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Potito
05-17-2007, 03:00 AM
I have some problems on holding my double bend structure during contact. When I hit well I feel that I'm keeping elbow in and I'm pushing in front whit him, and my hand remains almost over racquet head at impact.
Rather when I swing with racquet head, my hand rotate and racquet head lead the stroke. It seems to me that when I bring my palm toward right side at contact, I mantain double bend and I can hit through the ball.
Do you have any tips for don't rotate hand at impact and keep racquet head horizontal until after contact?

Jonnyf
05-17-2007, 03:14 AM
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=133121

Read tricky's comment on the training aid the "Leverage Band" designed to get the user into the double bend

Potito
05-17-2007, 03:27 AM
Thank you, very good post! But without device there are some tips, more besed on feeling, for improve and don't breaking double bend at contact?

Jonnyf
05-17-2007, 03:48 AM
Thank you, very good post! But without device there are some tips, more besed on feeling, for improve and don't breaking double bend at contact?


I'm sorry I couldn't help you there, i'm not ever sure if i obtain double bend on my forehand hence the purchase of the band

tricky
05-17-2007, 02:12 PM
But without device there are some tips, more besed on feeling, for improve and don't breaking double bend at contact?

Some things that help me:

1) Swing is shoulder-centric. So, lead the backswing with shoulder, and initiate the forward swing with shoulder and elbow tuck.

2) Slight forward tip of racquet in backswing. This makes sure the shoulder rotation is correct.

3) Forward swing is kinda like a right hook punch. Basically you "hook" toward your finish, and your swing plane is slightly diagonal.

4) To get a more "parallel" racquet, lower the finish a little. Say around armpit or chest level.

5) In terms of driving into the ball, that's basically function of the feet. Don't try to "arm" this. If you shift from backfoot to front, you'll automatically drive into ball.

JCo872
05-17-2007, 03:36 PM
I have some problems on holding my double bend structure during contact. When I hit well I feel that I'm keeping elbow in and I'm pushing in front whit him, and my hand remains almost over racquet head at impact.
Rather when I swing with racquet head, my hand rotate and racquet head lead the stroke. It seems to me that when I bring my palm toward right side at contact, I mantain double bend and I can hit through the ball.
Do you have any tips for don't rotate hand at impact and keep racquet head horizontal until after contact?

You've got to lift! Check it out here:
http://www.hi-techtennis.com/forehand/topspin.php

Potito
05-18-2007, 07:35 AM
Thank you Tricky and Jeff, great suggestions! It seems to me that I make a good shot when I feel that I "launch" racquet head toward right side, beginning with elbow tucked in. In this way I don't swing circularly but I succed to push through the hitting zone by the inside, near the body. So I push in a straight line with elbow that finish in front with good extension. Is wrong or correct this feeling, almost a "launch outside"? Thanks a lot for your help.

tricky
05-18-2007, 12:27 PM
Yeah, I think the idea is to push through the line with your shoulder, while your racquet head is trailing your arm. The key to that is the elbow. The elbow tuck itself is a movement done with both shoulder and elbow. The shoulder starts to turn, and the elbow forces the wrist to lay back further, thereby increasing distance between racquet and shoulder without opening up the elbow angle.

I think one helpful idea initially is to slow down the arm a little. By doing this, this accomplish two things:

1) It forces you to use your body for power and spin. Sit and lift into ball.

2) It helps you see the arm as a way to means to make clean contact with the ball. You also avoid arming or "catching" the ball with the racquet.

3) Helps you relax your grip and concentrate on good contact. You then accept that the wrap-around will naturally happen because your wrist is laid back and your shoulder is swinging away.

Potito
05-19-2007, 04:30 AM
The key to that is the elbow. The elbow tuck itself is a movement done with both shoulder and elbow. The shoulder starts to turn, and the elbow forces the wrist to lay back further, thereby increasing distance between racquet and shoulder without opening up the elbow angle.


Excellent analysis Tricky! It's just like that, my "launch" feeling has its foundation in the elbow motion and position. If I drive my forehand with elbow that remains with closed angle and in the same time I push with it (and the shoulder) in hitting zone, I hit a good stroke, with power and control.