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View Full Version : Serve Looked Good - But hey, Don't give another two serves!


Lindros13
05-03-2007, 06:22 AM
My opponent hit a first serve that was very close to the back of the service line. I actually thought it hit the line (or it was simply too close to call out) and I played the return without saying anything. But he didn't play out the point.

I guess technically, I could call it my point, if I wanted to, since it's my call and he didn't play it (correct?) but most of my games are friendly so I wouldn't do that, especially since it was a close call and could have been out.

So I said, "I thought it was good!".

He said, "It was out by 3 inches!"

So I said, " OK,....then TAKE 1 even though I thought it was good!"

For the longest time, I had always given my opponent 2 serves under this scenario since I thought the serve was in. However, it dawned on me....he didn't think it was in, ....and he didn't play out the point - then why should I give him 2 serves again? (even though I thought it was good). HE IS THE ONE WHO DIDN'T PLAY OUT THE POINT. So therefore, if he thought it was out, he should only get 1 more serve!

Correct? What do you like or dislike about that logic?

kingdaddy41788
05-03-2007, 06:26 AM
I think it's fair, but a lot of people might not. Technically it's your point, and you should take it. But if it's a friendly game, why not give him two serves since he's clearly been distracted (even though it is, in fact, his fault) between the first and second?

Supernatural_Serve
05-03-2007, 06:47 AM
why not have a discussion with your opponent that his opinion is meaningless especially since the rules say so and the service line 60 feet away is obscured by a net. Thus, he has hard time arguing that he can see it more clearly than you.

Lindros13
05-03-2007, 07:14 AM
why not have a discussion with your opponent that his opinion is meaningless especially since the rules say so and the service line 60 feet away is obscured by a net. Thus, he has hard time arguing that he can see it more clearly than you.

Good suggestion, but if you enter into any type of lengthy discussion, then you must certainly either a) give 2 serves because it clearly broke up the rhythm of play or b) take the point. And if I tried to convince him that it's my point and my call (that he should've played it), then he'll probably be pretty upset since he didn't even attempt to go for the ball. This may be the appropriate course of action in a league match but for playing with guys I know, I'm not so sure. Therefore, I don't want to have a discussion to only then give 2 serves! So I'm back to my original analysis, and that is, just let it go... but only give him 1 serve!

Unless of course it was CLEARLY in. Then I agree with you. In that case, I could possibly see myself saying, "Hey pal, I know we're buddies, but it was clearly in, and you shouldn't quit on a point because your topspin actually pulled it down at the last minute....My point!" He still may have a hard time with that, but if it was CLEARLY in, then it's not fair for him to get another free chance at an ace or even a second serve which I could blunder.;)

Supernatural_Serve
05-03-2007, 08:16 AM
Good suggestion, but if you enter into any type of lengthy discussionI don't think that explaining the rules of tennis to someone constitutes a break in play.

If that were true, a person could claim rules ignorance anytime they want in order to claim a break in play, that's gamesmanship.

Ignorance or pretending to be ignorant of the law or rules is no excuse and certainly not a cause for bettering their situation with 2 serves.

However, in this case I would give him 2 serves and tell him to stop whining and learn the rules.

kevhen
05-03-2007, 08:27 AM
In a friendly match, if your opponent insists that his serve was out, just agree and let him serve his second. Make sure he isn't just doing this when your returns land in though. Technically he is not allowed to call lines on your side but in friendly matches, we often try to make sure we call lines as accurate as possible even if it is against ourselves.

pmata814
05-03-2007, 08:59 AM
My opponent hit a first serve that was very close to the back of the service line. I actually thought it hit the line (or it was simply too close to call out) and I played the return without saying anything. But he didn't play out the point.

I guess technically, I could call it my point, if I wanted to, since it's my call and he didn't play it (correct?) but most of my games are friendly so I wouldn't do that, especially since it was a close call and could have been out.

So I said, "I thought it was good!".

He said, "It was out by 3 inches!"

So I said, " OK,....then TAKE 1 even though I thought it was good!"

For the longest time, I had always given my opponent 2 serves under this scenario since I thought the serve was in. However, it dawned on me....he didn't think it was in, ....and he didn't play out the point - then why should I give him 2 serves again? (even though I thought it was good). HE IS THE ONE WHO DIDN'T PLAY OUT THE POINT. So therefore, if he thought it was out, he should only get 1 more serve!

Correct? What do you like or dislike about that logic?

(It doesn't make sense to give him 2 serves if he stopped play because he thought it was out. It has to be only one more serve.)

Technically it's your point but I'm curious...do you have the tendency to hit back the serve when it was out and make the late call? My brother used to do this a lot and it annoyed the heck out of me. If you have a tendency to do this that's probably why he stopped play, and since you are buddies, it's ok to give him a second serve.

I ALWAYS yell "no" immediately and just stop the ball...this way if I hit the ball back it's obvious I'm playing it and it's my point if he doesn't go for the ball.

predrag
05-03-2007, 09:32 AM
My opponent hit a first serve that was very close to the back of the service line. I actually thought it hit the line (or it was simply too close to call out) and I played the return without saying anything. But he didn't play out the point.

I guess technically, I could call it my point, if I wanted to, since it's my call and he didn't play it (correct?) but most of my games are friendly so I wouldn't do that, especially since it was a close call and could have been out.

So I said, "I thought it was good!".

He said, "It was out by 3 inches!"

So I said, " OK,....then TAKE 1 even though I thought it was good!"

For the longest time, I had always given my opponent 2 serves under this scenario since I thought the serve was in. However, it dawned on me....he didn't think it was in, ....and he didn't play out the point - then why should I give him 2 serves again? (even though I thought it was good). HE IS THE ONE WHO DIDN'T PLAY OUT THE POINT. So therefore, if he thought it was out, he should only get 1 more serve!

Correct? What do you like or dislike about that logic?



Actually, server HAS to play the receiver's call on the FIRST serve.
The code says here that SERVER is getting benefit of the doubt. Technically,
he should have an advantage, since his first serve is supposed to be better
than his second

Now, if server sees SECOND serve out, even though returner did not call it,
by the Code, server should call it on himself.

So, you are actually being nice giving second serve to your opponent, let
alone first :))

Regards, Predrag

Lindros13
05-03-2007, 09:33 AM
Unless it's very far beyond the baseline, I typically do hit it back, even if it's out, because I've already committed my body to the stroke. I'm typically playing with 4.0 or 4.5 players so the serves are usually coming with some good pace and it is often times difficult to hold up on a shot. That's a good point though. I wonder if I could try to get in the habit of NOT hitting it back when it's out, even if it's close. I don't know if I could stop myself or not, I usually don't bother trying. Yes, I call it nice and loud and as quickly as possible if it's out. I don't think I've ever upset anyone in recent memory with a late call per se.