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pagepa
09-23-2004, 08:59 AM
Can anyone tell me the typical daily and weekly maintenance for the hydro-court clay court system. From what I understand, they require less maintenance than traditional Har-tru courts, but how much less? Don't they still require daily dragging, periodic addition of top dressing, etc? Any help would be appreciated.

NoBadMojo
09-23-2004, 08:41 PM
i'll take a stab at this since nobody else has jumped in. the hydro court waters from underneath up right? so that would give you a more efficient use of water i would think. har tru should be dragged before every hitting session and the lines swept. yes top dressing is required periodically, the courts should be scarified periodically as well, and the courts need rolled alot especially at the beginning of the season if there is a a season where the courts are. i am sure this court is far more expensive than having the conventional watering system and have no idea what the payback time of the extra investment would be.

David Pavlich
09-25-2004, 06:18 PM
The club to which I belong has hydro-rubico courts. They require just as much maintenance as surface sprayed courts just like Ed explained. However, the courts never dry out and are not affected by wind the way a neglected surface spray court can be.

The negative side is that someone has to pay attention when a big rain blows in. Because the water seeps into the courts at regular intervals, a heavy rain will turn the courts into a swamp if someone doesn't run out to the courts and shut off the water.

David

dandz
05-03-2010, 10:59 PM
why do these hydro courts get so hard and slippery?

jhp49
05-05-2010, 02:08 PM
We have hydro-courts at our club. They are great in spring, summer, and fall. No down time for watering. However in the winter they freeze quicker and stay frozen longer than other soft courts in the area. In mild winters they average 2-3 weeks of frozen time. In a hard winter like our last one they were unplayable for about 2 months. We have 9 hydro-courts and 8 hard courts at our facility. It's located in Georgia.

owtdoorguy
07-14-2011, 08:36 AM
We have hydro-courts at our club. They are great in spring, summer, and fall. No down time for watering. However in the winter they freeze quicker and stay frozen longer than other soft courts in the area. In mild winters they average 2-3 weeks of frozen time. In a hard winter like our last one they were unplayable for about 2 months. We have 9 hydro-courts and 8 hard courts at our facility. It's located in Georgia.

Where is your facility located in reference to Atlanta?
Thanks

floridatennisdude
02-09-2012, 09:38 AM
We have hydro-courts at our club. They are great in spring, summer, and fall. No down time for watering. However in the winter they freeze quicker and stay frozen longer than other soft courts in the area. In mild winters they average 2-3 weeks of frozen time. In a hard winter like our last one they were unplayable for about 2 months. We have 9 hydro-courts and 8 hard courts at our facility. It's located in Georgia.

I was searching for solutions to a clay court problem we are having at our club in Florida. Any expert, feel free to jump in with any recommendations and links to websites that might offer a solution.

We completely tore up and replaced our old har-tru courts with a hydro system 7 months ago. We don't have many freezes here, maybe 2 or 3 per year total where it gets below freezing. However, in our first winter which has been very mild...our courts are just terrible.

We have top dressing being replenished next month, but when people play...the tennis balls become damp and turn clay colored green within the first few games. The courts are consistently wet and this causes the ball dis colorization which makes night play extremely difficult. And, when they are this wet, we are getting chunks of clay taken out from typical play...sliding, cutting, etc.

We have brought this to the club directors attention and he seems to think the problem is the top dressing. We all tend to think there is an issue with over watering that isn't being looked into enough. Any thoughts out there?

mikeler
02-09-2012, 11:04 AM
I was searching for solutions to a clay court problem we are having at our club in Florida. Any expert, feel free to jump in with any recommendations and links to websites that might offer a solution.

We completely tore up and replaced our old har-tru courts with a hydro system 7 months ago. We don't have many freezes here, maybe 2 or 3 per year total where it gets below freezing. However, in our first winter which has been very mild...our courts are just terrible.

We have top dressing being replenished next month, but when people play...the tennis balls become damp and turn clay colored green within the first few games. The courts are consistently wet and this causes the ball dis colorization which makes night play extremely difficult. And, when they are this wet, we are getting chunks of clay taken out from typical play...sliding, cutting, etc.

We have brought this to the club directors attention and he seems to think the problem is the top dressing. We all tend to think there is an issue with over watering that isn't being looked into enough. Any thoughts out there?


My club just got some cheaper clay put down and the clay has consistently been wet for months now. The new clay just does not need as much water. I know they are overwatering them because we shut off 1 court without them knowing for 24 hours and it was dusty dry the next day.

After playing at this club for 5 years now, I can say if I were building a club that I would not water from below. Some courts get weird streaks and others just are consistently flooded. I'd rather have above ground watering and add water at night and during slow times of the day (typically afternoons). At my hypothetical club, I'd also add some sort of rain gauge to not water when there is precipitation.

floridatennisdude
02-09-2012, 12:28 PM
My club just got some cheaper clay put down and the clay has consistently been wet for months now. The new clay just does not need as much water. I know they are overwatering them because we shut off 1 court without them knowing for 24 hours and it was dusty dry the next day.

After playing at this club for 5 years now, I can say if I were building a club that I would not water from below. Some courts get weird streaks and others just are consistently flooded. I'd rather have above ground watering and add water at night and during slow times of the day (typically afternoons). At my hypothetical club, I'd also add some sort of rain gauge to not water when there is precipitation.

Do you know if there is a way that you can adjust the moisture level? For example, if not a rain sensor, some sort of mechanism that can control how much water is going into the clay...other than just breaking in & turning the water off?

What town are you in?

scotus
02-09-2012, 01:15 PM
Just regular garden sprinklers (above-ground) sometimes get clogged or break and need replacement.

I would think under-ground sprinkler systems would be much tougher to maintain, and if and when you do have a problem, how would you know exactly where the problem is without digging up the whole system?

I apologize for speaking without any knowledge at all about the clay court watering system.

mikeler
02-09-2012, 05:09 PM
Just regular garden sprinklers (above-ground) sometimes get clogged or break and need replacement.

I would think under-ground sprinkler systems would be much tougher to maintain, and if and when you do have a problem, how would you know exactly where the problem is without digging up the whole system?

I apologize for speaking without any knowledge at all about the clay court watering system.


Nope, you nailed it.

mikeler
02-09-2012, 05:10 PM
Do you know if there is a way that you can adjust the moisture level? For example, if not a rain sensor, some sort of mechanism that can control how much water is going into the clay...other than just breaking in & turning the water off?

What town are you in?


I play in Orlando.

floridatennisdude
02-10-2012, 02:33 AM
Do you know if there is a way that you can adjust the moisture level? For example, if not a rain sensor, some sort of mechanism that can control how much water is going into the clay...other than just breaking in & turning the water off?

What town are you in?

Anybody know if a gauge or anything exists to measure and or adjust water level?

I would think so since my home irrigation system has a rain sensor.

scotus
02-12-2012, 02:00 PM
I have played recently on a green clay court in California (I don't know the exact type of clay).

It was slippery all right, but I found it odd that the comfort you feel on red clay or mere dirt court just wasn't there.

I'd say it was only a tad more comfortable than a hard court.

Is this typical of all green clay courts?

dParis
02-13-2012, 11:24 AM
I have played recently on a green clay court in California (I don't know the exact type of clay).

It was slippery all right, but I found it odd that the comfort you feel on red clay or mere dirt court just wasn't there.

I'd say it was only a tad more comfortable than a hard court.

Is this typical of all green clay courts?
The first time I played at a club with Har-Tru courts, I was impressed with the comfort and playing hours with no ill effects at the time or the next day. They replaced the Har-Tru courts with Claytec courts (synthetic membrane with har-tru dressing on top) and while I absolutely love how they play, and comfort is better than hard courts, it is not as comfortable as the old Har-Tru.

scotus
02-15-2012, 01:09 AM
The first time I played at a club with Har-Tru courts, I was impressed with the comfort and playing hours with no ill effects at the time or the next day. They replaced the Har-Tru courts with Claytec courts (synthetic membrane with har-tru dressing on top) and while I absolutely love how they play, and comfort is better than hard courts, it is not as comfortable as the old Har-Tru.

That's good to know. Thanks, dParis.

mikeler
02-15-2012, 09:07 AM
I have played recently on a green clay court in California (I don't know the exact type of clay).

It was slippery all right, but I found it odd that the comfort you feel on red clay or mere dirt court just wasn't there.

I'd say it was only a tad more comfortable than a hard court.

Is this typical of all green clay courts?


To me, it all depends on the amount of clay they lay down. The City club I play at has a small amount of clay on top of their base. Sometimes you can see the rocks after a good rain. So it as not as comfortable as some of the more swanky private clubs in the area which have a few inches of clay on top of their base.