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TacoBellBorderBowl1946
06-06-2007, 08:59 AM
will running two miles a day, doing 150 pushups and 150 tricep dips give you good strength and conditioning for tennis?

richw76
06-06-2007, 11:37 AM
will running two miles a day, doing 150 pushups and 150 tricep dips give you good strength and conditioning for tennis?

it couldn't hurt ;-) .... only thing if you are in shape then you are probably doing 6-8 min miles. Unless you are on a very hilly course more running couldn't hurt.... of course if you are playing 2-3 hours of tennis a day.......

Is the 2 miles a short run and stretch before/after practice? then yep cool. It's just a warmup/cooldown. I doubt it will increase your cardio capacity though.

TacoBellBorderBowl1946
06-06-2007, 12:27 PM
yea, I do it on the threadmill, before I play.
How much upperbody strength is needed for tennis though. I know that you need strong legs for serves, but does strong arms help you hit faster serves and groundstrokes?

Janne
06-06-2007, 12:40 PM
I think it could potentially hurt you if you do it everyday. Your body needs to rest or else you will actually become WEAKER. 2 miles also doesnt sound that much so if you want to improve your endurance I would aim for a minimum of 3 miles and in a certain time. When you feel that you have much more energy after running the 3 miles then before (this could take a month, two, three it really depends on you) I would move up to 4 miles and so on.

Just my 2 cents,
Janne

dave333
06-06-2007, 01:07 PM
Also do sprints.

TacoBellBorderBowl1946
06-07-2007, 05:56 AM
how could running two miles everyday hurt you?

richw76
06-07-2007, 07:06 AM
how could running two miles everyday hurt you?

I would say no matter how hard you run, doing only two miles a day you can never over train and it will never hurt you. and it is a good warmup, but like I said it will most likely not help you much(cardiovascularly) unless you are doing interval training or hills, etc.

Also because a treadmill almost pulls you unless you are doing it on an incline you are doing even less work than if you went outside your door and ran. But I wouldn't stop doing it.

for more advice I'd need to know how old you are and what your time constraints are, also are you in an organized tennis program, and you are already doing sprints, etc with them?

and I just noticed the 1946 in your screen name. If you're in your 50-60.... I'd stick to the 2 miles and maybe consider switching to swimming less wear and tear. Or stick to the two miles on the treadmill. Most treadmills offer much more cushioning than the street, and may be saving your knees and back ;-)

and to arm/shoulder strength <shrug> I think it's probably not nearly as important as good balance, strong core/legs. I knew this guy in high school was top 30 in florida and was skinny as a rail and could probably bench 20 pounds max on a great day. I mean even the weakest guy is stronger than 98% of Pro tennis women. Not exactly sure where I'm going with this but you are probably fine, but heck as long as you're not bulking up to the point that it negatively impacts your swing you are probably cool.

Janne
06-07-2007, 08:16 AM
I never said you could get hurt or become weaker from running only 2 miles. I was talking about doing 150 push-ups and tricep dips. It is a fact that if you train hard you need to let your muscles rest or you will actually become weaker instead of becoming stronger. As I said in my previous post, 2 miles is not much, rather, it's actually very little in my opinion and as others have said: If you want to improve your endurance, you'll need to run more than that and it'll help you even more if you set a certain period of time as your goal.



Again, just my 2 cents,
Janne

TacoBellBorderBowl1946
06-07-2007, 12:13 PM
Richw, what exercises do you recommend for strong legs/core?

Janne
06-07-2007, 01:44 PM
I know I´m not richw76 but here are some exercises if you have weights.

Legs:
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Quadriceps/BBLunge.html
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Quadriceps/DBLunge.html

Stomache:
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/RectusAbdominis/WtCrunch.html
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/RectusAbdominis/WtHangingLegHipRaise.html
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/RectusAbdominis/WtVUp.html

Chest:
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/PectoralSternal/DBBenchPress.html
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/PectoralSternal/DBFly.html
http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/PectoralSternal/WtChestDip.html



Cheers,
Janne

atatu
06-07-2007, 01:56 PM
I know I've weighed in on this before and some of you may be sick of hearing my opinion on this, but if you want to improve your tennis endurance then train like a tennis player - don't run long distances, run sprints, lateral movement, up and back movement, short and intense. The two miles is fine to lose weight and get some general endurance, but beyond I don't see the benefit.

Let's assume we have two tennis players both with the same level of fitness: they both play tennis 2 times a week for 2 hours. In addition player A trains 3 days of distance running, anywhere between 2-5 miles. Player B trains 3 daysa a week doing on court sprints and plyometrics ? Which player is better prepared to play a long three set match ? I say player B, no contest.

Janne
06-07-2007, 02:11 PM
I dont know why anyone would be sick of hearing your opinion atatu as it is RIGHT ON! I can't believe I forgot about the whole sprinting part... Listen to atatu people! Tennis is an explosive sport where you often have to go from standing almost still to running full speed and repeating that pattern over and over again. Though I would not concentrate fully on sprints and would mix it up, doing sprints every other time and regular running the next.

PowerServe
06-07-2007, 10:34 PM
Here's a free video on tennis agility drills that will help your leg strength. Though, you'll get more out of it if you already have a moderate foundation of leg strength:

http://tennisfitnesstips.com/ultimateprogram/agilityvideo

If you want to access the rest of the video series as they're released, you can log on to:

http://UltimateTennisConditioning.com

Or if you'd like, I can post them as they become available.

TS

P.S. I agree 100% with Atatu, while long distance running has its place in training for tennis, if you want to improve your tennis endurance, the best way to do it is as if you're in a match with short and intense forward, backward, and lateral movements.

Ano
06-08-2007, 01:21 AM
I know I've weighed in on this before and some of you may be sick of hearing my opinion on this, but if you want to improve your tennis endurance then train like a tennis player - don't run long distances, run sprints, lateral movement, up and back movement, short and intense. The two miles is fine to lose weight and get some general endurance, but beyond I don't see the benefit.

Let's assume we have two tennis players both with the same level of fitness: they both play tennis 2 times a week for 2 hours. In addition player A trains 3 days of distance running, anywhere between 2-5 miles. Player B trains 3 daysa a week doing on court sprints and plyometrics ? Which player is better prepared to play a long three set match ? I say player B, no contest.

What you said is known as the principle of specificity. One way to remember it is with the acronym SAID, which stands for Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands.

This means that your body will respond and adapt specifically to whatever you do to it. Thus, if you lift weights, your body becomes stronger so that you can lift more and more.

If you run, you body adapts by developing thye muscles involved so that you can run more. It should now be easy to see that all sports are specific.

So, I'm not sick of hearing your opinion, in fact, I agree 100 % with you.

TacoBellBorderBowl1946
06-08-2007, 06:19 AM
thanks guys/gals

princess bossass
06-11-2007, 10:00 PM
I never said you could get hurt or become weaker from running only 2 miles. I was talking about doing 150 push-ups and tricep dips. It is a fact that if you train hard you need to let your muscles rest or you will actually become weaker instead of becoming stronger. As I said in my previous post, 2 miles is not much, rather, it's actually very little in my opinion and as others have said: If you want to improve your endurance, you'll need to run more than that and it'll help you even more if you set a certain period of time as your goal.

Again, just my 2 cents,
Janne

I agree with Janne--in layman's terms, when you're trying to build strength (i.e., muscle), the actual "building" process is really part of a "healing" or recovery process. When you exhaust your muscles, you actually damage the tissue. As your body recovers, rebuilding the damaged tissue, it "overdoes" the recovery slightly each time so that it can be prepared to perform the same task with less potential for damage next time. This is why you can't keep lifting the same weight and still build muscle after you've grown stronger.

In other words, if you don't give your muscles time to recover, they can't rebuild and grow. In fact, the cumulative damage can eventually become more destructive than productive, and you put yourself at risk for injury.

Just sayin'. I agree with janne. :-)

I heart jocktalk.

Tennis4203
06-11-2007, 10:49 PM
yea, I do it on the threadmill, before I play.
How much upperbody strength is needed for tennis though. I know that you need strong legs for serves, but does strong arms help you hit faster serves and groundstrokes?

I would avoid the treadmill if possible...it is like 64% (or something like that)
less affective because on actual ground , you need to give yourself the speed, but on the treadmill it gives you speed so all you need to do basically is just keep up with it, while on the ground you need more force driving you forward...

hey but this is just my 2 cents... don't take this advice if you don't think it's necessary

zapvor
06-12-2007, 02:19 AM
no i think running 2 miles a day could be detrimental to your joints. especially on the knees. as with the others, just my 2 cents

goober
06-12-2007, 05:17 AM
There's nothing wrong with jogging 2 miles. That's only like a 15-20 minute run which is a warmup! It is not in anyway considered "long distance" training. You can certainly do this regularly without putting too much strain on your body. Just don't run on concrete. Choose grass or dirt if possible and wear real running shoes.

I certainly agree you need to focus more on agility drillls for tennis.

arnz
06-13-2007, 05:45 AM
2 miles is actually very short distance. I would gradually build up to 3 miles (its usually the shortest distance running event - called the 5k -IMHO milers are already in the near sprinter category)

Like has already been advised, sprints are a good idea for tennis specific aerobics, but I wouldnt start that way. I would continue distance running building up to at least 12-15 miles a week (3 -5 miles 3 or 4x/week) to build your cardiovascular base and condition your joints for the harder impact of sprints. Its very easy to hurt yourself if you go into full sprints without adequate preparation. Of course, if your already in excellent shape, or you are 17 years old that might be less of a concern

rasajadad
06-13-2007, 05:53 AM
yea, I do it on the threadmill, before I play.
How much upperbody strength is needed for tennis though. I know that you need strong legs for serves, but does strong arms help you hit faster serves and groundstrokes?

I think the strength is needed for injury prevention and recovery. Try two singles matches a day for two days after you're 50!