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neomanxl
05-12-2007, 08:00 AM
Well, to start my question I will give some background information. I play with a ncode 90 strung at 60 with luxilon ace 18, however, I still get an amzing amount of power (a little too much for me), I use an exteme eastern to semi-western grip for my forehand and an eastern grip for my 1handed backhand.

So i was fooling around the other day and i realized that I could control the power of the racket by choking up on the racket handle, so I started to hold the racket with the heel of my palm about .5-1 inch from the butt of the racket. I found that this really gave me more control with my shots and i didn't feel as "clumsy" when hitting some shots.

My question is, are there any disadvantages to choking up on the racket (besides the obvious reduction of length and power), and is this advisable for someone who has a little too much power like me?

dave333
05-12-2007, 09:14 AM
Lack of reach?

As for power, I'm surprised you are getting too much power with a tour 90 w/ luxa at 60 lbs. Perhaps you hit with the racquet face too open?

jasoncho92
05-12-2007, 09:37 AM
.5 inches is ok but you shouldnt be getting a lot of power with your setup. Its pretty much a full control set up

Bottle Rocket
05-12-2007, 09:50 AM
Yeah... You've got an interesting problem.

I think it depends on how good you are... What level are you playing at?

Rarely does anything good ever come out of choking up on the racket besides short-term improvement. You've got to learn how to fully control your strokes.

The downsides are loss of power, loss of reach, loss of wrist mobility, and just simply taking away the advantage of using a racket versus a paddle.

Ripper
05-12-2007, 09:58 AM
You just discovered some of the cons and pros of standard length racquets against extended length racquets. In between other things, standard length offer more control, while extended length offer greater spin (because the face of the racquet is traveling faster).

Edit: Choking up or not gives you the same cons and pros.

neomanxl
05-12-2007, 11:11 AM
I don't know my exact NTRP rating since I have never been tested but I play 4 singles on my school varsity team (we have won the state championship for the past two years, and I won states on my flight both years)

I know that it is wierd that I get to much power, but it is not just me, when my friends play with my racket they also say that it is really powerful.

Is ther anything I can do to reduce this power?

Bottle Rocket
05-12-2007, 12:15 PM
Try Luxilon original versus the Timo you use now. It is a much lower powered string, but you will still get ridiculous spin.

I have never completely understood how a racket can be too powerful, especially someone at your level, but you are the only one that knows what is right for you.

It sounds like you either have to make some sort of adjustment with your stroke, or that racket just really isn't for you. Had you tried other rackets before you chose that one?

What is your power issue? Do you just simply hit the ball long? Does it go wide when you go for short angles?

Bagumbawalla
05-12-2007, 02:19 PM
Imagine a teeter-totter that in one case is evenly ballanced (same length on both sides on the fulcrum) and one that has 3/4ths on the far side and 1/4th on your side. Pushing down on your end, which will require less effort?

Same thing with rackets.

From this starting point, you may draw further conclusions at you leisure.

Good luck,

B

zapvor
05-12-2007, 04:52 PM
I don't know my exact NTRP rating since I have never been tested but I play 4 singles on my school varsity team (we have won the state championship for the past two years, and I won states on my flight both years)

I know that it is wierd that I get to much power, but it is not just me, when my friends play with my racket they also say that it is really powerful.

Is ther anything I can do to reduce this power?

yea...thats weird. why dont you switch to a woodie. that should take care of the power problem.

kingdaddy41788
05-12-2007, 04:57 PM
Don't choke up on the handle unless you want to significantly damage your game. Try a thicker guage of string than 18 if you're getting too much power. And maybe increasing your tension. Choking up on the racquet is a horrible call.

VGP
05-12-2007, 05:21 PM
Choking up is a personal choice, but it does offer increased control....I wouldn't say it's "horrible" but maybe a quarter to a half inch....

a modern example....

http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2006/writers/justin_gimelstob/04/13/clay.season/p1_nadal.jpg

Zina Garrison holds the racket in the middle of the handle....

http://www.tennisserver.com/turbo/images/hartford98/ZinaGarrison50.jpg

Brad Gilbert chokes up too.....

zzzbrianxxx
05-12-2007, 05:31 PM
From personal experience I can tell you that choking up for volleys just like in that picture of Nadal is INCREDIBLY effective. I've always been a good vollier, but I basically went from a 4.5 vollier to a 5.0 vollier just by choking up on the racket. I had instantaneous improvement. The increase in racket head control is unbelievable. Once I discovered this I, to this day, tell everybody I know who plays tennis about it.

Also, I've seen dominik hrbarty (sc?) choke up on the racket for serves. I don't like doing that though. It feels weird and you need the extra leverage.

As for groundstrokes though, I wouldn't recommend doing so unless your of small stature.