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HellBunni
05-14-2007, 08:45 AM
I was thinking, can someone who has mastered the drop shot and lob dominate the tennis world?
I.E.

1.) The player would have to have a reliable serve.
2.) Be able to play a drop shot anywhere on the court
3.) Be able to play a lob anywhere on the court.

Andres
05-14-2007, 08:49 AM
No, cause they're not percentage tennis strokes. And once you have hit 5 dropshots, it's doesn't have the surprise factor anymore.

But it's great to have both strokes in your arsenal. A good dropshot is great in ANY surface, but hardcourts :)

kevhen
05-14-2007, 09:44 AM
You could try it against Federer, but I think he will get to your dropshot early and hit an angled winner. If he hits back to you and you lob, you will need an awesome topspin lob as he will smash anything totally great for a winner. Players would anticipate your dropshots and would be hitting you deep heavy groundstrokes that would be hard to hit great dropshots against. You need much more than a dropshot and a lob to dominate the tennis world.

HellBunni
05-14-2007, 09:58 AM
when I say a great dropshot,

I mean it's should be something that even if the opponent is waiting for it, he wouldn't we able to get to it before the ball is below the net.

Because you can just draw the opponent to the net then hit a great lob to pass them. Just repeat until he/she is tired out.

NoSkillzAndy
05-14-2007, 10:47 AM
In answer to your original question: No... unless you are talking Prince of Tennis style drop shot where the ball doesn't even bounce, it just stops there on the ground spinning like a top. Even if it bounces a little bit, players will find a way to see it coming and do something with it. At the highest levels you cannot dominate with only a mastery in one or two shots. Even if you have the best dropshot and lob on the tour you still would have to get your serves and returns in and work the point from there just to set up your one-two combination (that they will know is coming).

And IMO if you have to hit a lob after your dropshot then you are doing something wrong. Dropshots should be hit when your opponent is out of position or wrongfooted so that they don't have much of a chance at getting to it or doing anything with it if they do. Otherwise there is too little margin for error and you will have to hit too good of shot for it to be effective, likely resulting in unforced errors.

EDIT: I'd like to add though that dropshots can be very effective at the recreational levels if you know what you're doing. The problem is that when most people hit dropshots they either go for too much or too little and lose the point because of it. One trick I've learned over the years is to hit most of my drop shots to the backhand sideline. Even if they get there they will be forced to hit their weaker shot on the run with a ball that is at or below net level. Let them try!

SourmonkeyG
05-14-2007, 10:55 AM
Who wouldn't love to see a new pro with Prince of Tennis shots though huh? That'd make the sport so one sided hahaha.

kevhen
05-14-2007, 11:01 AM
Pro players are too fast and get to dropshots early while they are still bouncing pretty high. You would have to hit a low one that just clears the net which is very very difficult. Pros won't get tired of running back and hitting finishing overheads off your lobs.

Your strategy would work better on clay since you would have more time to setup a great dropshot and then harder for your opponent to stop and run back to cover the lob after sliding forward on clay.

Andres
05-14-2007, 11:04 AM
when I say a great dropshot,

I mean it's should be something that even if the opponent is waiting for it, he wouldn't we able to get to it before the ball is below the net.

Because you can just draw the opponent to the net then hit a great lob to pass them. Just repeat until he/she is tired out.
If that would be the case, Coria, Nalbandian and Hewitt would be #1, #2 and #3 in the rankings... and as you can see... they're not ;)

Slazenger
05-15-2007, 01:33 AM
And IMO if you have to hit a lob after your dropshot then you are doing something wrong. Dropshots should be hit when your opponent is out of position or wrongfooted so that they don't have much of a chance at getting to it or doing anything with it if they do. Otherwise there is too little margin for error and you will have to hit too good of shot for it to be effective, likely resulting in unforced errors.

I disagree. This is just point construction. The drop then slice lob is a great combo. In any case, you should come in after your well placed dropshot, to intercept a possible return and to put additional pressure on your opponent to do something with his return.

It's just like approaching the net after hitting an overhead.

ps60
05-15-2007, 09:24 AM
this combination can **** off anyone. including Fed. See his face next time when somebody does it to him successfully.

kevhen
05-15-2007, 09:30 AM
Wouldn't the reverse combination work better, much like many clay court players use with deep loopy topspin to drive the opponent back and then finishing with a dropshot?

HellBunni
05-15-2007, 09:54 AM
right, my point is that if you mix them up, even if the opponent knows what is coming up next there is very little they can do about it. (assuming the drop shots and lobs are executed good).

they'll be running back and forward or going for broke. if all you practiced are these shots, then they should be "high" percentage shots for you, while you force your opponent to run around and play "risk" shots.

KickShine
05-15-2007, 10:03 PM
If you got good at drop shotting and lobbing you might throw some people off their game. But I doubt that this tactic alone would work against good players. You'll have hell trying to break strong servers as if you can only slice returns back they'll be serving and volleying. If you lob they should be able to intercept it.

But in general, if you can only slice and lob, opponents will stand farther in the court and start hitting sick angles. This makes them weak against a strong shot but neither the slice nor the lob present any real difficulty for the skilled player.

Also, when I think of something that seems too good to be true, I ask why it isn't being done. Why aren't the pros drop shotting and lobbing all day instead of pounding topspin? Probably because such tactics require perfection, if they work at all. It's similar to my friend saying, "I bet if someone could get good enough to hit a ball that hits the net cord and goes over every time they'd own." I can't say for sure but since the pros aren't doing it it probably doesn't work in reality. I'm not advocating inside-the-box thinking but don't get your hopes up with theory alone.

Hot Sauce
05-15-2007, 11:11 PM
They're good skills to have, but if you tried to make up for a weak something else with a great drop shot/lob, that wouldn't work. Basically it's good to have a good lob and drop shot, but it wont help you if you can't set them up well.

NoSkillzAndy
05-16-2007, 12:25 AM
They're good skills to have, but if you tried to make up for a weak something else with a great drop shot/lob, that wouldn't work. Basically it's good to have a good lob and drop shot, but it wont help you if you can't set them up well.

I agree completely. These are supplemental shots that can very useful in certain situations. But I think if someone is going to try to build their game around them then they are probably going to run into a lot of problems, such as having to set up the point in order to use the drop shot or lob and their opponent being ready for it after seeing it over and over again.

I personally use both of these shots quite frequently, but usually not together. And I think they are definately underappreciated. The drop shot is often seen as a gimicky or last resort shot that players don't really expect to work. Lobs are used probably more often by the average player, but almost always they are used defensively to try to get back into the point, rather than win the point. I love to hit offensive lobs off my opponent's approach shots or first volleys. It is really surprising how well you can hit a lob when you have time to setup for it and it does wonders to make players think twice about rushing the net.

However, even though I hit more drop shots and more lobs in match play than just about everyone I've ever played with, they are really just a small part of my game. And even though IMHO I can execute both shots pretty well, they are still easily countered by the better players. I do know one 5.0 player in Austin that hits more drop shots and lobs than me (and he's better at it too), but he is a very unique player in alot of regards. Although he is very good at what he does, he loses to the better 5.0-Open players.

My point is that these shots can only take you so far, even if you are really really really good at them ;)