PDA

View Full Version : Pre-stretching good for any string?


geo
03-14-2004, 04:57 PM
Is pre-stretching good for all and any string?
50/60 pounds for 60 sec. for all?
What are the other benefits besides tension stability?

Tx in advance
-geo-

Eug
03-14-2004, 05:31 PM
I feel that tension stability would be the only benefit. The strings would feel stiffer than usual. I do not pre stretch because my MS200tt is constant pull and it strings tighter as is.

David Pavlich
03-14-2004, 06:59 PM
I prestretch all string except Kevlar (what's the use?). One, for the reason already mentioned (less tension creep) and two, because it makes the string easier to handle. I'd love to watch someone string some Ballistic Polymono without prestretching it.

David

Eug
03-14-2004, 07:02 PM
But dont you think the extra stiffness should be a major factor considering?

David Pavlich
03-14-2004, 07:19 PM
In my case, no. I do it for ALL of my customers so there is no inconsistency in the string bed feel from frame to frame.

Consistency is the guiding rule in stringing. As long as you follow good stringing practices and do things the same, you will produce a good string bed.

David

Eug
03-14-2004, 08:44 PM
David, I still dont understand why there would be an inconsistency if you do not prestretch. Like you said, consistency is the guiding rule in stringing...I completely agree with you, but if your consistent with non prestretched strings then everything turns out fine. You cant nuetralize string bed feel for every racquet/string combo there is. Just wondering what you thoughts are.

Eug

Hawaii 5.0
03-14-2004, 11:53 PM
It removes some of the coil memory in the string making it easier to handle and helps lessen tension loss even with CP machine.In most cases customers will ask that I do it(I do prestretch) becuase it's not policy for many places to prestretch unless asked or it's up to the stringer.When I do tournaments I do a 5-15% machine prestretch to ensure consistency between me and the other stringer or if it's only me or whatever.

geo
03-15-2004, 01:27 AM
If tension stability is the benefit, wouldn't stringing 10/15% higher bring the same result to the string bed? I mean to pre-stretch for 60 sec, is not the same as stringing with higher tension on a drop weight machine and waiting 60 sec with the strings on the frame? Interested.
-geo-

Aga
03-15-2004, 03:08 AM
I want to use Prince More Feel at about 62 lbs

how much should I prestrech???

David Pavlich
03-15-2004, 11:41 PM
If tension stability is the benefit, wouldn't stringing 10/15% higher bring the same result to the string bed? I mean to pre-stretch for 60 sec, is not the same as stringing with higher tension on a drop weight machine and waiting 60 sec with the strings on the frame? Interested.
-geo-

There's been a lot of discussion about hand pre-stretch and machine pre-stretch. I believe pre-stretching by hand (the whole length of the string) is better because when machine stretching, you stretch differing lengths of string. This causes an inconsistency in each pull.

As far as consistency, sure it is just as consistent to string with or without pre-stretching as long as the stringer does his part. Again, I do it because it helps with tension creep and it makes it easier to handle the string. I did three Volkl Tour 7s today with ALU Power. I cannot imagine doing these frames without pre-stretching the ALU. It would be like attempting to string with a Slinky!

I also did two frames with Head Rip Control. This stuff is like wrestling a boa constrictor without pre-stretching it.

Stretching enhances stringing time. I did 11 today and will do at least that many tomorrow. Trust me...I need all the help I can get and stretching helps me keep stringing times lower.

It's a personal preference and sometimes a customer demand. Doing it either way is no better or no worse for each person. It's like 1 piece or 2 piece. Each has its pros and cons. Both will produce a great string job if the stringer does his part.

David

Hawaii 5.0
03-16-2004, 01:12 AM
Well machine prestretches keep consistency more accurate between stringers,like say there are 5 stringers for a tourney and all the machines have a 10% prestretch then they will be much more consistent than any hand prestretch.Plus the machine prestretch is to overtension and then bring back down so say you set it to 60,it will pull to 66 and then bring back down and hold at 60 so there will always be consitency between lengths, but not between jobs and stringers.

At tournaments when I'm not the only stringer I prefer machine prestretch, but for customers at work I prefer handprestretch since any multi frame job will be done by one stringer.I agree with David, but choosing a stringer based on preferences can be tough, but that's why I prefer one method for certain situations versus others.

polakosaur
03-16-2004, 11:32 AM
so what is the most consistent way to prestretch, hand wise and machine wise.

Gaines Hillix
03-16-2004, 11:52 AM
Prestretching is less effective on poly and kevlar strings, although I still do it on poly strings. I agree with David on prestretching the entire string versus machine prestretch. Even though the machine is consistent, the effect of 10% over-tension is different on a shorter piece of string than it is on one only a few inches longer. The shorter piece is going to be stiffer than the longer one. That is what is happening when the strings are prestretched in the frame. I use a block of wood about 3/4" square and about 6" long with two holes drilled in it. I loop the string around the knob of the door to my stringing room and then insert the two ends through the wood block and wrap the strings around the block twice and then pull hard on the string for 45 secs. I try to be very consistent with this, but one could argue that a human will never be as consistent as a machine.

David Pavlich
03-16-2004, 06:34 PM
Well machine prestretches keep consistency more accurate between stringers,like say there are 5 stringers for a tourney and all the machines have a 10% prestretch then they will be much more consistent than any hand prestretch.Plus the machine prestretch is to overtension and then bring back down so say you set it to 60,it will pull to 66 and then bring back down and hold at 60 so there will always be consitency between lengths, but not between jobs and stringers.

At tournaments when I'm not the only stringer I prefer machine prestretch, but for customers at work I prefer handprestretch since any multi frame job will be done by one stringer.I agree with David, but choosing a stringer based on preferences can be tough, but that's why I prefer one method for certain situations versus others.

You're correct in the sense that the machine will prestretch at the same rate every time. It is my understanding that some of the pro players request a machine that prestretches..

There was a Challenger tournament here last Summer. The on-site stringer was using a crank machine. Several of the players were disappointed when they saw it. I guess these guys get used to seeing Sensors and Technifibres in the stringing room.

David

Eug
03-16-2004, 07:32 PM
My Laserfibre MS200tt is beloved by many but do the pro's love this machine as well? I know they are into electronic ones like David said but just curious.

Eug