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Jayzzz
09-22-2004, 06:17 PM
I do a powerlifting routine twice a week. If I play tennis for 1.5-2 hours 3-4 times a week (on off days from the weights) will this affect my gains any? I know that tennis is not aerobic so it's not like jogging for 1.5 hours. Of anything the lifting should help in my explosiveness and power on serves and groundies.

PusherMan
09-22-2004, 07:27 PM
If your intention is to get bigger, as in buff, the extra calories burned in your tennis workout may effect this process negatively. You will need to increase your calorie and protein intake if you wish to add mass. A lot also just depends on your body type and metabolism.

I really wouldn't worry about it too much. You don't plan on ditching tennis to get bigger, do ya? I certainly hope not. Do both and your overall fitness will still be better than the average bear's.

Jayzzz
09-23-2004, 09:28 AM
If your intention is to get bigger, as in buff, the extra calories burned in your tennis workout may effect this process negatively. You will need to increase your calorie and protein intake if you wish to add mass. A lot also just depends on your body type and metabolism.

I really wouldn't worry about it too much. You don't plan on ditching tennis to get bigger, do ya? I certainly hope not. Do both and your overall fitness will still be better than the average bear's.

Nahh I definately don't want to ditch tennis for two reasons, 1.) it's incredible fun! and 2.) my heart gets a good workout, even if it isn't aerobic. It's hard enough for me to do any form of cardio. Jogging, or running on a treadmill is boring. With tennis I can get my heart rate up and keep my heart more healthy then if I just lift weights.

Good point about burning the calories though. I'll have to increase protien intake and cals, preferable early in the day though, I don't want to balloon up! :)

netman
09-23-2004, 05:36 PM
See "Pollution of body building" thread below for some good info.

Marius_Hancu
11-05-2004, 05:56 AM
I do a powerlifting routine twice a week. If I play tennis for 1.5-2 hours 3-4 times a week (on off days from the weights) will this affect my gains any? I know that tennis is not aerobic so it's not like jogging for 1.5 hours. Of anything the lifting should help in my explosiveness and power on serves and groundies.

If you do leg work, don't do it in the last 2-3 days before an important match or tournament. If you really work very hard on your legs, I'd suggest don't do it more than once a week, twice is OK for the upper body. Recovery is very important in the building of muscle too.

End your strength sessions with Pilates or Yoga for flexibility, otherwise you might get muscle bound.

Check my posting here:
Great fitness sites
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/viewtopic.php?t=23127
I will help I am sure.

Also, do lots of sprinting. It will help considerably your tennis.

vin
11-06-2004, 06:24 AM
Jayzzz,

I've been lifting weights for about 8 years and just got back into tennis last year. I play almost every day and for me tennis certainly makes progress more difficult with weightlifting. As I'm sure you know, eating and sleeping are majorly important for weightlifting because it's during recovery that the muscle actually rebuilds to get stronger. With tennis, eating and sleeping are even more important because your burning a lot more of your calories and putting a lot more stress on your recovery system.

I'm not sure what your strength goals are, but you might have to lower them a bit in light of tennis. I lift weights not just for tennis, but as an interest in it's own, so I know it's a hard sacrafice, but as you said, tennis is a great sport.

And it's good to see you're only working out 2x per week. Assuming you're somewhat advanced, that's a great number, especially with the tennis you're playing. And I hope you're doing squats! :)

Oh yeah, I'm sure you know about the importance of flexibility as well (for both activities). Marius' suggestion to do Yoga is a good one. I've never tried Pilates, but Yoga has greatly helped my flexibility and also helps to maintain a balance so that your entire body is generally flexible. If you have your own stretching routine that you do over and over, chances are that you're missing some areas and developing an imbalance. If you're like me and don't care for all the spiritual stuff that sometimes comes with Yoga, buy a DVD and do it at home. I have this one and it's good enough for me. http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00006JXWC/qid%3D1099751014/sr%3D11-1/ref%3Dsr%5F11%5F1/103-7001441-1418202#product-details

Good luck,
Vin

degreefanlindi
11-06-2004, 06:42 AM
I was always told not to lift weights OVER my head or above my shoulder for tennis training..because these muscles do not need to be developed. Arm strength isn't required as much as balance, leg strength and back muscles.
However, I find it helpful to build some arm strength and continue to work my muscles...it doesn't really affect my playing. (good or bad)

vin
11-06-2004, 07:24 AM
I was always told not to lift weights OVER my head or above my shoulder for tennis training..because these muscles do not need to be developed. Arm strength isn't required as much as balance, leg strength and back muscles.
However, I find it helpful to build some arm strength and continue to work my muscles...it doesn't really affect my playing. (good or bad)

Well, the shoulder does take a lot of abuse from tennis, but I think the serious but careful weightlifter can still do overhead press along with tennis. I think the big scare here is impingement and flexibility loss. The best way to execute the over head press is in front of your head and with the back of the bench slightly inclined. The result is that you're not 'lifting over head' as much. Flexibility in my opinion is a non issue because if you're stretching they way you should be, bigger and stronger shoulders will not reduce flexibility.

If you're going to worry about your shoulders with respect to tennis and weightlifting, worry about the bench press. Yes, the overrated exercise that everyone loves. Benching puts a lot of stress on your rotator cuff, which also gets a lot of stress from tennis. They are small muscles and if you tear one of them, you won't be a happy camper.

I've had my share of shoulder problems, but have never had an issue with doing overhead press. However, I'm currently starting a new routine and instead of flat bench and overhead press, I think I am going to do incline bench press with dumbells and maybe some lateral raises. The incline press stresses the rotator cuff less than flat bench and naturally promotes the downward retracted position that your shoulders should be in during the movement. And the dumbells allow for a more natural path of motion. With the amount of tennis I'm playing (almost every day), and the way I play (I like to hit hard), I decided to play it safe and give my shoulders a break in my weightlifting routine.

Marius_Hancu
11-06-2004, 10:58 AM
I've had my share of shoulder problems, but have never had an issue with doing overhead press. However, I'm currently starting a new routine and instead of flat bench and overhead press, I think I am going to do incline bench press with dumbells and maybe some lateral raises.

I'm always doing dumbells and generally free weights, beside the machines or presses with the bar, because I feel they promote the flexibility. Also, pulleys are great for the same reason. I am working with them for my shoulders and pecs.

degreefanlindi
11-09-2004, 09:21 AM
Vin, thanks for the pointers and feedback on overhead presses and shoulder issues relating to tennis. I never thought about the downsides to benchpressing...always just assumed the muscles being used were more in the elbows. I guess I can see where you would benefit most from in front of the body presses. Thanks.
How do these routines affect the neck muscles? Sometimes, I feel as if my technique is wrong and I am not strengthening these muscles, but actually the opposite. What advice do you have...as it relates to neck positioning while lifting?

vin
11-09-2004, 12:01 PM
What advice do you have...as it relates to neck positioning while lifting?

My neck has gotten bigger from weight lifting without doing anything specific to cause it. I'm not exactly sure why my neck got bigger without working it directly, but I do know that this is common.

I would say just keep your neck in a neutral and comfortable position. If you're doing weird things with your neck, you're probably using too much weight.

Where you look during an exercise, which will influence your head and neck position, can be dependent on the exercise you're doing. For example, when doing squats or deadlifts, you want to look straight ahead. For chin ups, you want to look up at the ceiling. I believe the reasons for these recommnedations is how they influence the positioning of your back.

The following book is a great reference for safe exercise technique:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/9963616097/qid=1100030074/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-6543682-7249634?v=glance&s=books

If you really want a bigger neck, do specific neck exercises instead of worrying about your neck while doing other exercises. Strengthening your neck can help to reduce injuries like whiplash, but you have to be careful and you don't want to use too much weight. If you want more info, let me know.