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View Full Version : How far down handle do you hold the racquet?


tdnxxx444
09-21-2004, 08:25 PM
Hi,

I was wondering how far down the handle does everyone hold their racquet? I usually hold the racquet with the bottom edge of my palm exactly at the bottom end of the racquet. Today, however, I held the racquet with my palm a lil farther down past the butt a little and noticed my serves were my consistent...

tennisfreak
09-21-2004, 09:36 PM
I hold my racket so that there is about 3/4 inch of my palm showing over the buttcap. My pinky wraps around the bottom edge of the grip.

sandro
09-22-2004, 04:00 AM
I used to grip very low, with pinky almost out of butt. Since I moved up (looking at an old picture of Ivan Lendl!), my groundstrokes and volleys are much more powerful and controlled. But yes, I'm missing something only on 1st flat serves.

kevhen
09-22-2004, 05:35 AM
I grip very low when serving hard flat serves but choke up on other strokes and other serves and especially on the return against a big server.

johnthecoach
09-22-2004, 07:46 AM
Hold it where it feels comfortable. I have many friends who, when playing the volley, hold the racket near to the throat, and so for them make the racket feel more balanced.

Bungalo Bill
09-22-2004, 04:01 PM
I used to grip very low, with pinky almost out of butt. Since I moved up (looking at an old picture of Ivan Lendl!), my groundstrokes and volleys are much more powerful and controlled. But yes, I'm missing something only on 1st flat serves.

Sandro,

You hold the racquet like I do. You have probably found that power comes more from timing and hitting the ball cleanly then a whippy racquet. And like you said, you get the added benefit of control on groundstrokes, volleys, half-volleys, swinging volleys, etc.

For the serve, you do need to take the opposite approach. A looser grip helps the serve, especially the first serve. This is also proper technique. But holding the racquet to tight or too far up, you prevent or limit the muscles in the forearm to work well and the wrist has trouble staying loose. In this case, I would move the hand down some to get that motion going faster and more fluid.

Illegal_edge
09-22-2004, 04:42 PM
I hold my racquet by the throat and throw it straight down to the ground. I didn't know that you were supposed to hold on to your racquet. I keep throwing mine.

Bungalo Bill
09-22-2004, 04:55 PM
Hold it where it feels comfortable. I have many friends who, when playing the volley, hold the racket near to the throat, and so for them make the racket feel more balanced.

Interesting, holding the racquet near the throat for volleys. Seems a little high to me.

I tried the "do what feels comfortable" route for many years. It doesn't work. It can keep a player from progressing because they could be holding the racquet in a place that they think feels comfortable but is deterimental to his ability to control the racquet head or stay loose.

So I don't buy the "just do what is comfortable" junk. It is cop out coaching to me.

Sometimes you just have to get used to a change if it is right for you.

Sounds like if you apply the "just do what feels comfortable" if you feel like streaking around the tennis court or playing naked go ahead and do it if that makes you feel comfortable.

Bunch of junk.

Illegal_edge
09-22-2004, 05:05 PM
interesting, holding the racquet near the throat for volleys. Seems a little high to me. Ha Ha . I only hold my racquet by the throat when I volley it against the ground.

VTL
09-22-2004, 10:45 PM
Doing what is comfortable can be a cop out most of the time; however, as long as you're getting the results, there shouldn't be a problem

predrag
09-23-2004, 07:13 AM
[snip]
Sometimes you just have to get used to a change if it is right for you.
[snip]
Bunch of junk.

Exactly.

Comfortable is something that we are just used to.

If you are trying to learn something, just repeat it 1000 times and it will feel natural and comfortable :)

Regards, Predrag

Bungalo Bill
09-23-2004, 09:09 AM
Doing what is comfortable can be a cop out most of the time; however, as long as you're getting the results, there shouldn't be a problem

Here is my point. If a person has learned to hit an Eastern Forehand serve because it feels comfortable would you as a coach knowing the persons goals to improve leave it there because it feels comfortable? Even if they are getting the ball in the box?

If you as a coach saw a person hitting the onehanded backhand with a eastern forehand grip would you as a coach leave it there even if they are hitting most of them in and they said it felt comfortable?

If you as a coach saw someone not bending there knees to hit a ball because they said it felt comfortable leave it there because they hit 7 - 10 balls in?

Sometimes what feels comfortable in tennis is not the best thing for the persons game. Change is always uncomfortable.

When things are comfortable that is a red flag to me when I coach. I will make sure that what is comfortable is whithin reason.

kevhen
09-23-2004, 10:05 AM
Yeah, change what works and is getting results. That sounds like a real good formula.

If you are trying to make someone into a pro, then I agree, but 99% of us don't have those aspirations.

Bungalo Bill
09-23-2004, 10:14 AM
Yeah, change what works and is getting results. That sounds like a real good formula.

If you are trying to make someone into a pro, then I agree, but 99% of us don't have those aspirations.

Good, then if you dont have that aspiration then quit giving adivce on things you have no clue about.

johnthecoach
09-23-2004, 02:15 PM
BB said...Good, then if you dont have that aspiration then quit giving adivce on things you have no clue about.

Good God, this is supposed to be a forum to discuss..Well done kevhen, you are so right..this applies to 99% of us tennis players on this planet, not the 1% on the pro circuit.
I work loads with the Russians who are dominating the ladies World tennis, and I can tell you FOR A FACT, that they are all so different.
Myskina holds her backhand in a grip you normally would not allow for a beginner
Sharapova has a service grip slightly round from normal.
Remember Becker, he held the racket in a eastern forehand grip for his serve..some serve eh!
Brad gilbert says that you would never teach anyone to serve like Roddick, for his unusual takeback..not a bad serve though.
So BB, get a life pal, learn that not everyone can do the perfect thing, folk who have probs with wrists etc can be helped by " Holding the racket higher towards the throat"Folk who have hip probs can be helped by telling them not to rotate.
I do not know where you coach or where you learnt, but boy, if you ever want to really learn to help people, treat people as different, no two are the same, each has a different problem and a different reason for playing this great game.
Guys like you can, and probably have put people off tennis for good.

TopSpinner
09-23-2004, 04:57 PM
I grip it at the bottom of the handle. My pinky is wedged against the butt cap bevel (about 1/8" from the edge of the buttcap) and about 1/2" of my palm goes past the edge of the buttcap.

VTL
09-23-2004, 11:12 PM
Doing what is comfortable can be a cop out most of the time; however, as long as you're getting the results, there shouldn't be a problem

Here is my point. If a person has learned to hit an Eastern Forehand serve because it feels comfortable would you as a coach knowing the persons goals to improve leave it there because it feels comfortable? Even if they are getting the ball in the box?

If you as a coach saw a person hitting the onehanded backhand with a eastern forehand grip would you as a coach leave it there even if they are hitting most of them in and they said it felt comfortable?

If you as a coach saw someone not bending there knees to hit a ball because they said it felt comfortable leave it there because they hit 7 - 10 balls in?

Sometimes what feels comfortable in tennis is not the best thing for the persons game. Change is always uncomfortable.

When things are comfortable that is a red flag to me when I coach. I will make sure that what is comfortable is whithin reason.

Agreed. But When talking about service grips, however, there are ppl that can hit devastating, effective serves without having to hold their rackets according to the guidelines. In those cases, it would not be a copout to continue w/ their comfortable ways. You're right in all those examples tho and your point is a good one. I hate seeing people who have a desire to improve their game, but unwilling to at least try something different in fear of leaving their comfort zone.

sandro
09-23-2004, 11:22 PM
Thanks Bungalow. Now that the memory of my body it's "locked" with the new grip for groundstrokes and volleys, I'll start to practice the serve with the lower grip. I love this sport, always something to practice... :-)

spinbalz
09-27-2004, 05:13 PM
Take a look at where coria - Ferrero - Nalbandian hold their racquets for their forehand, they are all users or past users of Prince Longbodies 28" racquets, and they hold their racquets so high on the handle that it is like if they were finally swinging a std. length racquet.