PDA

View Full Version : tips for making varsity??


J.W. North Tennis91
05-15-2007, 07:51 PM
next year i really want to make the varsity team for my hs. i have good placement on my groundstrokes but i am horrible at overheads. im going to take 2 weeks of lessons during summer, is this enough? also im going to play a lot during summer also. my jv rank is 5 out of 30 and there is a big gap between me and the 1-4 jv players because they are far better than me. im really horrible at returning fast shots and thats what i guess makes those 4 players better than me. i know my chances for varsity is slim but with lots of practice and 2 weeks of lessons, will it be enough? also there is fall and winter to prepare too.

shindemac
05-15-2007, 07:58 PM
Not really, but maybe u can work on your overheads.

TENNIS_IS_FUN
05-15-2007, 07:58 PM
Wow you have 30 members on your Jv team? In my own experience, being a varsity player since my freshmen year, two weeks of summer training is not gonna be enough. I take group lessons during the summer for about 1 1/2 months, during the season, i hit 5/7 times a day (Season is about 2 months), and anytime other than that, i hit on the weekend. If you really want to upgrade to varsity, i suggest private lessons...if you can't afford them for any other reason can't get them, just hit like a mad man - go to the tennis courts every day, and when you can't practice you strokes in the air at the house.

shojun25
05-15-2007, 08:07 PM
varsity coaches looks for aggressiveness with consistency. you'll need a variety of serves. they will want you to go to net and attack. your going to need a good form, footwork, and those kind of stuff to succeed. they also want you to act determined and blah blah blah.

don't worry, you have a year (guessing that your tennis season is over) to practice. the best tip for making it into varsity is play with varsity people. this will help you game considerably because you will have a chance to know what its like in varsity level. if you don't have anyone to play with, practice your serves. if you have friends to play with, work on whatever you can (just don't ask your friend to feed you balls so you can train ____).

good luck next year and have fun.

J.W. North Tennis91
05-15-2007, 08:39 PM
varsity coaches looks for aggressiveness with consistency. you'll need a variety of serves. they will want you to go to net and attack. your going to need a good form, footwork, and those kind of stuff to succeed. they also want you to act determined and blah blah blah.

don't worry, you have a year (guessing that your tennis season is over) to practice. the best tip for making it into varsity is play with varsity people. this will help you game considerably because you will have a chance to know what its like in varsity level. if you don't have anyone to play with, practice your serves. if you have friends to play with, work on whatever you can (just don't ask your friend to feed you balls so you can train ____).

good luck next year and have fun.

lol ya i have a hitting partner and no i dont play with varsity people that much because they like to hit with other varsity people. im a sophomore next year so i want to work hard on making it, also there are 5 open spots next year for varsity since the seniors are leaving.

J.W. North Tennis91
05-15-2007, 08:41 PM
Wow you have 30 members on your Jv team? In my own experience, being a varsity player since my freshmen year, two weeks of summer training is not gonna be enough. I take group lessons during the summer for about 1 1/2 months, during the season, i hit 5/7 times a day (Season is about 2 months), and anytime other than that, i hit on the weekend. If you really want to upgrade to varsity, i suggest private lessons...if you can't afford them for any other reason can't get them, just hit like a mad man - go to the tennis courts every day, and when you can't practice you strokes in the air at the house.

ya my coach doesnt make cuts for jv but i think its really stupid because there are some players on my team that cant even hit the ball over the net more than twice in one rally.

J.W. North Tennis91
05-15-2007, 08:43 PM
i forgot to mention that i will take private lessons starting on june for about 3 weeks and group lessons for 2 weeks.

zapvor
05-15-2007, 08:58 PM
it depends on quality of lessons too. but i would say error on the too much side, and do way more than. like everyday. 3-4 hours a day. but take breaks as necssary. you dont want to get injured.

Fedace
05-15-2007, 09:15 PM
next year i really want to make the varsity team for my hs. i have good placement on my groundstrokes but i am horrible at overheads. im going to take 2 weeks of lessons during summer, is this enough? also im going to play a lot during summer also. my jv rank is 5 out of 30 and there is a big gap between me and the 1-4 jv players because they are far better than me. im really horrible at returning fast shots and thats what i guess makes those 4 players better than me. i know my chances for varsity is slim but with lots of practice and 2 weeks of lessons, will it be enough? also there is fall and winter to prepare too.

NO, 2 week lesson will not be enough unfortunately. YOu need more like a summer camp if you can afford it, something like Bolletieri summer camp. It is well worth the money, i went to one myself. As far as the fast shots go, there is so many components to it, early preparation, being able to read your opponents intensions, short backswing, keeping your eye on the ball. I have not seen you play so i am not sure which component you are not doing well?? and as far as the overhead, it is so much of a mental thing. If you serve well, your overhead should be excellent as well. they are basically a same motion. But with overhead, you have to prepare early and get your racket up and ready and use the other arm up and use it for balance, and shoulder turn is critical. The best example is Pete sampras, look at some of still pics of him getting ready for a overhead, it is basically perfect text book. and also weight should be on your back foot as you ready yourself to hit the ball and explode up into the ball from the back leg. Like i said, it is so much a mental thing, if you are confident in the shot, it is a easy shot, but if you dread hitting overhead, it will be a disaster.

J.W. North Tennis91
05-15-2007, 09:29 PM
NO, 2 week lesson will not be enough unfortunately. YOu need more like a summer camp if you can afford it, something like Bolletieri summer camp. It is well worth the money, i went to one myself. As far as the fast shots go, there is so many components to it, early preparation, being able to read your opponents intensions, short backswing, keeping your eye on the ball. I have not seen you play so i am not sure which component you are not doing well?? and as far as the overhead, it is so much of a mental thing. If you serve well, your overhead should be excellent as well. they are basically a same motion. But with overhead, you have to prepare early and get your racket up and ready and use the other arm up and use it for balance, and shoulder turn is critical. The best example is Pete sampras, look at some of still pics of him getting ready for a overhead, it is basically perfect text book. and also weight should be on your back foot as you ready yourself to hit the ball and explode up into the ball from the back leg. Like i said, it is so much a mental thing, if you are confident in the shot, it is a easy shot, but if you dread hitting overhead, it will be a disaster.

that is kind of my problem, in overheads i dont have much confidence. yes ive seen lots of videos of sampras play his one handed bh helped me a lot with my one handed bh. my best parts about my game is the placement on my bh and my down the line forehand shots. i also have good amount of power in forehand.

es-0
05-16-2007, 02:55 AM
If you can't handle their faster strokes why don't you just try hitting with them more. I did that with the better guys on my team and now I can keep up just fine and occasionally get some points off them as they blast the ball of the court.

junbumkim
05-16-2007, 07:18 AM
Not knowing the level of your team, it's a bit difficult to say..
Usually at the lower end of varsity singles, being consistent is important.

Hitting a lot of tennis balls is important, but you also have to be fit.

If you can't find hitting partner who's willing to work with you or want to do something outside private lessons, I suggest hitting against walls.

It's one of the best alternative ways to work on your weakness. You learn to take your racket back fast, learn to watch the ball. You can consistently hit one shot over and over again. You can work on pretty much everything except serve.

My overhand was very bad as well. And I even practiced my overhand against the wall. In the beginning I was only able to hit 2~3 in a row, after sometime, I could hit 10~20 in a row easily.

Hitting against wall, is underrated...

Pusher
05-16-2007, 07:51 AM
next year i really want to make the varsity team for my hs. i have good placement on my groundstrokes but i am horrible at overheads. im going to take 2 weeks of lessons during summer, is this enough? also im going to play a lot during summer also. my jv rank is 5 out of 30 and there is a big gap between me and the 1-4 jv players because they are far better than me. im really horrible at returning fast shots and thats what i guess makes those 4 players better than me. i know my chances for varsity is slim but with lots of practice and 2 weeks of lessons, will it be enough? also there is fall and winter to prepare too.

Its very difficult to outwork other serious players. But you can work smarter.

Obviously you must find a good hitting partner. If one of the better players will not hit with you then you may have to pay someone. A good choice over the summer would be a college player-they're cheaper and they can teach you most all you need to know for HS competetion. Being around better players will help you get better.

Put as much time into conditioning as you do practicing tennis. Most juniors ignore conditioning and that can give you an edge. Being fit improves your footwork, your balance, your movement and allows you to play at your best for longer periods of time. I think you will be surprised at how much good fitness will improve your game. Don't ignore the value of good nutrition.

Overheads may be the easiest shot in tennis but like all other strokes you have to practice. Again, fitness will improve an overhead because you are less tempted to take shortcuts, i.e. not running back to get into position, etc.

Good luck.

richw76
05-16-2007, 09:11 AM
Since you are a sophmore in highschool I don't know how mobile you are but you need to find a good coach, and or a local park that alot of hitters go to. Once/If you are "good enough" you'll have no problem finding people to hit with. I had a similar problem. I went to a relatively small private school with a very good tennis team where everyone had their own coaches and people showed up for the once a week mandatory practice (unless something more important came up ;-) ) and matches.

I ended up finding a local YMCA that had a great juniors program. After private school tuition my parents didn't have much left over so my coach reduced the rates and I learned to restring rackets to make up the difference. Great guy. That said a good juniors program maybe the only place you'll see a consistant high enough level to become competitive.

oh and most likely with the not getting balls back with lots of pace. Your not getting ready early enough. It's because you can get away with it. your probably waiting to rotate your shoulders etc. until ball is about to bounce usually this is "ok" although you are and probably look very rushed - if you start preparing earlier your rallies with "bad people", service return, OH... everything will probably improve.

J.W. North Tennis91
05-16-2007, 05:04 PM
Since you are a sophmore in highschool I don't know how mobile you are but you need to find a good coach, and or a local park that alot of hitters go to. Once/If you are "good enough" you'll have no problem finding people to hit with. I had a similar problem. I went to a relatively small private school with a very good tennis team where everyone had their own coaches and people showed up for the once a week mandatory practice (unless something more important came up ;-) ) and matches.

I ended up finding a local YMCA that had a great juniors program. After private school tuition my parents didn't have much left over so my coach reduced the rates and I learned to restring rackets to make up the difference. Great guy. That said a good juniors program maybe the only place you'll see a consistant high enough level to become competitive.

oh and most likely with the not getting balls back with lots of pace. Your not getting ready early enough. It's because you can get away with it. your probably waiting to rotate your shoulders etc. until ball is about to bounce usually this is "ok" although you are and probably look very rushed - if you start preparing earlier your rallies with "bad people", service return, OH... everything will probably improve.


ya i tend to rally with the sucky players lol and about 2 jv's higher than me. i will start to try to rally more with the varsity players. oh and im a freshman, im going to be a sophomore next year and i want that to be my varsity year. i came to my hs at a horrible time because everybody found out that our coach doesnt make cuts for jv so there is more competition now. i dont have a problem returning balls with lots of top spin its just power that really makes my groundies horrible.

Vision84
05-16-2007, 05:31 PM
30 kids on JV??? You better have a lot of courts.

Well I reccomend private lessons more than anything else. Get some private lessons mixed in with group lessons. In private lessons you can learn how to do it and in group lessons you can practice it with a coach there to ensure you are doing it right.

FEDEX1
05-16-2007, 05:38 PM
im in a similiar situation i am a freshman but i am #1 JV and theres 4 open spots so i guess im guaranteed like 3rd singles or 1st dubs so it is different. But i dont think 2 weeks is enough. I am going to be playing every week and goig to 3 camps at my club+a coach to help

richw76
05-17-2007, 07:13 AM
i dont have a problem returning balls with lots of top spin its just power that really makes my groundies horrible.

yep that's what I was saying. When you hit a "hard/power ball" Everything is that same. You look at the ball the same. Your foot work is the same. Your swing is the same. The only difference is you need to be prepared sooner. as soon as you see the ball leaving your opponents racket and you know which side the ball is going to you should be turning your shoulders, getting the racket back.

If a guy just blast me with bombs but they are right back to me I could care less since I can hit those back all day long. ;-)

When you hit with people worse than you some people get into two terrible habits

1. Looking at how beautiful your winner was. The problem is when you play better people unless you're within a foot of the lines or so you'll probably have to hit the ball at least one more time. If they can get to the ball ok they may hit a winner off you.

2. Not preparing. When you play people that don't hit deep heavy balls you get lazy and don't get your racket back early. When you play good people you are cramped and or rushed and everything goes to crap since you don't have enough time.

---of course I could be wrong, I've never seen you play. :-)

J.W. North Tennis91
05-17-2007, 06:51 PM
yep that's what I was saying. When you hit a "hard/power ball" Everything is that same. You look at the ball the same. Your foot work is the same. Your swing is the same. The only difference is you need to be prepared sooner. as soon as you see the ball leaving your opponents racket and you know which side the ball is going to you should be turning your shoulders, getting the racket back.

If a guy just blast me with bombs but they are right back to me I could care less since I can hit those back all day long. ;-)

When you hit with people worse than you some people get into two terrible habits

1. Looking at how beautiful your winner was. The problem is when you play better people unless you're within a foot of the lines or so you'll probably have to hit the ball at least one more time. If they can get to the ball ok they may hit a winner off you.

2. Not preparing. When you play people that don't hit deep heavy balls you get lazy and don't get your racket back early. When you play good people you are cramped and or rushed and everything goes to crap since you don't have enough time.

---of course I could be wrong, I've never seen you play. :-)


lol ya ur right, i hit tons of winners on them and i dont even have to use any footwork to do it :D seriously though, i really do need to practice with better people :(

Fedace
05-17-2007, 07:10 PM
that is kind of my problem, in overheads i dont have much confidence. yes ive seen lots of videos of sampras play his one handed bh helped me a lot with my one handed bh. my best parts about my game is the placement on my bh and my down the line forehand shots. i also have good amount of power in forehand.

If overhead only one that is your problem, you are in luck, Overhead is one of the shots that is easier to fix. It is all about confidence and preparation. When the ball goes up, say to yourself, Oh i love this, i am going to rip this one and prepare early with shoulder turn and make up your mind early where you are going to hit the ball and don't change your mind no matter what your opponent does. and set up and rip it.

GS Dubs
05-18-2007, 09:04 AM
1. If you can take lessons, go for it.

2. Work on your serves, work on your serve returns, the more serves you can get in the more points you get into. Same with serve returns.

3. Work on your volleys, try to play as many games of doubles as possible. In Ohio, we play 3 singles and 2 doubles. Work on your doubles game as well. High 1st serve % is key.

4. Go to the library, get some books on tennis. Become a student of the game.

5. Get fit, the posters who talked about that are dead on, The better shape you are in, the footwork improves, which is the core of tennis.

benperet
05-18-2007, 10:18 AM
There is lots of advice about getting fit. I'll just share something that has helped me quite a bit. Plyometrics.

There is tons of info about them plastered on the internet.

Basically I take a box about 1 foot high and jump on it sideways and then jump off the other side and bounce on and off to work on the lateral movement. It's quite a workout.

Then I get a 2-3" box and jump straight up on that one and lower yourself down with your knees, alternating feet on the way down.

You can really make up whatever form of these exercises, using one leg or doing long jumps onto the box, but the important part is to vary it up and do them about 2 times a week.

I notice after just a little while how springy my fast twitch muscles are and it helps me run down balls and be in position. Great conditioning for the tennis court or any sport really.

spadesss
05-18-2007, 10:35 AM
in hs school (and low college) competition, i think its all about who makes the less mistakes/unforce errors. you may not have the flash but if you keep the ball in, most likely, you will win the point.
many players go for the kill after trading groundies 3 times.
next time you watch a match, size up the #2,#3, and #4 guy in the same team. usually the #2 guy doens't have much flash or hit that awesome winners. what he does is keep the ball in a few more times instead of going for winners. the #3 & #4 guy is ready to whip the ball and go for winners early on.

if OH is your problem, you are doing well and i think you will win many matches. the rest is just gaining experience. you may lose games early on due to inexperience and nerve but hopefully, you will learn from it.

z-money
05-18-2007, 10:41 AM
listen dude! You need lessons, and you need to play against better players a lot, and you need a lot of practice in general! 2 weeks? make it 5 of constant work. returning fast shots - that is do to slow reaction time. and probably a slow swing from you. you need to see that ball well and get your timing to improve if your going to raise your game. it can be done but its up to you on how hard you want to work. if you dont work hard you wont make it, its that simple

J.W. North Tennis91
05-18-2007, 07:10 PM
in hs school (and low college) competition, i think its all about who makes the less mistakes/unforce errors. you may not have the flash but if you keep the ball in, most likely, you will win the point.
many players go for the kill after trading groundies 3 times.
next time you watch a match, size up the #2,#3, and #4 guy in the same team. usually the #2 guy doens't have much flash or hit that awesome winners. what he does is keep the ball in a few more times instead of going for winners. the #3 & #4 guy is ready to whip the ball and go for winners early on.

if OH is your problem, you are doing well and i think you will win many matches. the rest is just gaining experience. you may lose games early on due to inexperience and nerve but hopefully, you will learn from it.

lol in matches i get sooo nervous, i think thats why i never played my 100 % in matches. i also think my problem is that i dont have much match experience because i rally way too much and play less matches.

tennispr()
05-20-2007, 08:55 AM
practice practice practice, and about the playing bad in matches u will get better by playing more matches =D

thejackal
05-20-2007, 09:01 AM
play a lot of tiebreaks against different types of opponents. ususally during tryouts the coach will have you play tiebreaks or at least shorter matches to determine ur seeding.

J.W. North Tennis91
05-20-2007, 05:02 PM
play a lot of tiebreaks against different types of opponents. ususally during tryouts the coach will have you play tiebreaks or at least shorter matches to determine ur seeding.

ya my coach makes us play lots of tiebreaks instead of actual sets.