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View Full Version : How do you hit the ball to the sweet spot each and every time?


lidation
05-12-2007, 03:11 PM
I started playing 2 months ago and the past 2 weeks I have been practicing everyday, either against the wall or with friends. I improved a lot but still I find out that I can't hit the ball using the sweet spot on my racquet. When it doesn't the racquet will vibrate a lot and the ball doesn't have power.

How do you practice making sure that at least 90% of the time you hit the ball with the sweet spot? I try very hard the past week but doesn't seem to get any more consistent.

kingdaddy41788
05-12-2007, 03:19 PM
watch the ball and practice.

raiden031
05-12-2007, 04:16 PM
Unfortunately it will take years of practice, not just a few weeks or months.

Infiniteshadow
05-12-2007, 04:23 PM
Hmm, this my friend will take alot of time to perfect. It is not one of those things that one can learn from a forum (trust me). I would advise you to join classes or hire a coach. Yes, the more you play the better you get. But playing like junk with your friends will not help you. Keep it up and oneday you might hit a few balls with Federer. (i donno if he will actually play at that age but... ok stop questioning me its to give you hope and something to look forward to ...kinda like a goal lol)

SFrazeur
05-12-2007, 04:30 PM
Which racquet are you using?

-SF

lidation
05-12-2007, 04:35 PM
Which racquet are you using?

-SF

I mainly use a Pro Kennex Kinetics 5x. 11.8oz, 100 sq. in. I can't handle my other Liquid Metal 4 don't know why.

Thanks for the tips. I know, I know it takes time to develop the skills. But I just don't want to keep practicing my errors. I see a coach every two weeks and his advice to me was keep practicing. I have seen him only twice so far though. He helps a lot by correcting many of my movements.

I ask 'cause I'm kinda impatient. :D

Tikiman53
05-12-2007, 04:43 PM
I know a lot of people on this board seem to hate any racquet that has a head size larger than 100 sq. in, but maybe you should try an oversize racquet. I used one when I was a beginner, and it helped me make solid contact with the ball. Then, when I got a bit better, I moved onto midplus racquets. You should try it.

I tried the liquidmetal radical OS, and I liked it. Maybe you should look into that.

dave333
05-12-2007, 05:14 PM
You just have to watch the ball. Hand eye-coordination really helps. My buddy who really hasn't played that much rarely misses the ball because he used to play baseball so he is very good at hitting the sweetspot.

tricky
05-12-2007, 05:22 PM
Honestly, this is where having a coach look at your mechanics will really help. Could mean you're not keeping your head still while hitting through the ball. Could mean you're not really driving through the ball or that you're "arming" it. Could mean a 1000 other different things.

That said, you could also try volleying drills with the backwall. This will better teach you to watch the ball and make hit the spot.

SFrazeur
05-12-2007, 05:36 PM
I do not know anything about that PK racquet or any other PK's for that matter. But just because a racquet is 100 inches does not mean it has a large enough sweet spot for a beginner.

Also, there is no shame in a OS racquet. I never saw Agassi walking around shamed. I first started w/ a Targer bought Wilson Court EX, a $20 aluminum racquet. I then went on to the Wilson Hammer 7.4 OS, believe me, that made the worlds of difference for me. You should talk with your instructor, tell him the situation and see what he recommends.

Some instructors are gun shy when it comes to recommending a new racquet or different racquet, fearful of being seen as a product pusher on commission. Which to an extent, they are.

zapvor
05-12-2007, 05:38 PM
I mainly use a Pro Kennex Kinetics 5x. 11.8oz, 100 sq. in. I can't handle my other Liquid Metal 4 don't know why.

Thanks for the tips. I know, I know it takes time to develop the skills. But I just don't want to keep practicing my errors. I see a coach every two weeks and his advice to me was keep practicing. I have seen him only twice so far though. He helps a lot by correcting many of my movements.

I ask 'cause I'm kinda impatient. :D

LM 4 is crap anyways. but yea practice.

edit: i demoed the Prince O3 white last week,and the sweetspot on that thing is HUGE. like on my serves i could mishit so bad and it still went in with good pop. but i normally use LM prestige, so maybe thats why

SFtennisGG
05-12-2007, 08:09 PM
practice...practice. watch the ball all the way through to contact with the strings. although, after only 2 months there are probably a lot of other things that are preventing you from hitting the sweet spot more often.

Tennisplayer92
05-12-2007, 08:10 PM
i had issues with that, slow down the swing and uhh if your an extemist like me practice with a 65 inch head and see how horrible its like to have such a small head and FORCE your body to learn

jasoncho92
05-12-2007, 08:11 PM
Unfortunately it will take years of practice, not just a few weeks or months.
In 2 months i was hitting sweetspot 80% lol. It was on a 106 inch racquet though

Swissv2
05-12-2007, 08:12 PM
In 2 months i was hitting sweetspot 80% lol. It was on a 106 inch racquet though

but were you hitting it in and not flat?

Nelson
05-12-2007, 09:24 PM
I would suggest that instead of worrying about your racquet size that you work on stroke mechanics and technique. 100 sq in is a fairly large head size and it's not like you're trying to hit with a 90.

Try to keep your eye on the ball, if you look at slow motion videos of federer, he looks at the ball at contact and a bit after. I would also suggest fixing your stroke mechanics and swinging it correctly. If you swung your racquet differently every time then technically you're making contact at a different point every time (sometimes too close, sometimes too far, in front, behind).

If you cannot afford a coach or lesson (which is the best way to go), then having an knowledgable friend teach you or scower these boards for technique, footwork etc. I find mini tennis (warmup drill) is great because you're not concentrating on hitting it for a winner but making good contact, technique and footwork.

Everyone will hit less on the sweetspot the more tired they get because usually if footwork goes then so does everything else.

Mick
05-12-2007, 09:31 PM
I agree with what Nelson wrote. It's easier to hit the sweet spot with a larger headsize racquet but you have to in the position to execute that shot .

solidtennis
05-12-2007, 09:33 PM
well the 2 things I think will help you the most here,
1, focus on the ball to the extent of trying to read the print on it.( I constantly see players shank the ball while being attacked all because they are watching the attacking player not the ball) Remember the ball is attacking you not the opponent
2, keep your head still through out the shot.Its hard to use you eyes to focus when your head is moving around all over the place

oh yeah and practise, practise, practise

jasoncho92
05-12-2007, 09:36 PM
but were you hitting it in and not flat?
Well i obviously couldnt hit all of em in but they were almost always topspin shots

solidtennis
05-12-2007, 09:37 PM
Oh yeah one more thing dude,
regardless of what people tell you its not the racquet that makes you shank the ball.Dont get caught up with the racquet, head size etc roller coaster, technique and concentration are the ones to focus on if you want to hit the ball more cleanly.

Bagumbawalla
05-12-2007, 10:02 PM
I am going to agree with Solid tennis and just add to that.

A larger-headed racket has a larger sweet spot and makes hitting the ball easier, in a sense-- but it also makes it easier to hit the ball incorrectly without knowing it, because it is so forgiving.

If you want to learn to really focus on hitting the ball in the center of your strings and getting the feel of the sweet spot, I suggest that you go to a thrift shop or yard sale and buy an old wodden racket. Almost any kind will do (except an obvious toy).

You want the wood racket, not because they are better, but because they are less forgiving and will remind you whenever you hit off-center.

If you miss the sweet spot with a wood racket, it feels awful, dull, twangy, harsh, jarring. If you hit the sweet spot, it feels smooth, crisp, effective, clean, powerful.

Practice against a wall and really focus on the ball. Watch it as it leaves your racket, arches to the wall, rebounds, strikes the court, and as much as possible right back to your strings.

Hit through the ball smoothly, moving your weight through the ball at impact. Focus on being in positiion and achieving a clean feel.

When you go back to your Pro Kennex (I use a Pro Kennex too) It will feel AMAZING.

Good luck,

B

ps60
05-13-2007, 12:23 AM
hit your legs if they don't run to the correct position. :D

i've been playing for 2x yrs. still has a lot of framer. So i use heavy frames, then even framer can be winner :grin:

Mad iX
05-13-2007, 01:52 AM
Most important thing is to keep your eyes on the ball. This you will learn relatively quickly.
You also need good footwork to get into position, and lastly you need to have solid and consistent strokes. Both of which only come with practise.

ericwong
05-14-2007, 03:49 AM
I started playing 2 months ago and the past 2 weeks I have been practicing everyday, either against the wall or with friends. I improved a lot but still I find out that I can't hit the ball using the sweet spot on my racquet. When it doesn't the racquet will vibrate a lot and the ball doesn't have power.

How do you practice making sure that at least 90% of the time you hit the ball with the sweet spot? I try very hard the past week but doesn't seem to get any more consistent.


Hi,

My suggestion is different from the rest of the posters here. To aid your focus on the ball, you could stencil the centre of the racquet. Every racquet, regardless of their square head size, has a sweet spot. Locate them and color the sweet spot with ink or what-have-yous. Everytime, you swing for the ball, you should be able to see the spot on your racquet if your technique is correct ( ie , laid-back wrist etc ). Constantly try to hit the ball on the spot against the wall. Practise as much as you can until you can hit the spot without the ink-spot on your racquet.

Cheers.

origmarm
05-14-2007, 04:03 AM
I would say three things:

- Watch the ball onto the racquet. There is some debate on this but for a beginner I would say its a no brainer. I see a lot of beginners that don't do this. Sounds like stating the obvious because it is
- I like the dot idea in the previous post
- Good technique and footwork make this a lot easier. Find a pro and get this sorted from day one, its worth it

The racquet can help but don't let it worry you, its the least important part of the picture, a good player can play with any racquet, better with some than others but the effect is far more marginal than good form, footwork and practice

GS Dubs
05-14-2007, 12:54 PM
A drill I would suggest that you can do by yourself or with someone else is to drop the ball to yourself for a forehand. Already have your racquet back and front foot out. Drop the ball, swing through and step. Focus on watching the ball. If done correctly you may just barely see the ball before it bounces. This way also helps you gain depth because you can focus on the twist in your trunk. My students (mostly beginners, but good for any skill-set) hate when we do this because I demand them to focus on the ball, their trunk and the catching of the racquet with the opposite hand, but if you do focus each time, it can be an effective drill.

chris1992
05-14-2007, 01:00 PM
Most importantly i would say, is find a racket that suits you and your standard. Unless you are a beginner, the more you practice, the more accuracy on the racket you will get and with the help of the drills in the other posts, you will be hitting the sweet spot on most occasions.

It is a great feeling to send your rackets to the stringers and the strings only fading on the centre of the racket.

ShooterMcMarco
05-14-2007, 02:25 PM
I don't think the solution is to "just watch the ball," you have to be focused on it; the two are very different. I can watch the ball and miss just as badly as I had when not watching it. You can watch it inactively or you can focus on it and be more actively involved.

lidation
05-14-2007, 03:01 PM
You guys are so helpful! I got more tips here than from my coach, whom I saw once every two weeks.

jasoncho92
05-14-2007, 03:51 PM
I just played with my friends ncode six one tour and i got less mis hits with it than mine somehow lol