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khs_tennis
09-19-2004, 04:07 PM
I play #1 doubles for my high school and tomorrow we're playing this team that is notorious for cheating really bad. I would know because that cheated us out of atleast five winners and another couple of shots the last time we played them in the season. Thing is, they are our rivals from a school close by so it's even more important. Each and everytime they called shots out, my partner and I were 100% sure each shot was in. One time we hit a lob over the front player's head and the back guy let it bounce and it hit a good 4 inches BEFORE the line and without missing a beat, the guy called it out. We went beserk on him and he did nothing about it. Calls like that almost cost us the match. So my question is, what do you do about calls and players like this. I know I'm going to get responses like, "don't worry about bad calls", stuff like that, but truth is, these guys are notorious for bad calls and I'm not going to take it anymore. So any info would be gladly appreciated.

Rackethead
09-19-2004, 04:26 PM
I saw a Harvard vs. Princeton game. One guy called a ball out -- the other guy said "no way" . He appealed to the umpire but she said she didn't see it. A few points later the other guy hit a ball close to the line -- he said "Out!" The other guy said "I honestly saw (the earlier ball) out".

Not that I'm advocating this -- but if they cheat on the line calls you can cheat right back. You can even do it on something obviously in, to make the point that they were cheating.

I've never played anything remotely competitive so have never had any incentive to do something like this. Just telling you what I saw.

papa
09-19-2004, 05:13 PM
Rackethead said:

"I saw a Harvard vs. Princeton game. One guy called a ball out -- the other guy said "no way" . He appealed to the umpire but she said she didn't see it. A few points later the other guy hit a ball close to the line -- he said "Out!" The other guy said "I honestly saw (the earlier ball) out". "

This is a little confusing, at least for me. However, I think I understand what your saying.

Mistakes do happen but to take matter into your own hands on just one point is a little bit too much.

College tennis is extremely fast paced (both Harvard and Princeton have very good programs) and its difficult to get all calls correct. In most matches there are roving umpires and very few, if any, line judges. I have had the privilege of seeing many Ivy League games in all sports - these schools have extremely honorable athletes/programs and have competed against each other (and others) for many, many years.

jun
09-19-2004, 07:01 PM
talk to the coach and get a line judge.

khs_tennis
09-20-2004, 05:19 PM
Good news, we beat them but it took three sets, 6-2 6-7 (8-10) and 6-3. We were up 5-4 and i was serving for the match in the second but they of coursed called a first serve that was clearly in, out and his partner hit a bad return. So that got me shaken and i double faulted and then we came back and were up 40-15 and then my partner missed 3 straight poaching volleys that should've been easy putaways. In the tiebreaker we were up 6-2 and as you can read, we lost. My anger was going through the rough and i really just felt like walking off the court but me and my partner pulled it together when we got down and break in the third and then broke back and got control of the match and won. A really tough match.

Baseline Basher
09-20-2004, 07:03 PM
talk to the coach and get a line judge.

Yup. Get a line judge that will watch the entire match. Roving judges won't be watching just your match. Demand a judge if you have to. Cheaters need to be put away.

Rackethead
09-21-2004, 05:52 AM
Rackethead said:

"I saw a Harvard vs. Princeton game. One guy called a ball out -- the other guy said "no way" . He appealed to the umpire but she said she didn't see it. A few points later the other guy hit a ball close to the line -- he said "Out!" The other guy said "I honestly saw (the earlier ball) out". "

This is a little confusing, at least for me. However, I think I understand what your saying.


To clarify -- the Princeton guy called out a ball that was actually in -- the Harvard guy objected -- the Princeton guy said "I saw it out". Later the Princeton guy hit a ball close to the line (but clearly in) when the roving umpire wasn't there -- and the Harvard guy called it "Out!". Both guys knew what was going on here, so the Princeton guy didn't bother to argue that the ball was actually in -- he argued instead that he had made an honest call (or honest mistake) earlier and that the Harvard guy shouldn't "punish" him for this.

The Harvard guy didn't bother to argue that he wasn't cheating -- instead he said "look you did it to me on a tiebreaker this was just a game" i.e. saying that the other guy cheated on a more crucial point so that was worse :)

Hedges
09-21-2004, 08:12 AM
During my high-school doubles days, I'm not proud of it, but here's how we handled cheaters. For the rest of the match, if a sitter came our way, we'd pound the cheater with the ball...in the balls. We'd called it "cheater's balls"...

--Hedges

papa
09-21-2004, 01:54 PM
Thanks for the clarification Rackethead. In the heat of the moment anything can happen but unless its a patern or someone is clearly cheating, I wouldn't let it get to me much - one point doesn't make a match.

I have serves (and other line shots) called out, like everyone else, mostly on hard surfaces where the ball doesn't leave a clear mark. It does get to me but you don't want to get thrown off of your entire game over one or two calls. Keep in mind that line judges will make mistakes too - you see it all the time.

I understand your frustration but feel that you have few options that are good for you.

Hedges
09-23-2004, 10:10 AM
khs_tennis,

My college team employed a more civilized (and effective) method than the "cheater's balls" method we used in high school.

We trained our spectators (consisting of girl friends, roomates, family, friends and the rest of the tennis team) to cheer loudly (very) as soon as any ball hit close to the line that the cheating opponent might call out. If they still call it out, the crowd would go ape-sh*t...it could get pretty insulting at times.

It was not gentlemen's tennis...more like a baseball game...but it worked...and the crowd seemed to enjoy it. I know we did ;-)

Have fun!
Hedges