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View Full Version : Great pics of Federers grips


bwinterr
06-14-2007, 12:35 PM
http://cache.gettyimages.com/xc/74438913.jpg?v=1&c=NewsMaker&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1936C93A00DCCA1DB505348C2FF7DF30406

http://cache.gettyimages.com/xc/74438971.jpg?v=1&c=NewsMaker&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1936C93A00DCCA1DB50EF458E9C3E900DA8

http://cache.gettyimages.com/xc/74505038.jpg?v=1&c=NewsMaker&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF193C4F70F8076A39DEE484AB0B895E2EBAA

http://cache.gettyimages.com/xc/74505266.jpg?v=1&c=NewsMaker&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF193C4F70F8076A39DEE4C92F36F3E00736C

I believe the last one is of a slice backhand

From the images I have gathered:

Forehand: Between eastern / semi-western
Backhand: Mostly eastern backhand grip
Slice Backhand: continental forehand grip

Yes, I know this is nothing new, but I just wanted to share some new pictures from the French Open

BreakPoint
06-14-2007, 01:04 PM
Thanks for posting.

Hmmm...his topspin backhand looks more like a standard eastern grip to me, while his slice backhand looks more like a continental grip to me.

His forehand does appear to be between eastern and semi-western.

drakulie
06-14-2007, 01:29 PM
Other than the slice, they all look like eastern grips to me. The FH, may be a bit past true eastern.

Hewitt rulez
06-14-2007, 01:43 PM
I think its also cool to see how he watches the ball even when he makes contact with it.

BHStennisplayer
06-14-2007, 01:43 PM
One of the few players with a non-western forehand left.

rbowser
06-14-2007, 01:46 PM
His slice is continental I thought.

keithchircop
06-14-2007, 02:33 PM
continental is the only way to slice a good backhand.

VikingSamurai
06-14-2007, 04:04 PM
As any Aussie of day's gone by, I was taught to shake the racquet's hand and go from there. It appears that Fed was originaly taught by the old school boys.. Good to see alteast one player that is still of my ilk.. One thing I cant understand, is that I grew up on a grass court, so you can understand the grips. But I thought Switzerland would be a clay court nation?.. So why does he play so bad on it?

LarougeNY
06-14-2007, 05:18 PM
As any Aussie of day's gone by, I was taught to shake the racquet's hand and go from there. It appears that Fed was originaly taught by the old school boys.. Good to see alteast one player that is still of my ilk.. One thing I cant understand, is that I grew up on a grass court, so you can understand the grips. But I thought Switzerland would be a clay court nation?.. So why does he play so bad on it?

He doesn't. He beats everybody in the world except one person. And, by watching the final, a lot of his loss was mental. The reason he moves so well on clay is partially due to having a familiarity with it from his junior days.

rbowser
06-14-2007, 06:13 PM
As any Aussie of day's gone by, I was taught to shake the racquet's hand and go from there. It appears that Fed was originaly taught by the old school boys.. Good to see alteast one player that is still of my ilk.. One thing I cant understand, is that I grew up on a grass court, so you can understand the grips. But I thought Switzerland would be a clay court nation?.. So why does he play so bad on it?

What do you mean the old school boys? What grips do you mean?

dirkgnuf
06-14-2007, 06:23 PM
Argh...nvm then

VikingSamurai
06-14-2007, 07:13 PM
The clay comment was meant as a sarcastic tongue-in-cheek remark.. Sheesh you guys need to get girlfriends or something......

I have always said that he is still young, and he will win that French Open.. I also agree with LarougeNY that the thing with Nadal is mental..

nyc
06-14-2007, 07:22 PM
great post -
Off topic, but I couldn't help but notice that it looks like he's using string savers on his 4th cross from the top. Can't really see any other crosses.

bwinterr
06-15-2007, 04:14 AM
yea he has string savers on the 4th and 6th cross strings from the top, alternating 4-6-4-6-4-6-4-6-4- on the main strings

Hartzy
06-15-2007, 06:01 AM
Due to freezing temperatures even into May, Switzerland is a clay court nation like 5 months of the year. Otherwise you'll be playing on carpet. Growing up on carpet might be what makes him so great on grass.

bwinterr
06-15-2007, 06:37 AM
Gruezi Hartzy!

I see that you too are from Switzerland. I lived in Zurich and Zug for 5 years when I was younger and l loved it there. It's good to see other people from Switzerland on this forum!

Pete.Sampras.
06-15-2007, 06:57 AM
Wow, he holds the racket exactly like I do. Nice!

Now if only I could play just like he does :p

nikdom
06-15-2007, 07:18 AM
Nice pics!

BTW that is an Eastern grip he uses for the backhand. See this-
http://www.tennis.com/yourgame/instructionarticles/forehand/forehand.aspx?id=649

The base of the first knuckle is on the top bevel.

And also the forehand grip is a perfect semi-western- the base of the first knuckle is on the bottom right angled bevel.

nikdom
06-15-2007, 07:26 AM
For my own game, I found these grips the best to emulate-

On my forehand, I gradually creeped from an eastern to a semi-western as my swing speed increased and I wanted to keep the ball within the baseline and take it over the net with some good top spin.

On the backhand, (1HBH) I moved from a continental (or axe) grip to an eastern as I got more confidence rolling over the top of the ball to impart top spin. The eastern grip keeps the wrist stable during the rollover.

For slice, serves and volleys I use the continental grip. This is my standard grip when I have both hands on the racquet (in between shots). It works well because for reaction and defensice shots, like volleys and backhand slices, I do not have time to change the grip and the continental gives the most stability and control.

When I do have the time to go for my shot on either side, I rotate to the appropriate grip and swing. I have found myself going a little overboard on the backhand sometimes (extreme eastern) and netting the ball. Also, sometimes I turn partially and the racquet tends to twist in my hand on contact. I guess that's the difference between the pros and mortals like myself. :)

Blade0324
06-15-2007, 07:45 AM
I have to agree with nikdom his FH is semi-western definately not eastern.

bwinterr
06-15-2007, 08:00 AM
I have been playing golf most of my life and for the past few weeks have been dedicated to learning tennis. I am interested in Federer's grips because coming from golf, my natural form involves a long and extended swing pattern. Since Federer has a similar style, I wanted to adopt his form. For me, these grips feel natural as I like to put topspin on both my forehand and backhand. I am glad I started this thread because I have learned a lot from everyone who has contributed to it. Thanks guys!

drakulie
06-15-2007, 08:05 AM
When one is going by where the base of the knuckle is located, it is very difficult to tell what type of grip is being used. For one, your hand may be extremely large and you may use an extremely small grip size>> ala Federer. So the base knuckle will not always be "located" where it is supposed to be according to charts, like the one posted by nikdom.

Secondly from those pics, noone could tell exactly where his knuckle is planted.

However, if you notice where the "V" shape of his hand is (shape between your thumb and pointer finger), you could see it is between bevel #1 (Eastern Grip), and not centered between the right side of the grip/behind the racquet (semi-western).

bwinterr
06-15-2007, 08:19 AM
I thought this was why one used the base of the index knuckle as a reference point since this point defines the angle of the hand around the grip. Thus it wouldn't matter how big ones hands were if the knuckle was in a consistent place on the grip? Just my 2 cents.

jetlee2k
06-15-2007, 10:37 AM
man, this is how I was taught to hold the racquet. It is exactly that how I hold it. Semi-western on the forehand, continental on slice and volleys then switch the racquet to semi-western for the back hand. The left hand is extremely important for switching the grip, balance and backswing.

Is it me or anyone else notice his Kfactor is thicker than stock racquet? may be it's visual effects but it seems like the beam a little bit thicker.

tennis_hand
06-15-2007, 11:28 AM
also proves he has a small hand, given his height of 185cm. There is gap between his ring finger and palm, and he uses a 4 3/8 with an overgrip only.

MTXR
06-15-2007, 12:28 PM
wow, according to that chart from tennis.com i been using a eastern forehand all along. I am switching to the semi western since it is sometimes inconsistent.

chlsmo
06-16-2007, 12:55 AM
also proves he has a small hand, given his height of 185cm. There is gap between his ring finger and palm, and he uses a 4 3/8 with an overgrip only.

I thought he had leather and then an overgrip. Also I think I read somewhere (probly on this forum) that he likes his overgrip wrapped with more overlap towards the butt, to build it up a bit. Correct me if i'm wrong.

tennis_hand
06-16-2007, 08:08 AM
I thought he had leather and then an overgrip. Also I think I read somewhere (probly on this forum) that he likes his overgrip wrapped with more overlap towards the butt, to build it up a bit. Correct me if i'm wrong.

of course with a leather grip. or do u understand my words as an overgrip over a bare handle? lol..

chlsmo
06-16-2007, 10:36 AM
of course with a leather grip. or do u understand my words as an overgrip over a bare handle? lol..

yeah that was what I thought you were saying. :)

stormholloway
06-16-2007, 03:54 PM
I still don't understand the placement of the index finger. I've been told to raise the finger a bit up the shaft for slices, but Federer does it on all of his shots.

What does this do?

FiveO
06-16-2007, 04:28 PM
Here's a thread from "Tennis Tips/Instruction" in which John Yandell, of tennisplayer.net and author of Visual Tennis chimed in regarding Fed's fh grip.

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=136490

Having instructed for many years I think the most "the V" between thumb and index finger is perhaps the most unreliable of the reference points to classify grips.

The other most unreliable is a single point of reference on the hand, i.e. the base knuckle of the index finger by itself.

I side with Bollitieri who used two points of reference on the hand to make such classifications:

1) the base knuckle of the index finger

AND

2) the heel pad of the hand

The problem with in using the base knuckle alone is that the orientation of the wrist and forearm to racquet face and shaft a vary incredibly as the heel pad moves from bevel to bevel even if the base knuckle doesn't.

For example the eastern bh grip should place both the knuckle and heel pad on bevel #1, the top panel when the racquet face is vertical or 90 degrees to the court.

With the same knuckle placement moving the heel pad towards panel #2 will alter the angle between forearm and racquet shaft and will open the racquet face slightly unless an adjustment is made to supinate the wrist slightly making this bh grip a hybrid between eastern and continental.

Leaving the knuckle on #1 and sliding the heel pad to panel #8 will tend to put the hand in a hammer grip, make the forearm/racquet shaft angle more acute (toward 90 %) and close the face, bringing the bh grip toward extreme eastern.

Noting the placement of both makes classifying grips easier because palm, finger, grip, size and differences in the "webbing between" fingers doesn't matter, as a line drawn from the first knuckle of the index finger to the heel pad will always bisect the player's palm. Knuckle and heel on panel 3 places the palm parallel to the racquet face for a pure eastern fh grip, both on panel 4 creates a pure sw fh grip and so on. IMO it's the most accurate way to classify grips.

sruckauf
06-17-2007, 03:29 PM
Hooray, another senseless 'I can spot the grip type better then you can' thread.

0d1n
06-20-2007, 12:49 AM
Here's a thread from "Tennis Tips/Instruction" in which John Yandell, of tennisplayer.net and author of Visual Tennis chimed in regarding Fed's fh grip.

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=136490

Having instructed for many years I think the most "the V" between thumb and index finger is perhaps the most unreliable of the reference points to classify grips.

The other most unreliable is a single point of reference on the hand, i.e. the base knuckle of the index finger by itself.

I side with Bollitieri who used two points of reference on the hand to make such classifications:

1) the base knuckle of the index finger

AND

2) the heel pad of the hand

The problem with in using the base knuckle alone is that the orientation of the wrist and forearm to racquet face and shaft a vary incredibly as the heel pad moves from bevel to bevel even if the base knuckle doesn't.

For example the eastern bh grip should place both the knuckle and heel pad on bevel #1, the top panel when the racquet face is vertical or 90 degrees to the court.

With the same knuckle placement moving the heel pad towards panel #2 will alter the angle between forearm and racquet shaft and will open the racquet face slightly unless an adjustment is made to supinate the wrist slightly making this bh grip a hybrid between eastern and continental.

Leaving the knuckle on #1 and sliding the heel pad to panel #8 will tend to put the hand in a hammer grip, make the forearm/racquet shaft angle more acute (toward 90 %) and close the face, bringing the bh grip toward extreme eastern.

Noting the placement of both makes classifying grips easier because palm, finger, grip, size and differences in the "webbing between" fingers doesn't matter, as a line drawn from the first knuckle of the index finger to the heel pad will always bisect the player's palm. Knuckle and heel on panel 3 places the palm parallel to the racquet face for a pure eastern fh grip, both on panel 4 creates a pure sw fh grip and so on. IMO it's the most accurate way to classify grips.

Total agreement from me. I am one who slides the "heel pad" towards panel 8, making my backhand grip sort of a hybrid between true eastern and extreme eastern. I am also holding my knuckle in pretty standard "eastern forehand" position but again, the heel pad is moved towards the true semi western, so again, I'm "in between standards". Using two points of reference will always be more precise than using just one.
My two pence worth.