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ktownva
06-11-2007, 04:44 AM
Federer said the disappointment of coming up short again in Paris lasted five minutes, then he was thinking about the grass court season...

This sounds crazy to me. Why would he say something like that? The way he played the final was also confusing. It was like so many of their other matches on clay before Hamburg. He seemed to have so little confidence and mental toughness. I'm not sure why Roger didn't fight like we thought he would, or why he would act like losing was no big deal. Nadal was tough, but that's no reason to just cave.

Virtuous
06-11-2007, 04:56 AM
How would dwelling on the disappointment and carrying that baggage into the grass season do him any good? The fact of the matter is, what's done is done. There's nothing he can do about his tactics or the outcome now. He needs to get over it and get his mindset right for Wimbledon, and beating himself up over this is not the right approach.Thankfully, he seems to realize that.

I remember reading a similar quote from him after the final last year, and that attitude certainly served him well during the second half of season.

David L
06-11-2007, 05:15 AM
Federer said the disappointment of coming up short again in Paris lasted five minutes, then he was thinking about the grass court season...

This sounds crazy to me. Why would he say something like that? The way he played the final was also confusing. It was like so many of their other matches on clay before Hamburg. He seemed to have so little confidence and mental toughness. I'm not sure why Roger didn't fight like we thought he would, or why he would act like losing was no big deal. Nadal was tough, but that's no reason to just cave.What makes you think he caved in? He lost to someone who some say is the greatest clay court player ever. No shame in that. He tried his best, but the better man won on the day. Nadals game is tough to handle on clay, even for Federer. As he said in his press conference, Nadal's game is awkward for him. It's difficult to play your game and attack him, he does'nt allow you to do it. That high lefty spin to the backhand is a big problem for him.

What do you expect Federer to do? Wallow in self pity? He has to get ready for Wimbledon. He'll have other opportunities to win the French. He can also still do things to improve his game. Agassi was in two French Open finals before he won it at the age of 29. You simply can't predict the future. One thing I like about Federer is that he seems to have a lot of perpspective and is very determined. He plans on playing the Olympics in 2012 at Wimbledon. He's looking at the big picture and if he remains healthy, hopes to be a contender at the French for at least the next 5 years. It's not over till the fat lady sings, and life goes on. Other records to break. Another thing is, as much as he would like to win the French, he would still prefer to win Wimbledon in any given year. Some think this is strange, but Federer reveres Wimbledon more than anything. He has said it time and time again, he would always take a Wimbledon title over the French. I believe it would hurt him more to lose there, but he'd still get over it if he did and move on. I think Federer is already very grateful for what he has achieved and the life he has, but will continue to see if he can achieve more. Nothing is guaranteed in this life.

realplayer
06-11-2007, 05:22 AM
He probably never believed that he really could beat Nadal anyway although he tells everyone otherwise. He will win wimbledon again because he has so much more skill than the rest but he lacks mental toughness if he has to work really hard and then you don't deserve to win.

Buuurnz
06-11-2007, 05:26 AM
believe me, he thinks that he can bat nadal on any surface...and he already did! So why wouldnt he think he couldnt?

Buuurnz
06-11-2007, 05:27 AM
would he think

realplayer
06-11-2007, 05:38 AM
[QUOTE=Buuurnz;1510441]believe me, he thinks that he can bat nadal on any surface...and he already did! So why wouldnt he think he couldnt?

Because that was Hamburg and this is the French Open.

ktownva
06-11-2007, 05:41 AM
I don't think he should dwell on it either, but he played poorly, and brushed it off casually. What I meant by caving in, let's see, not converting 10 break points in a game and then immediately getting broken at love. If that's not caving then what is? Double faulting four points in a row? 1 of 17 break points won total. Like he didn't even want the damn trophy.

Rhino
06-11-2007, 05:52 AM
^^if he didn't want the trophy he wouldn't have earned the break points. Nadal plays the big points very well thats all.
Fed is an adult who brushes of disappointments and that contributes to his success. He could pull a Gaudio if you want and go around moaning and lose all his confidence but he's Federer and he moves on.

realplayer
06-11-2007, 05:52 AM
It's possible you don't convert ten break points but Federer just gave up when he was 3-0 down in the third set. He made it easy for Nadal.

realplayer
06-11-2007, 05:55 AM
^^if he didn't want the trophy he wouldn't have earned the break points. Nadal plays the big points very well thats all.
Fed is an adult who brushes of disappointments and that contributes to his success. He could pull a Gaudio if you want and go around moaning and lose all his confidence but he's Federer and he moves on.

Federer made easy mistakes and played defensively on break points.

David L
06-11-2007, 05:59 AM
I don't think he should dwell on it either, but he played poorly, and brushed it off casually. What I meant by caving in, let's see, not converting 10 break points in a game and then immediately getting broken at love. If that's not caving then what is? Double faulting four points in a row? 1 of 17 break points won total. Like he didn't even want the damn trophy.Hey listen, matches don't always pan out as one would want them to. You have an opponent on the other side of the net just as determined to win as you are. Nadal played really well on those breakpoints in the first set, he did'nt allow Federer to take the initiative. Nadal was basically a different player when he was down breakpoints in the first set, it was strange. Federer is not a puppet master who can completely control the dynamics of a match, he is only one half of the equation, who has some say. Nadal, however, has a bigger say because he is in his element on clay and his natural game just matches perfectly against Federer on this surface.

diegaa
06-11-2007, 06:00 AM
my guess is that he´s doing a (futile) effort to stick positive. what else can he do?

tHotGates
06-11-2007, 06:08 AM
I'm not sure if this was already posted ......


Day 15 - An interview with Roger Federer - Sunday, June 10, 2007

Part I


Q. At times out there you looked as if you had the weight of the world on your shoulders. Was it Rafael, a struggle with your own game, or what was going on there?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think it was a very physical match, I think. You know, from the start, points were tough and sets were long. I knew that that was going to happen, so I was ready for it, and felt good, though, which was a good thing. Bad thing, I missed too many opportunities. So it was kind of rough on me in the beginning.

And, yeah, I couldn't really impose my game like I wanted to, and, you know, tried to make the game happen with my forehand. You know, he didn't allow me to do that too well today. So, credit to him. And in the end, I was just disappointed I couldn't turn it around, so it's tough.

Q. Did you have a specific strategy going in it or did you just want to feel your way into the match and see what he was going to do and see how you could counter that?

ROGER FEDERER: No, against Rafael, I always said I need a game plan. Against other guys, I can do that, but not against him.

Q. You'd have to say that the failure to convert on all the breakpoints was probably one of the keys to the match. Would you agree with that? And what else happened that you think was the reason for the loss?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I guess that would be the easy way out, just say, "Okay, I missed too many opportunities, otherwise I would have won." But you know, it's just not this way. Davydenko missed many opportunities and lost in straight sets as well.

So you always have to look at your opposition, and Rafael is tough on breakpoints, you know. He's the toughest guy on clay. So I knew that I would have to take my chances. There is one way, you know, to create chances, but then you have to convert them, too. But I couldn't get them done in the first set, especially, and then that maybe in the long run hurt me.

But, you know, I came back, and played okay in the second set, but had a bad start again in the third set, which kind of killed it for me. But, after that, I think, you know, he served better, made less unforced errors, and I couldn't really play the way I wanted from the baseline.

So it was tough, but I think he played an excellent match and deserved to win in the end.

Q. At which point in the match you felt like I'm going to lose this thing?

ROGER FEDERER: Last point, maybe.

Q. Not before?

ROGER FEDERER: Not really, no.

Q. You're the No. 1 player in the world, so there is just this one title that escapes you. Is it acceptable for a champion like yourself? Is it something you can live with, or is it too difficult, and you're going to say to yourself, I'm going to try again next year, and it will be mine?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, obviously, if I would have won today -- again, same thing happened last year. I would have had not many other goals to chase in my career. Like this, it always stays open. And eventually, if I get it, the sweeter it's going to taste.

So hopefully, I'll give myself more and more opportunities, over and over again. I know I can do it now, that's for sure. After playing three very good French Opens, you know, the last three years, Rafa came along and took them all. So it's kind of Rafa and me.

But, you know, I did the same thing to Roddick in Wimbledon, and that's just how it goes. Sometimes you collide and that's what happens.

No, it's not for me something I can't live with. It's okay, you know.

Q. You said this is more often a mental battle, sizing each other up and the mental aspect. Was that more of a factor today? Was it more dominant in the whole match?

ROGER FEDERER: I think it was more physical than mental, I think, today. Because mentally, we're so strong, both of us, you know, that it comes down to physical fitness. I think in the end, that was not decided on that. I just think it was decided in the end on the day for him, and he was the better man today. And he was better.

Q. If you let yourself, what strokes or tactics would you say let you down the most?

ROGER FEDERER: My opponent was tough, made it hard for me. That was -- because I can't particularly say my backhand or my forehand was bad or my volley or my serving. It was all okay, you know. It was just a tough opponent.

Q. It was unfortunate you weren't able to convert any of those breakpoints, but you did even the match. So perhaps the key to this match, really, was his serving down the stretch in the fourth set. And could you comment a bit about how mentally tough he was serving in the fourth set.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I think third and fourth, you know, kind of went similar. We had many more opportunities, both of us, actually, in the first two sets. After that, all of a sudden, you know, we held serve easier. And I was serving better, and I think, maybe I was returning worse. I don't even know.

I just thought he was serving pretty solid, you know, and pretty accurate. It made it hard for me. But, I just think he played it consistently all the way through and didn't allow me many chances in the end, you know. So it was hard.

In the beginning, he might have given me a couple of unforced errors here and there. And that didn't really happen in the end anymore. So I couldn't create too much anymore.

Q. Comparing your emotions right now to those of a year ago, how are you feeling as you sit there now, more philosophical or more disappointed than a year ago?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, I don't know how I felt last year, but I think I was disappointed, you know, for five minutes. Same today, you know. Came back in the locker room, was down and disappointed, and not much to say right then, you know. The worst is when the whole team comes up and goes, "I'm proud of you," you know, "You did a good job. Bad luck." That is the worst part.

But that's okay, you know. I played another final of the Grand Slam. I'm on an incredible run yet again. So disappointment goes away after a short time. And, yeah, I'm an experienced guy. That's not going to kill me, so it's okay.

Q. Pete Sampras said at the height of his rivalry with Andre that Andre always brought the best out in him. And that he would -- he's the only player who, when Andre was up, he would have to play 100% to beat Andre. Do you have similar feelings about Rafa when you play him on clay, that you have to play him at the very top level, and that he brings the best out in you?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know, you know. He's such a different type of player, you know, and he kind of wears you out or wears you down, you know. He's the type of guy that's going to make you miss, you know. So you can never really say you played great against him, for some reason, you know.

I think that's easier said against a righty, you know, where kind of the game is played in a normal manner. With Rafa being a lefty, the whole thing gets kind of screwed up, you know. So that's the tough part. That's why I can never really say I played fantastic or bad against him, because it's just awkward.

Q. And Rafa's ball was very heavy?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, the usual, you know. I'm used to it, so it was tough.

Q. As a person on the court, experienced in the match and going through all that, is it possible to say that any error is unforced?

ROGER FEDERER: Don't understand you.

Q. You know, we're talking from forced errors. In a pressure-cooker match like this, Grand Slam finals, playing against Rafael, are there any errors that you can say are really unforced errors?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I definitely hit unforced errors and forced errors. I don't get it.

But usually, you know, the guy who can force an error out of the opponent doesn't always need to be a clean winner. He's in good shape.

So we both have, you know, the capabilities of putting the opponent under a lot of pressure. And he did better today. So he was good.

Q. Do you think that, like especially in the second set when you controlled the game, it looked as if you either hit winners or made mistakes. And it almost -- like all the points came from you in a positive or negative way. Do you think that like controlling and putting this much strength kind of wears you out physically for the coming sets? And do you think that this game was very close to the last year's final?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, at first, I think the second set actually was played in a way that I liked it, you know, because I was deciding if I was going to win or lose a point. Where other sets, I felt like he was dictating play from the baseline.

And, you know, it's always at the very best levels, the guy can dominate from the baseline. He's in good shape. And so, unfortunately, I was just not -- not good enough in the end, you know, to keep that up.

But physically, that was not the issue. So it was just because he got back into the match and played better in the end. Whereas, maybe in the second set, I didn't allow him to play that well.

tHotGates
06-11-2007, 06:10 AM
Part II


Q. Rafa is 21, and guys like Djokovic are only going to be getting better. Do you expect it's going to be tougher from here on out to win this title, and do you feel the window is closing at all for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, I mean, guys are also kind of going away, you know. So you have -- it always kind of goes in phases, I guess, you know. Sometimes you have a young guy making a breakthrough, like Baghdatis did, you know, a couple of years ago in Australia, or other guys. And then you have the old guys coming along, too. And I'm right in my prime today, I feel.

So I feel my win is definitely not getting smaller. I think with experience and my mental fitness, I think, not that the best years are ahead, but I think like the next few years I'll have a good shot in any tournament I'm playing.

And the French Open, you know, has been very good to me the last few years. And I'm confident that I can win here, and that's the most important. If I'm going to do it, time will tell.

Q. Going into Wimbledon after this, can you just erase a loss in a Grand Slam final knowing how comfortable you are, and feeling how well you're hitting the ball?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, it's always easy to forget the clay season because there was so much talk about it. Once you get on the grass, everything is in the past, you know. It's the same when you go from my hard court loss, you know, twice against Caņas, and going through the clay season. It's kind of in the past, you know. It's easy to forget once you change surfaces.

So, if you win, it's great. If you lose, you know, you kind of forget about it. And I'm very excited about the grass season. I mean, this is a huge opportunity for me once again, Wimbledon, you know, to win there. And hopefully win my fifth in a row, that would be absolutely incredible.

So I hope I can give myself a great chance. And this is a tough sequence of the year right here, you know. Within one and a half months you have two slams, you know. So the first one went well, and I hope Wimbledon's going to be even better.

THE MODERATOR: Questions in French, please.

Q. What makes you suffer most in Nadal's game?

ROGER FEDERER: Excuse me, I don't understand your question.

Q. What is it you don't like in Nadal's tennis? What is most difficult for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he is a very good player on clay. That's very simple. I'm repeating myself. But I think he plays an excellent level of tennis. He moves extremely well on clay. He runs from one end of the court to the other. He has fantastic strokes on this surface, and he is very strong, mentally speaking, at his age. That's probably what is most impressive at such a young age. He's won three Roland Garros titles at the age of 21, that's pretty impressive.

Q. The weather was hot today. At least hotter than during the rest of the tournament. Did it change the rebound conditions on the Center Court? And was it more difficult for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Maybe. Well, now I've lost, so I'd say yes (smiling). But these are just speculations. Had it been raining, maybe I would have won? I don't know. But I also like it when it's hotter, because I can serve better; it's easier. Balls are faster. They rebound faster, as well, but the spin is still there. And this spin will always be there on Nadal's balls. So he's a very good player.

I have made progress on my backhand, but also on forehand. And as for my service, I have improved as well. So I no longer have these problems I had in the beginning when I didn't know how to play him. I'm more relaxed, but he is more relaxed as well. He's evolved. He's a pretty good player, so he deserved his victory.

Q. On which part of his game has he progressed most as compared to last year?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't think he has made any progress. I always feel if he was to change his game, he might stop being able to win on clay. So I think he needs to keep this game, because with this specific type of game, he's just unbeatable on clay. I've defeated him once, not at the most important moment, but in Rome. I was very happy with my performance.

Q. Are you tempted to say that you've played this beautiful tournament for nothing? Or would you, on the contrary, that's another wonderful challenge ahead of me, I still want to win it when Nadal's present?

ROGER FEDERER: No. It's very positive to me. I can't say, well, I lost, whether losing in the first round, and now it is the same thing. I can't say that. I'm very happy when I have to face such situations, and when I feel I can win this tournament even against Nadal.

So you need to put yourself in that position. It's always difficult. Of course, that's only one hour after the match ended, and I know that I have to wait for one year. And then the olympic games are even worse because athletes have to wait for four years.

But I know I'll be back next year, and I'll try to do better. And I know that Nadal will be present as well. I know it's not easy to win this tournament, that's probably why I've not won it so far.

But now I want to focus on Wimbledon, and we'll talk about Roland Garros after the Australian Open.

Q. In the first set, you had the opportunity of winning this first set, and you never managed to convert the opportunities you had, but you had a player like Nadal. What did you feel at that time?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I had no problem with that. I never convert 100% of my breakpoint opportunities in one season, so you need to remain focused. You need to remain very much concentrated. He played very well. He didn't make that many mistakes today, so that made it more difficult for me.

But I was very happy with the level of tennis I played in the first set. Then I lost it; that was unfortunate. Then I won the second set. And, unfortunately, I didn't play that well at the end of the match. But he also raised his level and he was the strongest at the end.

Q. His winning three times in a row here, does it make him more dangerous in the other Grand Slam tournaments, on other surfaces?

ROGER FEDERER: I'd say more dangerous, yes. Because -- well, that's it. I mean, that's simple.

Q. Why simple?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, because when you win one Grand Slam tournament, you can win the others. It's just like me, when I won my first Wimbledon, I thought, "Well, I know how to win a Grand Slam tournament, so I can win the US Open, the Australian Open, and Roland Garros." It gives you motivation and confidence.

And given his final in Wimbledon last year, he knows that on all other surfaces, he can win the title. He won Indian Wells easily, and that's a surface which is very similar to that of the US Open or to that of Australia. So why not the other Grand Slam tournaments?

Yet, there are many other very good players, and it's not easy to win all the Grand Slam titles, because there are too many good players.

Q. When you came here this year, you had won once again Nadal on clay. So aren't you even more disappointed? Weren't your expectations even higher because you had won against Nadal before that?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you can put it the way you want. All I know, at the end of the day, is that I'm disappointed today, and I don't care a less about the way I've played over the last ten months or ten years. I wanted to win this match, and I didn't succeed. So, of course, it's a bit sad. But then, you know, life goes on.

And I want to congratulate Rafa for this beautiful tournament, and beautiful achievement. He's never lost here. It's not like losing against a lucky loser.

Q. You defeated him in Hamburg, but when he arrived here at Roland Garros, we felt he was undefeatable. Is this the feeling you had when you walked out of the courts?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not at all. I know I can win. So I'm not going to walk on the court thinking he is undefeatable. Maybe he's undefeatable for the others, but I also knew if somebody was capable of winning against him in this tournament, that was me. And I'm the only one who managed to win one set against him.

But, unfortunately, I couldn't win today.

Q. Do you need to change something in your game? Because your tennis is absolutely brilliant. We've seen that since the beginning of this tournament. But that is just not enough. So what do you need? What do you need to change in your game so that you can beat him?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I need to keep on working, and I don't think Rafael is going to play the coming ten finals here, nor me, by the way. But, at least, I need to work more. I know that I can beat him on any surface, any tournament. I'm not afraid when I know I'm going to play him, and that's important.

Q. Did you manage to use the plans or tactics you had in mind, no regrets?

ROGER FEDERER: No, absolutely no regrets. I fought my game. I made a few mistakes on a couple of occasions, on a certain number of occasions. Third and fourth sets were a bit disappointing. I thought I could do better, especially after the second set, and I didn't succeed. That's a bit of a shame. But not too many regrets, no.


http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2007-06-10/200706101181499007656.html

David L
06-11-2007, 06:20 AM
I don't think he should dwell on it either, but he played poorly, and brushed it off casually. What I meant by caving in, let's see, not converting 10 break points in a game and then immediately getting broken at love. If that's not caving then what is? Double faulting four points in a row? 1 of 17 break points won total. Like he didn't even want the damn trophy.Another thing, aside from the awkwardness of playing Nadal, there is also the question of form. It is very difficult to control the form you bring into a match. Some days you can play lights out, other times you cannot keep the ball in court. Nadal being the better clay court player, odds on, his form is going to be better more often than not on any given day, on clay. Federer is only human and he has lost to much less worthy adversaries. Nadal is a great clay court player, possibly the best we have seen, and totally deserved his victory. Federer's performance was not great, but was decent given the opponent he was dealing with. At least he won a set, something no one else was able to do. Might have been able to win the first two sets, but it just did'nt work out for him. That happens sometimes, you just have to take it. For much of his career so far things have gone very well, so he has to accept that things can also go the other way sometimes.

MasterTS
06-11-2007, 06:25 AM
believe me, he thinks that he can bat nadal on any surface...and he already did! So why wouldnt he think he couldnt?

The only time he beat nadal on clay was when Nadal was dead tired and fatigued. Even nadal admitted as much!

Fed knew coming into the FO final was a different task. Nadal was fresh, and had not lost a set! Fed knew he would lose from the start, which is why he could only convert 1 of 17 big points.

ktownva
06-11-2007, 06:35 AM
The only time he beat nadal on clay was when Nadal was dead tired and fatigued. Even nadal admitted as much!

Fed knew coming into the FO final was a different task. Nadal was fresh, and had not lost a set! Fed knew he would lose from the start, which is why he could only convert 1 of 17 big points.

He took Nadal to 5 sets and had match points last year in Rome, so it isn't like he has never had a good performance outside of Hamburg. And he smoked Nadal in the first set of the FO final last year. I thought he could beat Nadal and I'm still wondering why he didn't turn it up.

MasterTS
06-11-2007, 06:59 AM
He took Nadal to 5 sets and had match points last year in Rome, so it isn't like he has never had a good performance outside of Hamburg. And he smoked Nadal in the first set of the FO final last year. I thought he could beat Nadal and I'm still wondering why he didn't turn it up.

That one set he took nadal in the 2006 FO was a total fluck. Nadal was so nervous even a cr4p player like roddick coulda taken a set off nadal lolz.

And the same thing this year.. didn't you see how badly nadal played the first set, and he still won it LOL

lambielspins
06-11-2007, 07:12 AM
Hey listen, matches don't always pan out as one would want them to. You have an opponent on the other side of the net just as determined to win as you are. Nadal played really well on those breakpoints in the first set, he did'nt allow Federer to take the initiative. Nadal was basically a different player when he was down breakpoints in the first set, it was strange. Federer is not a puppet master who can completely control the dynamics of a match, he is only one half of the equation, who has some say. Nadal, however, has a bigger say because he is in his element on clay and his natural game just matches perfectly against Federer on this surface.


You are completely wrong. Fed choked big time on those break points and made easy errors on most. His level of played dropped big time on those break points.

David L
06-11-2007, 07:23 AM
You are completely wrong. Fed choked big time on those break points and made easy errors on most. His level of played dropped big time on those break points.Many things affect your level of play. Your nerve, your opponent, your form and various other imponderables. Whether he choked or not, it's all academic now. The rest of the season is ahead. Whatever mistakes he made, hopefully he can learn from them.

Ztalin
06-11-2007, 07:26 AM
That one set he took nadal in the 2006 FO was a total fluck. Nadal was so nervous even a cr4p player like roddick coulda taken a set off nadal lolz.

And the same thing this year.. didn't you see how badly nadal played the first set, and he still won it LOL

To be fair, Fed was equally nervous. He converted what, 0% of his many break points? Both players played like **** in the first 2 sets.

I think if he wasn't so nervous, he could've taken advantage in the first set; and easily won the first 2 sets. With good play, he could've taken another set after that. But that's hypothetical, and both players wer obviously very nervous.

Supernatural_Serve
06-11-2007, 07:36 AM
Nobody as competitive as Federer is over that big a loss in 5 minutes. He lost again to his nemesis. He played poorly. He had chances early in the match to seize control.

He's putting a good face on and looking forward, but I'm sure it burns and galls him to lose again.

aznobct
06-11-2007, 07:45 AM
The only time he beat nadal on clay was when Nadal was dead tired and fatigued. Even nadal admitted as much!

Fed knew coming into the FO final was a different task. Nadal was fresh, and had not lost a set! Fed knew he would lose from the start, which is why he could only convert 1 of 17 big points.

i don't really think fed....someone with 10 slams and 1 in the world....would ever go into a match thinking he would lose. theres no way he would win any match if he had that mentality

Ultra2HolyGrail
06-11-2007, 07:49 AM
Nervous? We are talking federer, multiple grand slam winner and #1. He is still human and sure there some pressure to win the french, but the better player, clay court player won.

Bassus
06-11-2007, 08:35 AM
The only time he beat nadal on clay was when Nadal was dead tired and fatigued. Even nadal admitted as much!

Fed knew coming into the FO final was a different task. Nadal was fresh, and had not lost a set! Fed knew he would lose from the start, which is why he could only convert 1 of 17 big points.


I thought Nadal said that physically he was fine in the Hamburg final, but perhaps he was a bit fatigued mentally.


But anyway, I am a Federer fan, and would love to see him win the French, preferrably against Nadal, but I wonder if he really believes that his window is not rapidly closing? Other than Agassi, who was the last guy to win this thing past his mid-20s? Costa perhaps?

The French seems to be the most unforgiving to age, so I'd say Federer has at most 2 good shots left.

Swingin Richard
06-11-2007, 09:00 AM
Fed folded like a cheap tent in a gale, but he'll move on. I think Wimbledon will be amazing this year. Roger is going to come out swinging, all these young players have a chance to finally step up and show they belong, Blake and Roddick need to get back on track, and it seems like the perception that Fed is unbeatable is starting to fade. Should be a good one.

Fries-N-Gravy
06-11-2007, 09:58 AM
Fed always looks really uncomfortable against nadal's massive spin. It's really not that hard to understand. He likes lower flatter faster balls and nadal hits these high, spinning, slow moonballs that take away his offense.

fluke or no fluke, winning is winning and losing is losing. he took a set off nadal which no one else could do regardless of the level of play.

federer hasn't lost very many GS finals or semis for someone who has 10 slams already. why don't you look at the GS records of the other so called greats? as someone said, agassi lost 2 finals at the french before he won it, which is why i don't understand how his victory can be considered a fluke by some.

maybe instead of flaming federer and nadal, haters should talk about why the rest of the world fails to even challenge either man for any GS title, except for safin who usually doesn't even get past the 1st round anywhere. maybe its everyone else who should retire?

tHotGates
06-11-2007, 10:36 AM
Fed always looks really uncomfortable against nadal's massive spin. It's really not that hard to understand. He likes lower flatter faster balls and nadal hits these high, spinning, slow moonballs that take away his offense.


I agree

fluke or no fluke, winning is winning and losing is losing. he took a set off nadal which no one else could do regardless of the level of play.

Fed should have stayed with the same strategy instead of stubbornly sticking with his "I can beat you from the baseline BH Rafa" .... did he forget about his slice?

federer hasn't lost very many GS finals or semis for someone who has 10 slams already. why don't you look at the GS records of the other so called greats? as someone said, agassi lost 2 finals at the french before he won it, which is why i don't understand how his victory can be considered a fluke by some.

I agree

maybe instead of flaming federer and nadal, haters should talk about why the rest of the world fails to even challenge either man for any GS title, except for safin who usually doesn't even get past the 1st round anywhere. maybe its everyone else who should retire?

An answer of sorts .... I am in the camp of critics who feel this Men's field is not that heavy at the top (especially mentally) & see the gulf between Fed & Nadal & everyone else as just more affirmation of that fact. It's not to invalidate what Roger & Nadal have accomplished (both are amazing players ... Fed, arguably the GOT & Rafa arguably the GOAT on clay) but outside of these two the story gets less interesting.

_mats_
06-11-2007, 11:10 AM
he likes to say "you know"

pound cat
06-11-2007, 12:23 PM
he likes to say "you know"

So does Sharapova. hmmmm

Nick Irons
06-11-2007, 01:04 PM
********

Rafa lives in his head and he probably wants to knife him. 5 minutes ? More like every 5 minutes. But I wouldn't admit it either.

Cindysphinx
06-11-2007, 01:06 PM
my guess is that he´s doing a (futile) effort to stick positive. what else can he do?

Yeah, if he says he's over this loss, then he's fibbing. Heck, I lost a 3.5 league match on Saturday where I had no chance and got blown out and I'm still not over it.

He needs to say that so the press will stop asking him about it so he really can get over it.

Jack & Coke
06-11-2007, 01:19 PM
David L (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/member.php?u=9848) is correct.

Good posts.. http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/images/icons/icon14.gif http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/images/icons/icon14.gif

Tennis_Goodness
06-11-2007, 10:07 PM
Federer is the best player to ever play the game....he'll bounce back just fine everybody lmao!

How many times has Federer proved everybody wrong on here, a zillion times is the count i'm at now!

officerdibble
06-12-2007, 02:03 AM
Yeah, if he says he's over this loss, then he's fibbing. Heck, I lost a 3.5 league match on Saturday where I had no chance and got blown out and I'm still not over it.

He needs to say that so the press will stop asking him about it so he really can get over it.

With respect, that in part is why you're a 3.5 - I can be like that too! There is a consistent theme amongst great sportsmen, they are eternally optimistic. They look forward, not back. They take the positives out of their performances (Tim Henman is a great example of this too, read any of his interviews after his matches of late).

They aren't lying, it's how they choose to see the world. If you walk out on to a court with doubts you're in trouble. I don't think this is a conscious action on the part of these elite sportsmen, it's an adaptive unconscious response that reflects how they pursue greatness.