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View Full Version : Has anyone cured TE/GE with a doctor help?


meticulous
06-20-2007, 09:04 AM
Has anyone cured TE/GE with a doctor help? No one helped me or my friends.
But if someone found this help from a doctor: What procedure helped you? What kind of physical exercise has been forbided by a doctor? Thanks.

bad_call
06-20-2007, 10:56 AM
nope. it needed to heal in due time. however the weekly dr's visits got me out of work.

Craig Sheppard
06-20-2007, 12:48 PM
The cases I've heard "cured" all involved a doctor telling the patient to rest and take some NSAIDs. Lotsa help there. I'd only go to a doc for that if it's weeks or months, rest doesn't help, and NSAIDs haven't helped.

Marius_Hancu
06-21-2007, 02:13 AM
Didn't happen in my case.

Had to reduce string tension, take a break (2 months), re-hab myself.

austro
06-21-2007, 02:22 AM
Yes, wrist stretching.

But I also moved to a heavier racket, so it wasn't entirely a controlled experiment.

ericwong
06-21-2007, 03:50 AM
Didn't happen in my case.

Had to reduce string tension, take a break (2 months), re-hab myself.

Did the same thing. I also do some strenghtening exercise like wrist curls and such

rasajadad
06-21-2007, 04:29 AM
I cured mine with the help of:
Dr.- Sent me to a trainer and PT
Equipment- PK racquet, natural gut strings
Tennis coach- 2HBH
Trainer- Excercises to strengthen supporting muscles
PT- Helped to get me out of pain
NO ADVIL!

Geezer Guy
06-21-2007, 07:10 AM
My Dr. perscribed NAOPRIN (probably not spelling that right), gave me a wrist brace thing, and told me to ice my elbow after playing.

That was about 5 months ago, and it's worked pretty well. The script only lasted 2 months, but I continue to do the other things, and my pain has continued to diminish.

I didn't reduce my playing time at all. I sought treatment for the TE pretty quickly once it came on, and the Dr. said it was OK to keep playing. If it was a severe case, he said, then I would help to lay off for awhile.

meticulous
06-21-2007, 09:26 AM
It looks like that our salvation depends on ourselves. If this is the case what we can change : 1.our equipment(racquet) & 2. our technique.
It’s clear about first: : heavier than 320g, stiffness under 65 ,headlight (over 4points), with 320 on swingweight (or less). Dense pattern could be too stiff string bed.Long racquet is bad.
2. Technique. What can you say specific about FOREHAND:
bend wrist, western grip, windshield ! It’s look like that all contribute to TE/GE
3. If so maybe better to hit forehand with NOT bend wrist, close to eastern grip, and with NO windshield? What can you add? What about other strokes? Marius Nansu ,what is your take?

timsims
06-21-2007, 10:28 AM
There's no need for the doctor. Rest first, then strengthen, then come back with PK racquet strung lower with gut or multi.

Supernatural_Serve
06-21-2007, 10:32 AM
No. It can't be cured, but its symptoms can be managed.

- Good stretching and strength training
- Proper warm-up before blasting the balls
- Proper awareness of your inflamation and pain levels
- REST
- Ice after playing
- if they help you: NSAID's and/or Analgesic Balms (e.g. Icy Hot)

- Increased awareness of what specific aspects of your game stress your elbow (for me, its aggressive serves not really ground strokes) and tone it down accordingly

The only thing I've seen doctor's help with is with Cortisone shots for people who go down that path, but that's not for me.

rbowser
06-27-2007, 02:59 PM
I think TE can be healed because isn't TE small tears in the tendon due to stress and overuse? Yes, you are right, it won't recover to the same flexibility of your 'old' tendon, but the newly reinforced one (if fully healed) would have the same strength.

tricky
06-27-2007, 03:20 PM
I think TE can be healed because isn't TE small tears in the tendon due to stress and overuse?

I can't speak for people who've needed surgery, but yes mild cases (i.e. there's little or none scar tissue) of TE can be healed.

In terms of exercises, it's about high-rep curling movements done in various directions. Whatever it takes to pool lactic acid into the area, and frequently over a period of months.

heycal
06-28-2007, 10:11 PM
For me, switching to a 2 hbh and gripping looser on serves and overheads is probably what helped the most. As for a doctor, I know some who have been helped by a cortisone shot, while others (including myself) were not.

In the meantime, you may want to check out this thread for other ideas:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=133304

ps60
06-29-2007, 10:16 AM
Just hurt my wrist again with a new string job. and elbow lot of pain too. May need to take a month off, and really have to consider buying another PK 5G (mine developed a crack just after 2 yrs play) or similar, the only racket that helps.

One of my tennis friends had TE due to a Shark with Luxillon Alu... He took 3 or more shots from a doctor and rest for a month and then he started playing again, so far no problem. Really admire him.

heycal
06-29-2007, 10:49 AM
Just hurt my wrist again with a new string job. and elbow lot of pain too. May need to take a month off, and really have to consider buying another PK 5G (mine developed a crack just after 2 yrs play) or similar, the only racket that helps.

One of my tennis friends had TE due to a Shark with Luxillon Alu... He took 3 or more shots from a doctor and rest for a month and then he started playing again, so far no problem. Really admire him.

Admire him? Why? Maybe you mean envy him..?

I use a PK 5g myself. I'd be pleased if it's lasts two years without a crack with the way I toss it around.

Ever used a Ki 15 PSE? I demoed one, and it felt comfy, but oh so powerful too... You may want to consider that one if you want something a little different than the 5g.

ivo#1fan
07-03-2007, 12:09 PM
I had surgery for Golfer's elbow this January. This was after 8 months of rest and NSAIDS had not significantly improved my problem. My pain was mainly on forehands and serving. The doctor went in through about a 4 inch incision in the inner elbow, opened the tendon, removed necrotic tissue, moved the ulnar nerve deeper into the arm so it wouldn't be exposed and sewed things shut. Rehab was about a month of stretching followed by about a month of light weights. Wrist curls and extensions and torque exercises with wrench. About 10 weeks after surgery tried light tennis (hit on wall), that was OK. Slowly moved up to hitting on ball machine. Again OK as long as I hit ball out in front and held racquet loosley. Then moved up to hitting gently with person. I found this was painful again to the elbow. Problem with hitting with a person was with shots I had to reach for or if ball was behind me or off center shots. After a couple of times the elbow started to hurt just like presurgery. I should point out that I was never pain free post surgery. Certain motions, particularly pressing down with my finger tips always hurt. I've now rested completely, no weights, tennis, just stretching for the past 8 weeks and the elbow feels the best it has in a year and a half. I'm hoping to slowly work back into tennis again. My general feeling is the surgery was worthless and just rest and time is the essential key. It seems like in a severe case such as mine it may require over a year of rest.

hifi heretic
07-03-2007, 05:33 PM
if you search my user name, you'll see many posts from me on TE.

Long short of it is, I've had TE surgery on BOTH arms. My left arm was treated (3yrs ago) via traditional "open" TE surgery (debride, exise dead tissue, reattach tendon, etc..) and my right (racquet arm) was done via Orthroscopic (1.5yrs ago). Since about 6 mos. post-op, I have been able to play tennis. I only have pain when I do dumb things (ie. wrist-flick a ball back over my head, hit very late on my backhand, etc..).

Neither doc knows precisely why I got TE, though both suggest that there are predisposing factors. Apart from the usual predisposing activities (typing, tennis, swinging a hammer, etc..) I have very muscular forearms which, according to both docs, means that there is near constant tension in the forearm muscles means that the forearm tendons are constantly pulling at the attachment point on the elbow. Since I was a teenager, my forearms have always been very vascular and taut looking. This certainly isn't meant to be boastful (like this is something people would want, anyway), it just happens to be the way I'm built.

I agreed to surgery only after suffering with TE for several years with countless attempts at rehab and non-invasive treatments (prolotherapy, cortisone shots, casting my right arm for several weeks, etc..). Rest didn't help either. Surgery - for me anyway - was a godsend

ivo#1fan
07-04-2007, 06:45 AM
Hifi thanks for the post. Can you give a brief description of your post surgery rehab and time frame for getting back into tennis. Thanks.

gacu
07-05-2007, 06:51 PM
For mild cases:

1. ice
2. use gut or multi
3. keep playing
4. warm up the muscle properly. 9 out of 10 people show up at the court and start swinging at the ball medium-hard. That doesn't help and will bring back some pain to an elbow that is about to cure.

Netgame
07-16-2007, 09:01 AM
I had TE for about 9 months, and then I saw a DVD about using certain yoga moves to help TE. I was much better in 30 days. I basically did the plank position, and then lifted my arm in the air and gently pulled it at the wrist to try and lengthen the arm. This theoretically opens the joint to allow blood to get in there and do it's thing.

After it gets better, keep the muscles tone with the usual exercises and the plank to prevent recurrences. It wouldn't hurt to check your technique and your equipment for possible causes.

Anyway, that's what worked for me. ;)

penpal
07-16-2007, 01:31 PM
Just wrote a post in my blog (http://courtcoverage.com/tennisblog/?p=38) about a recently released study related to TE.

Sounds like there is definitely a surgical treatment available now that is effective. Still, I'm no doctor, but I would certainly try non-surgical approaches first if it were my elbow.