blatantly wrong.

yes either grips can give you a penetrating slice but each grip also has its advantage and disadvantage.... just like you can get topspin with either eastern, sw, or western grips. but to say continental causes floaters and popups, that just got me a little fired up

THe backhand slice can be hit with a continental or an eastern backhand grip.

The popup of the ball is usually because the player hit UNDER the ball scooping it. A lot of players think they have to ADD slice and usually make errors. The slice backhand is a very soft delicate swing. It uses the weight of the racquet to send the ball forward. With the air flow underneath the ball carrying it past the net you do not want to muscle it for extra speed. Have a good swing speed that isnt muscled and isnt "checked" either. When players are late on contact or misjudged the ball, they usually accelerate their swings too much and the ball sails.

With topspin you can hit harder because the airflow on top of the ball will cause it to come down. With slice it is the opposite. Hit with a nice smooth rythm for a good slice backhand.

The swing for a backhand slice is deceiving because it starts out high and then goes lower towards the ball. However, if you want it to penetrate you have to level the swing about 1-1/2 feet before impact and followthrough.

Some players swing path is HIGH LOW HIGH and others is HIGH LOW. The point is at impact the racquet needs to level or at least have a very small angular path to the ball for a penetrating slice.

There are those that can have a "chopping" motion and really hit good slices, but those players have excellent timing and are not making contact UNDER the ball.

TO help me with my slice I usually aim for the upper half to make contact, by the time I hit the slice I hit it in the middle of the ball with a slightly open racquet face. It goes over fast and is very penetrating.

The continental grip can be used just make sure you close the racquet face a little. If you have trouble popping it up it might not be the grip but your swing path when making contact with the ball.

Search my "freeze" and "balance" drill for the slice backhand.

Rickson
09-13-2004, 05:22 PM
No worries, TS, we're here to learn from each other. I actually switched to a backhand grip that's closer to continental than extreme backhand because I was netting too much on the backhand drive. I had no problems slicing though with the extreme grip, go figure.

soulincontrol
09-14-2004, 04:53 PM
spread your wings.

Real McCoy
09-14-2004, 05:34 PM
As far as contacting the ball behind, even, or infront of a player, where would you recommend for the backhand slice?

Rickson
09-14-2004, 06:13 PM
As far as contacting the ball behind, even, or infront of a player, where would you recommend for the backhand slice? I usually make contact around a foot in front of me.

TwistServe
09-14-2004, 07:05 PM
As far as contacting the ball behind, even, or infront of a player, where would you recommend for the backhand slice?

I've seen the USPTA tips thing on TTC: How to do a slice.. "its not how fast, it's how early"

Mahboob Khan
09-14-2004, 07:32 PM
TwistServe post Sept 12 said it all. He has provided good definition how to execute slice BH.

Yes, both grips -- continental or eastern BH -- could be used for slice. I have also seen many players using eastern forehand grip for 1 handed slice backhands. I do not recommend it. Obviously, with the eastern FH grip, the racket face is more open at contact.

Some salient features of a good slice:

Grip: Continental or eastern backhand:

-- Left arm helps in taking the racket back, causing upper body to turn.

-- The racket is held besides or over the left shoulder .. hitting side of the strings pointing to left ear .. upper body coiled.

-- From this height, the racket descends/accelerates to defuzz the ball ..

-- At time of contact the racket is partially open .. maybe 45 degree on normal sliceable balls.

-- Follow through is part of the swing .. racket may finish above the net height or slightly above the contact height.

The question was how to get speed on 1handed slice? Well, the racket must accelerate prior to contact NOT after contact!!!

Real McCoy
09-14-2004, 07:42 PM
As far as contacting the ball behind, even, or infront of a player, where would you recommend for the backhand slice?

I've seen the USPTA tips thing on TTC: How to do a slice.. "its not how fast, it's how early"

Can you post the link - all I find about hitting in front deals with the topspin backhand, nothing on the slice.

a529612
09-15-2004, 09:36 AM
I do the slice when the ball is near shoulder height. Am I hitting it too high?

Chanchai
09-15-2004, 01:07 PM
Question.

I find that for my slice backhand to be very effective, I have to really put myself into the shot by either really stepping in (putting my weight into the shot), really rotating the upper body (like a hip turn) through the stroke, or even cross-step behind (for a righty, step behind with left which closes the body position as I move forward). In the end, I guess this just translates to "moving forward" as I hit the slice backhand, for it to be effective.

My question is, is this a mandatory fundamental or just a stylish thing? To "move into" the ball so to speak--moving forward via any of the methods above, during a slice backhand.

I mean, sure I could slice the ball with a hack down or diagonal method while being stationary, and though it may have a lot of backspin or slice action, it'll usually be that arc-shot that experienced players are used to returning. When I step into my shot (and acccomodate swingpath), I can usually get that driven slice shot that skids low on the ground--even if I had to seemingly "scoop" the ball because I was returning a low shot.

What makes it all weird is that I sometimes step in so drastically (but with good results as far as the shot goes) and hitting "early" is not really a good way to describe it because it looks like I'm hitting almost late (ball parallel with my right shoulder--I'm righty)--but that seems to be a function of really going "into" the shot. One of the issues I have with the slice backhand I've been describing this whole message is that it does use up quite a bit of energy. I also mix in a more defensive chip-slice on occasion which is generally effortless and it's only really redeeming quality is placement and buying time.

-Chanchai