PDA

View Full Version : Maximize strengths or mitigate weaknesses?


ghssf
04-08-2007, 03:46 PM
I guess it's all a balance, but would you say -- when picking a new racquet -- you do it more with an eye toward one that enhances the things you do well or one that improves the things you do poorly?

In my case, I've narrowed my racquet choice down to a few that can boost my serve (which could use boosting) but they're not known for offering much feel (and I like to get to net and volley well).

thanks!

IT WAS IN!!!
04-08-2007, 03:49 PM
you just need to pick the best overall racquet

fgs
04-08-2007, 03:56 PM
ghssf,
you should try to go for a balanced approach. it's good to improve on your serve, and generally what works good on the serve (higher static weight, headlight balance) will also work well on volleys. but inbetween your service-games you will also have to hit some returns and you'll eventually be stuck into a rally until you can make that approach shot - if you're stick can't decently handle these situations too you will have a very one-dimensional game.

Noveson
04-08-2007, 04:08 PM
You want to lean towards something that fits your game, a racquet isn't going to do much to improve parts of your game. If you plan on learning to volley better, you might want to get a racquet that is okay or good with vollies, that doesn't mean go for the Slazenger X1.

Bottle Rocket
04-08-2007, 04:21 PM
You want a racket that will maximize your strength, but allow you to improve your weakness.

I think the issue of "feel" is interesting. In my opinion any solid volley, spin, or drop shot player can still hit shots just as well with a boardy feeling racket. I seem to be the minority on this, but I think racket "feel" is overrated. It seems like it is used more as an excuse than anything else.

Roger_Federer.
04-08-2007, 04:26 PM
I agree with Bottle Rocket

Noveson
04-08-2007, 04:29 PM
You want a racket that will maximize your strength, but allow you to improve your weakness.

I think the issue of "feel" is interesting. In my opinion any solid volley, spin, or drop shot player can still hit shots just as well with a boardy feeling racket. I seem to be the minority on this, but I think racket "feel" is overrated. It seems like it is used more as an excuse than anything else.

You would have to feel like that considering you use a PC. I don't see how racque feel is overrated, if you don't like how it feels when you hit the ball how could you like the racquet? Feel s one of the most important things to me.

fgs
04-08-2007, 04:32 PM
bottle rocket,
i think "feel" very much comes down to what you have been using along your tennis playing life - i've seen quite a few young guns playing absolutely incredibly "feely" dropshots with a pure drive strung with ballistic polymono. i play nice drop shot too with an nblade 106 strung with nxt tour at 51m/49c. i think it would take me the next 100 years to do the same with the pure drive, while those young guns would need probably 10 years to play those dropshots with my blades.:D
"feel" gets you into that psychological comfort zone, and while entirely subjective in nature, it has a big effect in competitional tennis - in my opinion of course, which is not and will never be the absolute and only truth.

Roger_Federer.
04-08-2007, 04:33 PM
Basically, whichever racquet works for you, use it

Craig Sheppard
04-08-2007, 06:19 PM
I guess it's all a balance, but would you say -- when picking a new racquet -- you do it more with an eye toward one that enhances the things you do well or one that improves the things you do poorly?

In my case, I've narrowed my racquet choice down to a few that can boost my serve (which could use boosting) but they're not known for offering much feel (and I like to get to net and volley well).

thanks!

I often ponder this question. I try different racquets and many times come across this conundrum. You have to minimize your weaknesses. Any good player (you don't say what your level is) from 4.0 on up will find your weakness and beat on it. That is not to say that you should select a racquet strictly to help your weakness. But you need to choose a racquet that will give you confidence. You already have confidence in some of your shots, I would choose a racquet that you feel confident with all around. That's what makes a racquet the best racquet for you.

I loved the feel of my last racquet (Fischer Pro 1), but I was not confident in my backhands or volleys with it. I just felt like needed a switch. I chose the Wilson n6.1 because my backhand is much more solid with it, but at the expense of a bit of my serve (one of my strengths). The benefits are worth the costs, because I hit a lot more backhands & volleys in a match than serves.

You need to find that racquet that strikes the best all-around balance that will give you the most confidence in your game.

Bagumbawalla
04-08-2007, 07:00 PM
The primary concern (it seems obvious to me) is to find a racket that suits your style and needs.

Weaknesses are usually improved more through practice and dedication than by picking up a new racket.

bluetrain4
04-08-2007, 07:16 PM
Pick a racket that maximizes your strengths. Fixing weaknesses will come with practice.

[K]aotic
04-08-2007, 08:16 PM
i agree with bluetrain. u can't depend on a racquet to make ur weakenesses disappear. u hafta isolate it, and then work on it through drills and stuff like that

ghssf
04-10-2007, 04:48 PM
thanks everyone!