PDA

View Full Version : 1-handed backhand guide


drummerboy
09-14-2004, 11:17 AM
Hi

I decided to switch to a 1 hander because my 2 hander sucked. I decided this is final and I will never go back. I don't care about loosing some games now. I think I can improve faster with 1 hander and I used to play it like a kid so I know the rough coordination for the stroke. I tried it out today and it felt great. I was much more relaxed just swinging away and not having to put the second hand on the grip. Now to my question.
Which are the most important points to be carefull about when hitting a one hander. I noticed some balls were flying long because I opened the racquet face. I met some balls to much in front of me and to much to the body. So please all of you good one handers share some of your ideas and your experiences.
Thanks

Rickson
09-14-2004, 11:26 AM
Be careful when balls come behind you, late hits usually fly to the left if you're a righty. To make sure this doesn't happen, stand behind the baseline when you take your backhands. I know you might be thinking you should stand behind the baseline anyway, but some opponents hit very short and force you inside the baseline. Another thing is, learn how to hit the 1hbh to all angles; most newbies to the 1hbh only hit to the right if they're righties and vice versa. Learn how to hit the 1hbh crosscourt, down the middle, and inside out.

drummerboy
09-14-2004, 12:33 PM
Thanks for the tip Rickson. The interesting thing is I had the most problems with the short balls without any pace. When I was getting some paced balls or playing passing shots I played some really good backhands but putting away some easy short balls was a problem. It's gonna take some work but I am determined and optimistic about it.

Bungalo Bill
09-14-2004, 12:45 PM
The key to developing a good onehander is to NOT try and add things like forearm rotations, wrist flicks etc.

For service returns, spend time learning how to block the serve back for different placements.

Make sure you get the racquet 12 inches below the contact point before making your swing up to the ball. Let your natural swing of the arm which will automatically create a 30 degree upward rise to the ball happen. Dont jump, twist, hop, or anything else that could alter this swing path. As a twohander you will have a tendency to overrotate. Use the non-dominant hand to stop the rotation once your shoulders are facing the 45 degree angle, then let the arm bring the racquet forward smoothly.

Rise naturally inot the shot as you transfer weight onto your front foot. Be sure to practice for two months hitting slow balls to get your body coordinated into the shot so you can feel the weight transfer and its affect on the shot.

Swing smoothly and swing long through the shot finishing high.

Do not lose your lateral position to soon or you will pull the racquet off track. Stay long in the shot.

Make sure you feel your non-dominant hand strong in the takeback, grip change, and helping you guide the racquet down to the "sword in the sheath" position. Once it is ready to be pulled out, then start your upward swing to the ball.

Always bend your knees. Once you begin your swing to the ball be sure to keep your head still. Bring the racquet back but keep your hitting hand within the width of your shoulders. Relax the front shoulder so you can pull it under your chin before beginning the downswing and forward swing.

I might be joining you again to relearn the onehander as a consistant shot. I hurt my lower back again and I think my days for the twohander is about over. So, I will be learning with you!

Always always remember, the onehanded backhand is aboout TIMING. Not rotation or muscling the ball. Later you can add a little forceful rotation like Flipper used to do.

Find out where you like to hit the ball and develop your timing from there.

drummerboy
09-14-2004, 01:51 PM
Great info Bill. I know it is gonna take some time but you have to admit it that 1 handed backhand is a beautiful stroke to play and it is a special feeling when you hit that perfect relaxed in the sweetspot one hander. Sorry to hear about your back. Have fun with making your one hander a consistant shot.

finchy
09-14-2004, 02:17 PM
drive with the butt of the racquet just as a forehand. it adds topspin and lets you go through the ball more, in my experience.

Bungalo Bill
09-14-2004, 03:15 PM
The driving of the butt cap is a good concept but few really explain it well. What ends up happening is players start pulling the butt cap and then either overrotate or lose the swing path.

The pulling of the butt cap is more of a tug. The tug happens at the very beginning of the stroke and lasts only a short time as the racquet gains momentum. It is initiated by the shoulder muscles.

Once the tug is over, the racquet should glide along the swing path and the arm will naturally bring the racquet around. Unless the player wants to use an extreme grip there is no need to accelerate the forearm rotation as they are learning to develop a consistant backhand. That can come later once they feel confident.

The key in learning a onehanded backhand is to relax the shoulder and arm without the arm losing its form and ability to guide the racquet face into the ball. After the takeback the racquet should fall into the "sword in sheath" position. The pull or tug you're referring to happens at this point from the shoulder to initiate the forward move to the ball. The tug is very brief.

The driving of the butt cap doesnt really contribute to the "going through the ball more" but it does help initiate a straighter swing path into the ball. There are many factors that contribute to someone going through the ball.

The biggest contributing factor in going through the ball more is the step forward to transfer weight onto the front foot. That is a big time key to making clean contact with the ball for the onehander.

The onehander needs to have strong stomach muscles as strong stomach muscles help to maintain good posture. The onehander needs to exxagerate the feel of the legs planting and pushing from the ground as contact is made when practicing.

To hit with topspin you simply need to have the racquet below the ball and swing up brushing the ball. The swing speed can be achieved to hit a "heavier" ball by many different techniques - not just the pulling of the butt cap. Right now, there should be no concern to hit "more" topspin. There should be a great concern to develop a dependable onehanded backhand by executing the basics very well with a good amount of topspin.

steve s
09-14-2004, 03:48 PM
First thing get your racquet low, we think we do but have someone
watch to be sure your low enough.

Second, force the racquet head to be flat to the ball.

Third take a full complete swing, does not have to be hard but go from low to high in a smooth swing to get topspin.

papa
09-14-2004, 05:45 PM
Da__ good stuff although I generally use two hands. You guys have even got me into thinking I should give it a try - I do at times and realize the 1ba does have some huge advantages like reach, backspin and net play to name a few. Balls that are in my strike zone are relatively easy to hit with both hands with good success - its just all the others where I can't get very much pace on the ball.
I can also get pretty good backspin on the ball with two hands but I telegraph the shot so much that its difficult to get away with it.

Hope I have better luck with this than that 5 - 11 serve idea where I just about broke my leg with the racquet.

Rickson
09-14-2004, 05:50 PM
LOL, you actually tried that 5-11 serve?

papa
09-14-2004, 06:25 PM
Rickson wrote:

"LOL, you actually tried that 5-11 serve?"

Well, there was so much chatter about the damn thing that I wondered if it was even possible - you know, maybe I was missing something so I gave it a whack. And what a whack it was - on about the second attempt I struck my left shin with so much force that I almost went down -- I mean it brought tears.

Most of you guys have very constructive ideas but than somebody chimes in and have me wondering if we're playing the same game.
I'm a lot older than most of you but I want to keep at it and will listen - never to old to learn.

finchy
09-14-2004, 07:34 PM
papa, are you right handed? or left? because a a supposed 5-11 serve would be just like a slice serve for a righty. if you want a kick server for a righty, brush 7-1 i think. someone might need to clarify that.

predrag
09-15-2004, 09:20 AM
Rickson wrote:

"LOL, you actually tried that 5-11 serve?"

Well, there was so much chatter about the damn thing that I wondered if it was even possible - you know, maybe I was missing something so I gave it a whack. And what a whack it was - on about the second attempt I struck my left shin with so much force that I almost went down -- I mean it brought tears.

Most of you guys have very constructive ideas but than somebody chimes in and have me wondering if we're playing the same game.
I'm a lot older than most of you but I want to keep at it and will listen - never to old to learn.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I am afraid I am the one who led you into the 5-11 try :)

Hitting the shin happens, sometimes to the best of us :)

Yes, it is possible and quite effective, however you need to be careful.

Regards, Predrag

papa
09-15-2004, 04:17 PM
Predrag:

I'm right handed --- well you know its funny, I kept reading that post which, as you know, went on for some time and it got me thinking (always a problem) that maybe someone (in this case you) had discovered some new fangled serve approach. After limping around for a few days I am no worse for the experience and certainly don't hold any negative feelings about the incident.

I'll tell you one thing that I didn't know however, was that the "clock" imagine that we've all grown to love, is based on it being parallel to the net. For some reason I have always thought of it (the clock) as being "my" view of the ball - I don't know who made that observation (think it was BB) but it was new to me.

predrag
09-16-2004, 07:43 AM
Predrag:

I'm right handed --- well you know its funny, I kept reading that post which, as you know, went on for some time and it got me thinking (always a problem)
[snip]

Yeah, I know. When I think, I get a headache. Therefore ...
:):):)

I'll tell you one thing that I didn't know however, was that the "clock" imagine that we've all grown to love, is based on it being parallel to the net. For some reason I have always thought of it (the clock) as being "my" view of the ball - I don't know who made that observation (think it was BB) but it was new to me.

Now you have me scratching my head.

What do you mean as "your view"?

If you hold the ball in front of your eyes, with the net in the background
and replace it with a clock.
That's the view I am talking about.

Regards, Predrag

Bungalo Bill
09-16-2004, 11:20 AM
I think he means his view from an angle as he tosses over his hittiing shoulder for the twist.

predrag
09-16-2004, 11:22 AM
I think he means his view from an angle as he tosses over his hittiing shoulder for the twist.

Like, from underneath?

Regards, Predrag

Bungalo Bill
09-16-2004, 01:03 PM
I think he means his view from an angle as he tosses over his hittiing shoulder for the twist.

Like, from underneath?

Regards, Predrag

Could be or from where the ball is in relation to his eye. In other words, many players think of the clock face based on the position of how their head is facing the ball.

The clock reference for the serve is alwaysin relation to the net. So if I hung the ball on the back fence facing towards you, the clock face needs to be imagined from that point of view. The clock face doesnt change the direction it faces even though you can walk to the side of it and turn your head to see it.

Obviously, being an advanced player you know what I mean. The clock face on the ball does not change based on the direction you are seeing the ball, it is always referenced to the baseline or the net in front.

papa
09-16-2004, 04:35 PM
BB wrote:

"I think he means his view from an angle as he tosses over his hittiing shoulder for the twist."

Yes, for some reason thats what I thought - strange but true. Hey, I might not be the brightest bulb on the tree but I stay with it and its amazing what an old dog can learn.

lendl lives
09-16-2004, 05:08 PM
a really good AND consistant one handed back hand drive is the hardest shot in tennis, maybe too hard.

JohnThomas1
09-16-2004, 11:19 PM
It is tough, i'm still developing for sure. There are probably only three very good ones in my city.

Rickson
09-16-2004, 11:25 PM
It is tough, i'm still developing for sure. There are probably only three very good ones in my city.
I don't live in Australia.