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grif
06-02-2007, 05:55 PM
"....
Somebody compared Murray's temper tantrums to John McEnroe, but McEnroe got furious at everything - the umpire, the opponent (me, a couple of times), or somebody eating a vanilla ice cream cone up in the stands. Andy mainly gets angry at Andy for not doing it perfect. That's the difference in their tempers.

Sometimes he takes it out on me and starts screaming stuff. No problem. I don't have a glass jaw and know he's just venting out of frustration with himself. During a match if he loses his temper, busts a racket, cracks it - no problem. The problem comes if he's still *****ing about it six points later. That's a problem I don't want to see and will address.

I don't mind if there's a blow-up now and then, but overall, match to match to match, I think you'll see Andy more reserved, more in control of himself as he learns to stop fighting himself on the court. He's never going to be a choirboy, but he is going to develop better control of his reactions.

..."

http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,,2093782,00.html

David L
06-02-2007, 06:22 PM
Good article. Interesting to hear what Gilbert has planned for Murray. Beats hearing all the unsupported speculation on this board about player/coach relationships. Also interesting that Gilbert thinks we are witnessing the strongest field in tennis history. He clearly sees it from an ability standpoint, not distinction of achievement. This is probably a more accurate way of judging what is currently occurring in tennis.

callitout
06-03-2007, 06:12 AM
The rumor is he's likely out for Wimbledon because of his wrist injury.
Hopefully he'll be back for the summer hardcourt season.

jackcrawford
06-03-2007, 06:30 AM
Also interesting that Gilbert thinks we are witnessing the strongest field in tennis history. He clearly sees it from an ability standpoint
Jonas Bjorkman, a 35 year-old doubles specialist would not be going deep into singles draws in majors (semis at Wimbledon last year and still going in this year's French) if this were true; he would be forced off the tour by the rising tide of superior players. This is what happened in the NBA in the late 50's when Russell and Chamberlain's generation of players arrived and reduced current all-stars to ordinary status and forced journeymen out of the league.

BounceHitBounceHit
06-03-2007, 06:51 AM
Good article. Interesting to hear what Gilbert has planned for Murray. Beats hearing all the unsupported speculation on this board about player/coach relationships. Also interesting that Gilbert thinks we are witnessing the strongest field in tennis history. He clearly sees it from an ability standpoint, not distinction of achievement. This is probably a more accurate way of judging what is currently occurring in tennis.


I couldn't agree more that the 'field' of the ATP Tour is stronger now (on the whole) than it has EVER been. We've been lucky to bear witness to this era. Good stuff for the tennis fan. CC

David L
06-03-2007, 06:59 AM
Jonas Bjorkman, a 35 year-old doubles specialist would not be going deep into singles draws in majors (semis at Wimbledon last year and still going in this year's French) if this were true; he would be forced off the tour by the rising tide of superior players. This is what happened in the NBA in the late 50's when Russell and Chamberlain's generation of players arrived and reduced current all-stars to ordinary status and forced journeymen out of the league.Who says? It's not like Bjorkman does this routinely. Also, he had very good draws in each of the runs you mention, and he still had to fight tooth and nail, often scraping by in 5 sets. You will find isolated instances of b, c and d list players going far in draws in every era. If he was consistently doing this now, you might have a point, but that's not the case. Lastly, he's 35 not 70. You can still be very competitive at 35, the biggest difficulty is recovery, but if you stay motivated and take care of your fitness, you can still compete. There are loads of people in sport in their 30s competing effectively and adapting to improving standards, at the highest level.

herosol
06-03-2007, 12:39 PM
lol vanilla ice cream?
seriously?

jackcrawford
06-03-2007, 09:06 PM
You will find isolated instances of b, c and d list players going far in draws in every era.
Exactly my point - nothing special about this group of players. If they had raised the bar, this couldn't happen. Bjorkman is nowhere near the player he was at 25, that's impossible without doping, so him doing this at majors is all the proof you need - signature significance, to borrow baseball analyst Bill James' term.

David L
06-03-2007, 10:08 PM
Exactly my point - nothing special about this group of players. If they had raised the bar, this couldn't happen. Bjorkman is nowhere near the player he was at 25, that's impossible without doping, so him doing this at majors is all the proof you need - signature significance, to borrow baseball analyst Bill James' term.Your reasoning is poor, nor do you address any of the other points I made. Bjorkman going far, and just barely at that, in a couple of Grandslams out of the blue with the benefit of kind draws and this being a more technically proficient era than previous eras, are not mutually exclusive. Furthermore, I think it is possible for an older player to put in a performance that would defeat a younger version of themselves, particularly if they have had to raise their standards to a current more advanced mode. Agassi at 30, would have killed the Agassi at 20.