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saltyzoo
09-22-2004, 12:48 PM
I've had a bad case of carpal tunnel for several years. It's what got me out of the sport a few years ago. I just started back up and the carpal has gotten much worse already.

Can anybody share their experiences with carpal?

kevhen
09-23-2004, 11:32 AM
Yes, when I first started playing tennis seriously about 10 years ago, I would type at work all day and then play tennis all night after night and started to get carpal tunnel problems. I adjusted my chair to sit higher at work which helped alot, and cut back on the tennis, not playing every night, which also helped. I think some of my problem was from squeezing the racquet so hard and not letting up ever and just over using my wrists. I had to cut down on video games too because of my wrists. I haven't had carpal tunnel problems since then, but it was scary and painful and annoying.

sinoslav
09-26-2004, 09:38 AM
Had very minor touches with it, but nothing serious. I can recommend WEIGHT TRAINING! Things like pull-ups and lateral raises. These give you general upper body strength but also tend to strengthen the forearm flexors which I think can reduce the burden on the writs. Plus yoga, some of the major stretches are very good for the upper arms.

Marius_Hancu
11-05-2004, 04:48 AM
I've had a bad case of carpal tunnel for several years. It's what got me out of the sport a few years ago. I just started back up and the carpal has gotten much worse already.

Can anybody share their experiences with carpal?

In my case (heavy PC user) I had to change the mouse from the right to my left hand. It helped the problem got away. I am still playing tennis with my right hand, though, I'm no Sharapova:-))

It was complicated in my case by having TE (tennis elbow) at the same time. To make things short, everything was trigerred by neglecting my flexibility and strength conditioning for several years. When the muscles get weak, stress is transmitted to a much larger extent to the tendons, which are much less flexible and things get painful.

I have done lots of arm and upper body flexibility and strength since then and now I am free of any pain, knock on wood.

Check:
on RSI (Repetitive Stress Syndrome):
http://www.amara.com/aboutme/rsi.html
http://www.tifaq.com/

Also, my posting here:
Great fitness sites
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=33800
will give you lots of links on conditioning.

saltyzoo
11-05-2004, 04:53 AM
Thanks for the info. I switched to a mini-mouse which has pretty much solved my issues at the desk.

Even more surprising and encouraging is that since I posted this my carpal has improved with playing tennis 3 to 4 times a week. :)

Marius_Hancu
11-05-2004, 05:00 AM
Thanks for the info. I switched to a mini-mouse which has pretty much solved my issues at the desk.

Yes, the arm is very sensitive to the type of mouse. I switched to a lighter touch MS Intellimouse, helped too.

kevhen
11-05-2004, 12:04 PM
Yes, I have my mouse on the left side at work too and made that switch years ago due to carpal in the right wrist.

vin
11-06-2004, 05:11 AM
Hey Greg,

Here's some good reading for you:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1572242507/qid=1099749603/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_b_2_1/103-7001441-1418202

There's many references in this book that describe various muscles that could be knotted up and causing carpel tunnel symptoms along with how to loosen up the muscles and resolve the pain. I swear by this book as I've gotten a lot of mileage out of it.

Marius_Hancu
11-06-2004, 12:53 PM
There's many references in this book that describe various muscles that could be knotted up and causing carpel tunnel symptoms along with how to loosen up the muscles and resolve the pain..

Hi, Vin:

Are the techniques in this book something of an automassage?

Are you using it after a training session to say relieve pain in quads or hams? (talking about them because this is where I might have pain after a lifting session, after which I didn't stretch well enough)

And are they activating the same points talked about in acupuncture?

Definitely interesting.

saltyzoo
11-06-2004, 12:56 PM
That is cool Vin, I'll pick that up.

PS> Did you get your package?

vin
11-06-2004, 02:07 PM
Marius,

It is called trigger point therapy and it's basically self administered deep tissue massage. Muscle knots can cause all kinds of problems. They keep parts of the affected muscle constantly contracted and if left untreated, this will cause a pull on nearby joints creating imbalances, instability, real tendonitis, etc, etc. This can also cause new trigger points in other areas.

The tricky part about trigger points is that they often result in referred pain, which means that the pain is not in the same spot as the trigger point. The book I referenced tells you where to look for the trigger point based on the location of the pain.

It's not always easy to find the trigger point, but once you do, you'll be sure about it because it hurts like hell when you press on it hard. Once you've found it, you massage it really hard (very painful) a bunch of times throughout the day for a few days and that should take care of it. The massaging helps break up the knot or trigger point and restores the flexibility of the affected area.

For almost every trigger point that the author discusses, he has a story to go with it about someone who's been misdiagnosed and wasted a lot of time doing the rounds with doctors and rehab. It seems that many doctors don't know about or don't want to embrace something as simple as muscle knots. Seems rediculous, doesn't it? The author has a pretty amazing story to tell himself.

It's easy to blow this off as some kind of weird or quacky methodology, but it's not. I've proven to myself many times that it works. One of those times I was having some serious shoulder and arm pain and was about to head to a doctor. It turned out to be a trigger point in my tricept. I stumbled on trigger point therapy through one of the weightlifting authors that I like and didn't really pay much attention to it myself until I decided to try it out. For $20 and a few hours of reading, there's really not much to lose in checking it out.

vin
11-06-2004, 02:12 PM
Greg,

Yes, I got it. Thanks for ordering it.

The life span of these bulbs is supposed to be a year. I'm somewhere near 14 months with my current bulb and my Achilles is suddenly showing some mild ich. I guess that's another testament to UV and also the accuracy of the bulbs lifespan. I'm going down to replace it right now.

I've been getting a bit more microalgae than usual also. I certainly wouldn't mind if replacing the bulb took care of that too. :)

Good luck with your wrist.

Marius_Hancu
11-06-2004, 03:15 PM
It is called trigger point therapy and it's basically self administered deep tissue massage. Muscle knots can cause all kinds of problems. They keep parts of the affected muscle constantly contracted and if left untreated, this will cause a pull on nearby joints creating imbalances, instability, real tendonitis, etc, etc. This can also cause new trigger points in other areas..

Thanks, Vin.

Wonder if it's related to the deep tissue massage which is administered by expert massage specialists in case of muscle tears/ruptures. That hurts a lot too ...

Check 1st & 2nd level tears in the following. I looked into it when reading of Federer's recent injury ...

-----------
http://www.sportsdoctor.com/articles/muscle.html

There are three degrees of muscle ruptures. A first-degree strain
involves less than 5 percent of the muscle. You may notice only mild
pain and not lose much strength or range of motion. We sometimes refer
to these mild tears as pulled muscles.

A second-degree tear is a greater rupture that stops short of a complete
tear. Any contraction of the torn muscle will cause pain. With either a
first- or second-degree tear, you may feel a defect of the muscle - a
bump or an indentation - at the site of the most pain. You should be
able to partially contract the muscle, but you may not be able to walk
or stand without pain or a limp.

A third-degree rupture is a complete tear across the width of the
muscle. You will be unable to contract the muscle. This is what happens
when someone suddenly drops while sprinting. The torn end of the muscle
may ball up and form a large lump under the skin, and a great deal of
internal bleeding occurs. Severely torn muscles may require surgery to
heal properly.
----------

Marius_Hancu
11-06-2004, 03:37 PM
Replying my own question:

>Wonder if it's related to the deep tissue massage which is administered by expert massage specialists in case of muscle tears/ruptures. That hurts a lot too ...

I think I found that the trigger points involve neurological components, which are not present that much perhaps in case of tears/ruptures:

http://www.maxsportsmag.com/strengthendurance/issue21/21se2.htm
---
the trigger points are a neurological memory that can remain in a muscle indefinitely.
---

vin
11-06-2004, 03:46 PM
Marius,

In the book, the author discusses that trigger point therapy is important for injury recovery. I believe for both truamatic injuries as well as minor muscle tears.

saltyzoo
12-13-2004, 02:59 PM
Well, it's been a month and so far tennis has improved my carpal. :D

Marius_Hancu
12-13-2004, 03:47 PM
Well, it's been a month and so far tennis has improved my carpal. :D

very good, but are you doing any flexibility and conditioning exercises too?

Ronaldo
12-13-2004, 05:52 PM
Marius, wassup w/Sharapova and her left hand?

Marius_Hancu
12-13-2004, 07:59 PM
Marius, wassup w/Sharapova and her left hand?

Do you mean she's ambidextrous, or something else?
Didn't hear anything in terms of injuries.