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pmata814
06-01-2007, 08:15 AM
I am planning to play in 4 tournaments this summer (between June 15 and July 20). The first one is in two weeks. What would be the best way to prepare for these tourneys?

I am a 3.5 player, 31 yrs. old, and I am overweight. I think losing a few pounds will definitely help my game and my chances at these tournaments. I know there isn't much time left but I just found out about them. My plan was just to combine cardio at the gym with time on the court with my ball machine and a playing partner. What do you think? Should I lift weights also? I can't go on the court two days in a row anyways because of my shins so I have to combine it with the gym. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.

P.S.
I know the first tournament is just around the corner but if I can make the July 20th tournament my ultimate goal I think I can accomplish something.

LuckyR
06-01-2007, 08:26 AM
Is your stamina suspect? Are you worried about the heat? (where are you located)? Are you worried about footspeed?

pmata814
06-01-2007, 10:40 AM
Is your stamina suspect? Are you worried about the heat? (where are you located)? Are you worried about footspeed?

Yes (to all of the above.) I am located in south texas. Depending on the time of the day it could get as hot as 100degrees. Honestly, I've never been past the first round so I usually play in the morning and it's not that hot. But I would very much like to win a match this year :D

Supernatural_Serve
06-01-2007, 11:14 AM
Yes (to all of the above.) I am located in south texas. Depending on the time of the day it could get as hot as 100degrees. You should start working out as much as reasonable between now and then. Focus on cardio. Do the weight room too but, you don't have much time to accomplish much in the weight room.

100 degrees, age 31, overweight. Probably humid too. You are in for a long day on the court should you win a round or two.

Focus on ending points quickly and use your energy to hold serve if the elements are bearing down on you.

There's no point to playing long points out and burning out quickly.

BillH
06-01-2007, 11:53 AM
I'm 54 and play tournaments throughout the summer here in Oklahoma. Last summer, I played singles in a tournament where the on-court temperature was 115 degrees. I felt fine during the match but had the most extreme cramping after the match. You must stay hydrated and keep your body chemistry normal. Take sports drinks, potassium pills, whatever you need so that you don't get the severe cramps - you can't believe how painful it is. Stay in the shade and off your feet on changeovers, use a "cool-tie" bandana, keep a damp towel in your ice chest to put over your head or around your neck at changeovers and keep drinking liquids. Wear light, white clothing and a hat or cap. Between now and then, play out in theat as much as possible to aclimate yourself to the conditions. Good luck.

dave333
06-01-2007, 03:32 PM
Hit the track do some get running. Also do some sprints and do some muscle building exercises o boost metabolism.

Of course, watch what you eat. No fast food, candy, soda, ice cream etc. Most of your calories should be earlier in the day. Drink lots of water.

As for the tourney, bring lots of water, maybe in one of those cooler thingies.

LuckyR
06-01-2007, 04:28 PM
Yes (to all of the above.) I am located in south texas. Depending on the time of the day it could get as hot as 100degrees. Honestly, I've never been past the first round so I usually play in the morning and it's not that hot. But I would very much like to win a match this year :D


I would use the above cool down strategies. I would also concentrate on cardios. Too little time for intervals or weights. Definitely load with salt, carbs and fluids before matches. Continue with the sports drinks during the match if it's going to be 100 degrees. Keep some salt tabs on hand (hopefully you won't need them) for using during the match.

pmata814
06-02-2007, 10:31 AM
Thanks for all the replies. For cardio I plan to use the elliptical machines at the gym. If I run I won't be able to play tennis because of my shin splints. I have lots of great tips here. Thanks again.

Broken string
06-06-2007, 11:48 PM
While trying to loose weight the first weight that goes is water weight due to exsesive muscular tear down before build up of your stamina. So get those liquids H2O and some sort of electrolight too much so called energy drink to replenish your bodies needs can get you into trouble witth your health

chess9
06-07-2007, 04:13 AM
Well, my view is decidedly different.

Staying fit is a life-style choice, meaning a long term approach to healthy living. It isn't about getting ready at the last minute for some tennis tournaments. In fact, this is one of the WORST things you can do to your body, but is so typical of the weekend warrior who sits at a desk all week, stuffs himself with the wrong foods and then tries to pretend he's fit on the weekend. After the tournaments, you will be back to stuffing your face, not working out, and limping to boot. Your self-esteem will be low as well because YOU HAVEN'T PREPARED properly and will lose in the early rounds, AND may suffer an injury!

Just my opinion, young man. I'm sure I'm wrong as usual.

-Robert

PowerServe
06-08-2007, 02:22 AM
Hey PM.

I respectfully disagree on the the advice about staying away from the weight room. Especially if your main goal is going to be the July Tournament. You'll need as much anaerobic conditioning as you can get, since sprints are out...

Try this for a quick cardio routine, 3-4 days per week. It'll help you recover on the court and you'll shed fat like a mad man. Plus, once you get going, you won't have any problem catching your second wind in a tough match.

http://tennisfitnesstips.com/backissues/high_intensity_tennis_training.html

TS

Bottle Rocket
06-08-2007, 07:02 PM
chess9, that is by far the most encouraging post I have ever read on this board. :rolleyes:

chess9
06-09-2007, 05:32 AM
chess9, that is by far the most encouraging post I have ever read on this board. :rolleyes:

Well, there is a story told about Lee Trevino giving advice on putting to an amateur partner in a Pro-Am:

"Take two weeks off, then quit." :)

Preparation is extremely important and is often overlooked as we enter middle-age and all that entails regarding the responsibilities of family, friends, and work. But, to stay healthy on the court requires patience, dedication, and a good sense of perspective. Are a few summer tournament matches worth an injury? Your call....

-Robert