PDA

View Full Version : favorite tennis book?


randomname
05-03-2007, 11:19 AM
I think im gonna try reading a tennis book over the summer and was wondering what one of the better ones is. any advice is appreciated

cstephenson
05-03-2007, 11:25 AM
I think im gonna try reading a tennis book over the summer and was wondering what one of the better ones is. any advice is appreciated

What kind of book are you looking to read. A tennis story, Mental Game, technique?

beernutz
05-03-2007, 11:35 AM
Best tennis book I've ever read by far: You Cannot Be Serious by JMac.

randomname
05-03-2007, 11:43 AM
I was thinking more along the lines of an instructional book

cstephenson
05-03-2007, 12:03 PM
Its hard to go wrong with "The Inner Game of Tennis". Great read if you haven't already. I have a great instructional book called Tennis Guru:Re-Strung in 24 Hours. This won't keep you busy reading all summer. Its fairly short but packed with pure instruction. Another option would be www.hi-techtennis.com There would be plenty of info to read and watch to keep you busy all summer.

cghipp
05-03-2007, 12:24 PM
I recently picked up "Pressure Tennis" because I heard it was good.

Tennismastery
05-03-2007, 12:41 PM
Go to the books section on TennisWareHouse and click on the feedback sections of those books which have feedback. There are a number of very good books (and a few so-so books!) out there.

Solat
05-03-2007, 05:59 PM
inner game of tennis FTW!

netman
05-03-2007, 06:12 PM
"Inner Game of Tennis". You can read it in a day. Then you need to re-read it several times at your leisure. Once it sinks in you will be way ahead of the game. "Smart Tennis" is another good one.

"A Handful of Summers" is one of the best books ever written about the tour. It covers the time after WWII until right when it went pro. A wonderfully written book that captures the magic of tennis before the money deluge turned it into a circus.

Instruction is tougher. I'm convinced if you took all the instructional books and videos and tried to follow them you would give up in frustration since they would cancel each other out. So find one that matches your style and use it to improve upon your strengths.

-k-

Bodacious DVT
05-03-2007, 06:31 PM
im sorry, i absolutely hated the Inner Game of Tennis. It may be a personal opinion, but i thought it was by far waaaay to theoretical. I felt that it was very seperated when it refered to your game as having "two selfs". ive read it twice and feel like i havent learned anything of true value, where as Winning Ugly directly related to my mental game. it is just my opinion tho.

so if you want an instructional book, get winning ugly. ive read this about 5 times now, and i pick up something new every time. its by far the best tennis book ive read, and has made my mental game top notch. definitely worth a try.

zapvor
05-03-2007, 07:09 PM
i like the one with pictures of kournikova.....hmm cant remember the title

tenniskid3119
05-03-2007, 07:10 PM
only one i've read is "Winning Ugly" by Brad Gilbert. its a pretty good book

fuzz nation
05-11-2007, 08:25 PM
Learned a lot from Vic Braden's Mental Tennis and also liked Brad Gilbert's Winning Ugly. No reservations on recommending either one.

Dave Smith contributes plenty of solid advice here (thanks mister) and I'm probably going to look at his book next (Tennis Mastery).

NLBwell
05-11-2007, 10:36 PM
Levels of the Game -- One of the best books I've ever read of any type!

Editorial Reviews
Review
"This may be the high point of American sports journalism."—Robert Lipsyte, The New York Times

"McPhee has produced what is probably the best tennis book ever written. On the surface it is a joint profile of . . . Arthur Ashe and Clark Graebner, but underneath it is considerably more—namely, a highly original way of looking at human behavoir . . . He proves his point with consummate skill and journalistic artistry. You are the way you play, he is saying. The court is life."—Donald Jackson, Life

"John McPhee's Levels of the Game . . . alternates between action on the court and interwoven profiles of the contestants. It is a remarkable performance—written with style, verve, insight and wit."—James W. Singer, Chicago Sun-Times
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description
This account of a tennis match played by Arthur Ashe against Clark Graebner at Forest Hills in 1968 begins with the ball rising into the air for the initial serve and ends with the final point. McPhee provides a brilliant, stroke-by-stroke description while examining the backgrounds and attitudes which have molded the players' games.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

------------------------

It can instruct you about life.

-------------------------

Slazenger
05-11-2007, 11:55 PM
If you can get hold of "Tennis Course" Volumes 1 and 2 by the German Tennis Association/Federation get it.

It's a really good book. Volume 1 deals with 4 major topics
- Theory of movement,
- the ball in flight and bounce,
- tactics
- technique.

It's pretty comprehensive.

I especially loved the 'ball in flight and bounce' section because it really went into the physics of what's going on with the ball in air, at the bounce, the effect of spins etc
It's just information I like to know (not that it enhanced my game noticeably)

Volume 2 is more for coaches and those wanting to teach tennis.


PS
To the person who said German Tennis Association endorses Eastern Bh grip for slice, I don't see it in this book.

thetruthshallsetyoufree
05-12-2007, 01:31 AM
the rivals, by johnette howard. about evert and navratilova's rivalry. lots of insight into the life on the tour. i loved it. couldnt put it down.

paulfreda
05-12-2007, 04:40 PM
One outstanding instructional book was written by Pancho Segura in the 70's. It is large in dimensions about the size of a sheet of paper and softcover. I forget its title and my library is in storage right now. But if you find that book you will learn more about tennis than you can imagine. Great book.

zapvor
05-12-2007, 05:46 PM
the rivals, by johnette howard. about evert and navratilova's rivalry. lots of insight into the life on the tour. i loved it. couldnt put it down.

i am reading this now. great book!

dunloplayah
05-12-2007, 08:04 PM
Best tennis book I've ever read by far: You Cannot Be Serious by JMac.

Reading this now and "the inner game of tennis" by tim gallwey

ps60
05-13-2007, 12:35 AM
'tennis for Dummy' by J. McEnroe's brother...
Kidding, it is the worst tennis bk in English.

've read a lot, i think everyone has some inputs. Some are a little boring, some are fun and easy to read.

keithchircop
05-13-2007, 06:15 AM
what about Total Tennis? does it cover serving with spin, kick etc?

randomname
05-13-2007, 12:35 PM
well, right now im currently reading the inner game of tennis and it seems like its going to help, and I'll probably read tennis mastery next (btw dave, very impressive not plugging your book in a thread asking for reccomendations on a book to read) but I was wondering what some of the more experienced teaching pros had to say about some of the ideas in the inner game of tennis. will it really help my game or is it mostly a load of BS?

Tennismastery
05-13-2007, 01:07 PM
well, right now im currently reading the inner game of tennis and it seems like its going to help, and I'll probably read tennis mastery next (btw dave, very impressive not plugging your book in a thread asking for reccomendations on a book to read) but I was wondering what some of the more experienced teaching pros had to say about some of the ideas in the inner game of tennis. will it really help my game or is it mostly a load of BS?

Random...Yeah, I felt it would be too pretentious to mention my book here!

Regarding the Inner Game, in a nutshell, it is a very good book with a great premise dealing with the mental game in discussing 'self 1' and 'self 2'. However, one point I don't agree with is Gallwey's discussion of learning tennis with little regard to identification and understanding of proper stroke mechanics, grips and footwork. In my 35 years, I have found that few players, (if any!), develop skilled stroke elements through the simplistic approach to 'hitting the ball with whatever feels comfortable.' Gallwey talks about his "bounce-hit" philosophy as the means to develop as a tennis player. This is blatently wrong if we are talking about developing tennis to reach skilled levels of achievement.

Using the "bounce-hit" concept is terrific AFTER the player has learned to utilize a desired swing pattern using the right grip and understanding the goal of how to hit topspin. I have used it after students understand and can emulate the stroke pattern that will ALLOW them to master more effective topspin strokes. It is a great way to get kids and adults to focus on 'where the ball is' and other advantageous concepts.

In my book, I do discuss some of these concepts regarding Gellway's book and others too.

I have read his book several times and feel it is a book for the ages. Along with Brad's book (Winning Ugly). Others of merit: High Tech Tennis (by Gropple), Visual Tennis (John Yandell), My Seven Years as the William's Sister's Hitting Coach, (Dave Rineberg), and two non-tennis books that helps tennis players: "Mastery" by George Leonard, and "Zen in the Martial Arts" by Joe Hyams.

Tennismastery
05-13-2007, 01:19 PM
If you like Inner Game, read, Tennis...Play the Mental Game by David Ranney.

www.maxtennis.com is the web site too. David was a top-ranked junior player in the 60's, became a student of Timothy Gallwey's and his information found in his new book is a great application of Gallwey's classic.

keithchircop
05-14-2007, 09:11 AM
i read zen in the martial arts a few years ago and remember liking it very much. however, i dont know how it could help my tennis game at all.

what's your opinion on Total Tennis: A Complete Guide for Today's Player by burwash?

Tennismastery
05-14-2007, 09:29 AM
i read zen in the martial arts a few years ago and remember liking it very much. however, i dont know how it could help my tennis game at all.

what's your opinion on Total Tennis: A Complete Guide for Today's Player by burwash?

Keith, I found Zen to complement that which Gellway, Gilbert and others have discussed in the areas of mental tennis.

I have not read Peter's Total Tennis yet...I'm sure it is good as I like a lot of what Burwash has presented over the years.

JCo872
05-14-2007, 09:39 AM
I think im gonna try reading a tennis book over the summer and was wondering what one of the better ones is. any advice is appreciated

Get Dave Smith's book, TennisMastery: http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageSGTA-MASTERY.html..

I have read just about every tennis book out there. Dave's book is different for four reasons.

1) It has pictures of pro players to prove his points. It's amazing how few books do this and use drawings instead.

2) He goes into complete technical detail - from grips to key arm and body positions. You would be amazed at how tennis books almost never go into this kind of crucial detail. They give you abstract advice like "step into the ball" which is pretty much useless. You want to know what your body and arm and racket should look like in the key phases of the stroke.

3) Dave realizes that progression comes from technical advancement - not from just hitting tons of balls.

4) Dave know how to TEACH. It's a rare gift. Trust me on this one.

Jeff

Ano
05-14-2007, 06:43 PM
WINNING UGLY by Brad Gilbert.

dufferok
05-15-2007, 10:17 AM
I recommend John Yandell's book, "Visual Tennis". I also HIGHLY recommend getting a membership to John's website w w w . t e n n i s p l a y e r . n e t.

The website is full of articles and illustrations, slow motion videos of pros and a great forum for more technical talk.

atatu
05-15-2007, 11:11 AM
"Maximum Tennis" by Nick Saviano is excellent. I've recently been re-reading "Coaching Tennis" by Chuck Kriese and it's really pretty good also, not sure if it is still in print.....

andreh
05-16-2007, 04:38 AM
I have one simnply called Tennis Course vol1. It has excellent step-by-step instruction for all strokes, strategy, and also som technical stuff about spin, surfaces etc.

smoothtennis
05-16-2007, 06:41 PM
i read zen in the martial arts a few years ago and remember liking it very much. however, i dont know how it could help my tennis game at all.

what's your opinion on Total Tennis: A Complete Guide for Today's Player by burwash?


Total Tennis by Peter Burwash is an excellent book on the the game, the skills needed to play, and how to improve. I think he coveres the basics needed to play a sound complete game, and enough principles that you can build on it in practice. You have to practice what he teaches.

Technical, but practical too. Not a difficult read, but it takes a while to get his concepts down in practice, and match play. ie, it is a book that will help you develop your overall game on many levels if you put some effort in.

tennis_hand
05-17-2007, 01:15 AM
I just finished the Inner Game of Tennis. It helps.
I especially like this advice: feel what is right for you. try out the instructions and feel what is right for you.

joe sch
05-17-2007, 05:53 AM
"Arthur Ashe on Tennis" has everything any player would want in a tennis book. Its a classic must read. It is a combination of "inner tennis" and "winning ugly" coming from a truely great champion and person !

smoothtennis
05-17-2007, 08:48 AM
Inner Tennis is a great book. I know it may seem very odd to a lot of people at first. What the author is trying to do, is introduce people to the realities of the sub-concious mind (self 2), and how it works. This applies in other areas as well, including weight loss, fitness, business, and personal life.

See, the mind absorbs and performs in ways most people are not aware of. And this book takes aim at introducing some of these concepts as they apply to tennis specifically.

There are other books that use this approach to a large degree, such as Breakthrough Tennis, but keep in laymans terms.

I agree you can't ignore sound physical stokes, but the process of learning and what to think while hitting, is really good in Inner Tennis.