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View Full Version : how to beat someone that slices all the time?


finchy
09-16-2004, 09:39 AM
hi, i would like some advice to someone who slices all the time. its a girl, and she's #1 on the jv team. all of the other girls are sick of her play (but she's really nice in person) and dont really know how to beat her. all she does is slice. forehand, backhand, anything, even serves. noone has EVER seen her hit a regular topspin shot, EVER.

i'm a guy and would like to tell the other girls how to beat her because, IMO, she doesnt deserve to be #1. i know a good idea is to just slice it back or push, but eventually it will mess up their timing.

edit: and she slices them very deep.

Camilio Pascual
09-16-2004, 09:44 AM
i'm a guy and would like to tell the other girls how to beat her because, IMO, she doesnt deserve to be #1.
edit: and she slices them very deep.

Interesting, why do you think she does not deserve to be #1? Is she losing her matches? Are there or should there be style points assessed in these matches?

Rickson
09-16-2004, 09:47 AM
The slice is the easiest shot to volley so go to net on her a lot. If she has a good lob, don't employ the net strategy as often, but do it occasionally to keep her on her toes. Play the angles a lot and make her run around. Don't try to topspin low balls, but get them back deep and be prepared to get to the net and put away any loopy sliced balls.

finchy
09-16-2004, 10:30 AM
i do not think that she deserves to be #1 because there is this 1 girl on the team that is definitely better in all areas than her but the "slice girl" keeps on beating everyone.

im not sure how she does in match play, but im pretty sure that the girl who is definitely better has a great topspin forehand and 2hbh should be #1. she gets the ball back deep w/ lots of topspin but all the other girl does is slice it back.

she gets it back with very little pace.

kevhen
09-16-2004, 10:39 AM
Dealing with a slicer: I typically will go to net approaching to their backhand side if they don't hit hard or heavy spinning passing shots. Usually a rally slicer like you have described won't have great passing shots but may had a nice lob, so be ready for that. The other way to play is to just hit slow, safe rally shots until she hits a short one and then go in and attack that one with sharp angles or a deep shot. If you don't give her pace she may not be able to hit back with much pace with her slice shots. I would recommend taking pace off your shots to make her struggle more, even slice some back at her and see if she likes that or not. She deserves to be #1 if she keeps the ball in play the longest regardless of the spin she puts on the ball. As a forehand slicer myself, you can go far just by outrallying your frustrated opponents. Nobody ever said a slicer can't be a nice person!

Golden Retriever
09-16-2004, 11:06 AM
Took me 2 years to develope a really good forehand to finally overcome a slicer. There's just no other way. You either slice back and be ready for a 5min rally on every point or take control with at least one weapon. The forehand being the best option.

aahala
09-16-2004, 11:14 AM
Are we talking about JV girls in High School?

If so, these girls are unlikely(what an understatement!) to be able to go to the net and volley. There's quite a few pretty good female pros who aren't good at that.

Most likely at this level, few can get much more than 50% of the balls back, whatever the nature of the shot to them or the shot they wish to make. It's all about consistency.

Tell the others to get more balls back by paying more attention to detail, keep their eyes on the ball, move their feet a little to be better positioned and go for the center of the court.

PusherMan
09-16-2004, 11:18 AM
Footwork footwork and footwork. That's assuming your strokes are sound.

Slices tend to give most people problems on the forehand side. The ball stays low, so it's tough to get under the ball with modern grips. Since you already know this opponent will slice most of the time (no variety), then you need to be prepared to move your feet to the proper position to hit the ball early. You should be able to handle slices more easily on the backhand side with slices of your own.

You should not be trying to rally for extended periods of time with a consistent slicer. Your high bouncing topspin balls(or even your own slices) will not typically pose a problem to the slicer unless they are outright winners. The best option is to wait on a ball you feel confident you can drive into the corner, then come to net. Be ready for the lob, since this particular slicer doesn't seem confident enough to come through the ball.

finchy
09-16-2004, 11:32 AM
btw, this is in doubles. we had a practice yesterday, and i saw the slice girl for the first time play. the overall better girl has a wicked temper too. she got mad at her partner because she didnt take a volley because she thought it was going out. she through her racquet on her way to the ball.

kevhen
09-16-2004, 12:15 PM
Yes, JV girls usually have much better groundstrokes than vollies, so they may just want to not hit hard and work on getting everything back against the slicer or maybe even bring the slicer to net with dropshots to avoid the long baseline rallies.

Camilio Pascual
09-16-2004, 12:24 PM
Finchy, your candidate for the best player sounds like she is a lousy doubles player. Throwing a temper tantrum at your doubles partner for committing the sin of imperfection is terrible doubles play. Tennis isn't just about strokes, slice girl may have your candidate soundly beaten in the emotional, mental, and team work aspects.

@wright
09-16-2004, 12:30 PM
You can't solve a riddle to make a different player "the best". The best player always wins, if slice girl always wins, she's the best and she should represent your school at #1.

finchy
09-16-2004, 02:28 PM
yes yes i know, but alot of the girls dont know how to deal with the slice so i guess ill tell them...? it'll help the team to deal with potential slicers in the future.

mucat
09-16-2004, 02:36 PM
hmmmm, she hit her shot deep means all the other girls do not have enough stuffs to pressure her and force her to hit the ball short, she deserve to be #1 totally.

The problem is not her slicing, it is other girls playing worse than her. Slice is mostly a slow defensive shot, others should have enough time to get to it and setup a offensive topspin shot with it and like others mentioned volley is also good idea.

Chris.L
09-16-2004, 02:52 PM
There is this old italian female pro with a wicked backhand slice and a paceless forehand moodball. But she has had a long and successful career because all the young hard hitting junior players often can't deal with the low biting slices.

Frankly.... for this girl to be able to slice her forehdn so consistently and be number 1 on the team beating ALL the other girls in her team.... you are even asking us how to beat her? She sounds like a very good player.
I actually enjoy playing consistent slicers because it gives me the opportunity to work on my movement and stamina.
I ususally just moves the ball around the court with sharp angles. Remember... on thing about a slice is that it is SLOW and predictable.... and that does NOT change.... there is no fast slice that you cannot anticipate.... therefore these girls should be focusing on their footwork when playing her and really trying to move the ball left to right. Keep this cutie on her toes.... i am not under the impression that this girl would enjoy being moved around the court front to back, left to right for over an hour.... etc. If these girls can get into a 'consistent' frame of mind.... tone down ther attack.... they have the topspin in their shots right? --- well don't try to overpower her.... just MOVE the girl relentlessly.... i know that is how i beat all girls.... some of them are actually very good players.... so i don't try to do anything in particular.... most girls tend to be half a step slower anyway.... so move this girl and watch her faulter!

finchy
09-16-2004, 03:11 PM
There is this old italian female pro with a wicked backhand slice and a paceless forehand moodball. But she has had a long and successful career because all the young hard hitting junior players often can't deal with the low biting slices.

Frankly.... for this girl to be able to slice her forehdn so consistently and be number 1 on the team beating ALL the other girls in her team.... you are even asking us how to beat her? She sounds like a very good player.
I actually enjoy playing consistent slicers because it gives me the opportunity to work on my movement and stamina.
I ususally just moves the ball around the court with sharp angles. Remember... on thing about a slice is that it is SLOW and predictable.... and that does NOT change.... there is no fast slice that you cannot anticipate.... therefore these girls should be focusing on their footwork when playing her and really trying to move the ball left to right. Keep this cutie on her toes.... i am not under the impression that this girl would enjoy being moved around the court front to back, left to right for over an hour.... etc. If these girls can get into a 'consistent' frame of mind.... tone down ther attack.... they have the topspin in their shots right? --- well don't try to overpower her.... just MOVE the girl relentlessly.... i know that is how i beat all girls.... some of them are actually very good players.... so i don't try to do anything in particular.... most girls tend to be half a step slower anyway.... so move this girl and watch her faulter!

im not the one playing her. :? even our #1 boys jv is afraid to play her. lol. i'd like to play her just for fun.

lenosucks
09-17-2004, 06:15 PM
is this high school? And how competitive is the highschool tennis-wise?

finchy
09-17-2004, 06:19 PM
yes this is high school. our girls really suck. only our varsity players are worth noticing.

IMO, they dont really care, but care enough to want to play and beat other people, but not really to improve. so w/e.

Kobble
09-17-2004, 07:16 PM
You need good strokes to beat those kind of people. A good strategy is to hit one of those short topspin angles like Fed does, then follow it the net. A lob from inside the the baseline would be a tough play for her, and the only passing shot she could hit with any kind of pace would be down the line. If she tryed to pass a player with a short crosscourt slice she would be stupid. So, by doing that the only shot to be threatened by is a down the line slice, that shouldn't be too tough to deal with.

lenosucks
09-17-2004, 08:04 PM
haha kobble you think this girl, a highschool JV player, will be able to hit "one of those short topspin angles like Fed does?"