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View Full Version : Allow mid match coaching for god's sake


armand
06-09-2007, 08:50 PM
This was really embarrassing for the WTA and something's gotta be done. I remember a while ago they allowed coaching and it seemed to promote good turnarounds for players getting whipped.

Desperate times...

FiveO
06-09-2007, 08:59 PM
This was really embarrassing for the WTA and something's gotta be done. I remember a while ago they allowed coaching and it seemed to promote good turnarounds for players getting whipped.

Desperate times...


I disagree. Part of being a champion in tennis is requirement that the individual needs to "work it out" for him or herself while managing everything else during the course of a match and tournament. It is a heavy workload and rewards not only a able body, mechanically sound game, desire, steely nerve but also a nimble mind under pressure, sometimes crushing pressure. It is one of the elements that makes the sport demanding and a champion worthy.

latinking
06-09-2007, 09:06 PM
I think it would be very interesting if they would allow it. Why not, in boxing you get coaching, same type of thing. Coaches get paid tons of money the players should get thier moneys worth. It would have definetly made todays boring match much better.

Silent
06-09-2007, 09:33 PM
Nope.

There's no reason why a coach shouldn't try and think about the various situations that could happen in a match against a specific opponent. The coach then informs his player before the match. Then, with all the tools in hands, the player needs to get through this match on his own.

Also, one could argue that there is already coaching during matches.

Maybe coaches need to teach upcoming players new styles of tennis, giving the best new tastes, instead of the same old recipe.

armand
06-09-2007, 09:47 PM
I disagree. Part of being a champion in tennis is requirement that the individual needs to "work it out" for him or herself while managing everything else during the course of a match and tournament. It is a heavy workload and rewards not only a able body, mechanically sound game, desire, steely nerve but also a nimble mind under pressure, sometimes crushing pressure. It is one of the elements that makes the sport demanding and a champion worthy.Yeah I know but women's tennis has had enough of that. There are too many failures, too many one sided wins and no end in sight. Pro Tennis is a business first and a sport 2nd. And what happened and what keeps happening is bad for business and this damages all levels of tennis.

rfprse
06-09-2007, 10:20 PM
I disagree. Part of being a champion in tennis is requirement that the individual needs to "work it out" for him or herself while managing everything else during the course of a match and tournament. It is a heavy workload and rewards not only a able body, mechanically sound game, desire, steely nerve but also a nimble mind under pressure, sometimes crushing pressure. It is one of the elements that makes the sport demanding and a champion worthy.

Yup. Well said.

The Gorilla
06-09-2007, 10:21 PM
singles tennis.

crazylevity
06-09-2007, 11:57 PM
Yeah I know but women's tennis has had enough of that. There are too many failures, too many one sided wins and no end in sight. Pro Tennis is a business first and a sport 2nd. And what happened and what keeps happening is bad for business and this damages all levels of tennis.

Just for the French women's final, it wouldn't have made a difference. Because Ivanovic's coach Sven Groenefeld is hired by adidas and not Ivanovic, the contract terms state that he would not be able to advise Ivanovic given that Henin is also a Team Adidas member.

defensive4
06-10-2007, 04:34 AM
Yeah there would be better GS finals if it was allowed, look at how the match could change around in the fo if it was...

diggler
06-10-2007, 04:59 AM
I don't have a strong opinion either way, but I'm surprised at the strength of anti coaching comments. Yes you should prepare before the match, but that equally applies to anything. Let's ban coaching during basketball. Let the captain work in out. Let's ban coaching in boxing.

As I said, I don't really care. Maybe they could ask the players before each match and if both agree, they could allow it.

skip1969
06-10-2007, 05:40 AM
I disagree. Part of being a champion in tennis is requirement that the individual needs to "work it out" for him or herself while managing everything else during the course of a match and tournament. It is a heavy workload and rewards not only a able body, mechanically sound game, desire, steely nerve but also a nimble mind under pressure, sometimes crushing pressure. It is one of the elements that makes the sport demanding and a champion worthy.
best post i've read in forever.

what happened in yesterday's match is irrelevant. there hasn't been a competitive rg final in years, but i doubt you'll hear the rg organizers crying for on-court coaching.

tennis is an individual sport. players at all levels are expected to excute a game plan once they get onto the court, whether they've come up with it themselves (for the weekend warriors) or they are atp or wta pros. players have been figuring out how to win matches for 100 years. what are we saying now, that they are too dumb to execute a given game-plan given to them hours or minutes before the start of a match?

or that male pros are smarter than the females, and the poor girls need someone on the court to tell them what to doc os they just can't manage the whole thing on their own?? nonsense!

there have always been one-sided matches and there always will be. if a players cannot go from a plan a to a plan b oto a plan c . . . well then, he/she probably doesn't deserve to win in the first place.

armand
06-11-2007, 11:10 PM
Tennis is a dying sport because of mindsets like this. "Tradition" and "the way it's always been"...the mantra of a man too afraid of change, of the unknown and being left behind.

You got basketball, football, futbol, baseball, golf etc, etc. All those sports have mid game coaching and you know what else? The governing bodies know that they are running a business and if there's a flaw somewhere, they will correct it. And you know what else? These sports are all more popular than tennis.

FarFed
06-11-2007, 11:25 PM
It would change the entire complexion of the sport, and most importantly the kind of players that succeed at it. Imagine, we could have players who know very little about adapting to the opponent's game, reading the opponent's game, or raising their level of play based on the opponent. Instead, we could have average players mentally who could have fantastic coaches "helping them out" in between games. Would we like such players who would have won based on a lot of on-court assistance? I wouldn't.

It is a big deal and it could change everything. In cricket, the late South African captain Hansie Cronje was suspended by the International Cricket Council for using a device through which he could speak to his coach while he was playing on the field. Imagine that happening in a soccer game! In tennis it's even worse, because there are numerous breaks during which coaching could be sought, the coach could monitor his opponent's each and every move. It would just suck the life out of a good tennis match. We would stop thinking "what's he gonna do now?", and instead would be thinking "what's his coach told him to do now?". It would be a mere puppet show.

A small change could change everything for tennis, not necessarily for the better, and that's scary.

helloworld
06-11-2007, 11:45 PM
Tennis is a dying sport because of mindsets like this. "Tradition" and "the way it's always been"...the mantra of a man too afraid of change, of the unknown and being left behind.

You got basketball, football, futbol, baseball, golf etc, etc. All those sports have mid game coaching and you know what else? The governing bodies know that they are running a business and if there's a flaw somewhere, they will correct it. And you know what else? These sports are all more popular than tennis.

I don't see how baseball can be more popular than tennis. Only Japan and the US play baseball. Noone else even care about baseball rather than those two countries.

zapvor
06-12-2007, 02:44 AM
I don't see how baseball can be more popular than tennis. Only Japan and the US play baseball. Noone else even care about baseball rather than those two countries.

Cuba is pretty big too.

FiveO
06-12-2007, 04:59 AM
Tennis is a dying sport because of mindsets like this. "Tradition" and "the way it's always been"...the mantra of a man too afraid of change, of the unknown and being left behind.

You got basketball, football, futbol, baseball, golf etc, etc. All those sports have mid game coaching and you know what else? The governing bodies know that they are running a business and if there's a flaw somewhere, they will correct it. And you know what else? These sports are all more popular than tennis.

Tennis is dying in the U.S. because it receives next to no support for it in the U.S.. Most to blame are the USTA, USOC, NCAA (allowing entire teams to be comprised of foreign nationals), and every other entity competing for American sport and entertainment dollars in the U.S..

Every sport in the US is feeling the pinch at the gate and in TV ratings aside from the NFL and MLB. The NHL and the NBA are taking a beating in both areas. Even the formerly booming NASCAR is having to come up with some different strategies and business models as interest in that motorsport plateaus.

Tennis is tennis. This revolutionary view of overthrowing tradition in tennis to make it more economically viable flies in the face of Golf success/failure rate in terms of attendance and tv ratings when that sport's rules are maintained to the nth degree along with their traditions. The PGA's success/failure tipping point only has to do with whether or not Tiger Woods and to a lesser degree, Phil Mickelson are playing the event. Period. But overall golf has demonstrated continued growth while holding on with a death grip to the rules and traditions it has always valued and obviously hasn't suffered any ill effects from doing so. What they and advertisers wisely did was to promote the sport using its most recognizable and charasmatic face.

Allowing coaching would remove one of the most integral pillars of the sport of tennis. It is a physical mano-a-mano contest as well as a cerebral one. Physical chess. Where brain could many times outwit pure physical brawn. Hence the added beauty of watching a Hingis where her thought process on court is more evident than with most players. In our individual sport, adaptability, the ability to think and adjust on the fly, and the ability to think clearly under pressure is a core element of the game and is not just on its periphery.

Use electronic confirmation of line calls (all the time) and play music on the changeovers but don't change the core elements of the game.

Cindysphinx
06-12-2007, 05:54 AM
No, sorry. Don't like the coaching between sets on the women's side. Not from a fan's perspective, anyway. Lots of players spoke other languages to preserve their privacy. What little that could be heard was hardly earth-shattering stuff: "Go for your shots!"

Part of the fun of watching tennis is when players self-destruct. Hingis in the FO final. Jana Novotna. Having coaching would prevent that. Also, I liked watching Fed trying different things to beat Nadal. It wouldn't be so cool if he were just executing what someone else told him to do, like a little Fed robot.